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Blichmann Boilmaker Thermometer

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  • Pete Miller
    I recently purchased a Blichmann Boilmaker 10G pot with the thermometer.  The hole for the thermometer is at at 4 gallon mark.  I am currently doing extract
    Message 1 of 11 , May 30, 2011
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      I recently purchased a Blichmann Boilmaker 10G pot with the thermometer.  The hole for the thermometer is at at 4 gallon mark.  I am currently doing extract brewing and eventually want to get into full grain brewing so I figured the 10G pot was a good one to grow into.  I am getting ready to brew an Oatmeal Stout and it says to start with 2 gallons of water to steep the grains in.  It says after you finish the 30 minute steeping, add in the extract and at this time you can add more water.  The 2 gallons of water won't bring the water up to the thermometer level.  Is it ok to put more water in for the steeping phase or do you need a smaller amount of water to initially steep the grain and oatmeal?  The other question I have is are there any extensions that can be slid onto the thermometer pole that would be at a right angle to bring the pole down into the liquid so it will be able to measure the temperature?  I was thinking about taking a peice of copper or stainless tubing bent at a right angle and try to make the end so it will slide onto the end of the thermometer that sticks thru the pot to see if it will conduct the heat to the thermometer and see how much it affects the thermometer reading.  Has anyone tried this before or have any suggestions.  The other option is to drill a lower hole and put a screw into the upper hole to move the thermometer down for smaller batches.  I would prefer not to drill another hole unless I have to.
       
      Also with an 5Gallon Oatmeal Stout kit, if I wanted to make it into a milk stout, how much lactose should be added?
    • Tom Schmidlin
      For a milk stout I use 0.5-1 lb of lactose. I wouldn t add more water, there are some water chemistry concerns with steeping grains in too large a volume.
      Message 2 of 11 , May 30, 2011
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        For a milk stout I use 0.5-1 lb of lactose.

        I wouldn't add more water, there are some water chemistry concerns with steeping grains in too large a volume.  Basically it affects what the pH ends up being and the tannins that might be extracted at that pH.  It might be fine but it might not, it depends on your water.

        Juts get another thermometer and take your temps that way.  I should mention though, that oatmeal needs to be mashed and not just steeped.  Make sure you have some base malt in there so it will convert.  Heat the water to your strike temp, add the grain bag, and don't worry about it.

        Tom




        -----Original Message-----
        From: Pete Miller
        Sent: May 30, 2011 3:40 PM
        To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [BrewEquip] Blichmann Boilmaker Thermometer

         

        I recently purchased a Blichmann Boilmaker 10G pot with the thermometer.  The hole for the thermometer is at at 4 gallon mark.  I am currently doing extract brewing and eventually want to get into full grain brewing so I figured the 10G pot was a good one to grow into.  I am getting ready to brew an Oatmeal Stout and it says to start with 2 gallons of water to steep the grains in.  It says after you finish the 30 minute steeping, add in the extract and at this time you can add more water.  The 2 gallons of water won't bring the water up to the thermometer level.  Is it ok to put more water in for the steeping phase or do you need a smaller amount of water to initially steep the grain and oatmeal?  The other question I have is are there any extensions that can be slid onto the thermometer pole that would be at a right angle to bring the pole down into the liquid so it will be able to measure the temperature?  I was thinking about taking a peice of copper or stainless tubing bent at a right angle and try to make the end so it will slide onto the end of the thermometer that sticks thru the pot to see if it will conduct the heat to the thermometer and see how much it affects the thermometer reading.  Has anyone tried this before or have any suggestions.  The other option is to drill a lower hole and put a screw into the upper hole to move the thermometer down for smaller batches.  I would prefer not to drill another hole unless I have to.
         
        Also with an 5Gallon Oatmeal Stout kit, if I wanted to make it into a milk stout, how much lactose should be added?

      • Joe Strain aka Yodar
        Why drill or suffer the slight error a thermometer extention offers. Good digital thermometers arer available with k- thermocouples on  a pig tail so you can
        Message 3 of 11 , May 30, 2011
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          Why drill or suffer the slight error a thermometer extention offers.

          Good digital thermometers arer available with k- thermocouples on  a pig tail so you can dunk your thermometer into whatever you want a temp. reading from

          i have two Thermocouples, one stainless steel on a 8' pigtail that I dunk in my
          keggle, and to the right of the readout is the mashTun with the other thermocouple pigtail that plugs into the readout-display whenever I wnat to read mash temp 

          One of the thermoxcouples came with the thermometer and the othe aftermarket was about $20.

          Yodar

          "The contest for ages has been to rescue
          liberty from the grasp of executive power."
          Daniel Webster

          --- On Mon, 5/30/11, Pete Miller <pmillervb@...> wrote:


           

          I recently purchased a Blichmann Boilmaker 10G pot with the thermometer.  The hole for the thermometer is at at 4 gallon mark.  I am currently doing extract brewing and eventually want to get into full grain brewing so I figured the 10G pot was a good one to grow into.  I am getting ready to brew an Oatmeal Stout and it says to start with 2 gallons of water to steep the grains in.  It says after you finish the 30 minute steeping, add in the extract and at this time you can add more water.  The 2 gallons of water won't bring the water up to the thermometer level.  Is it ok to put more water in for the steeping phase or do you need a smaller amount of water to initially steep the grain and oatmeal?  The other question I have is are there any extensions that can be slid onto the thermometer pole that would be at a right angle to bring the pole down into the liquid so it will be able to measure the temperature?  I was thinking about taking a peice of copper or stainless tubing bent at a right angle and try to make the end so it will slide onto the end of the thermometer that sticks thru the pot to see if it will conduct the heat to the thermometer and see how much it affects the thermometer reading.  Has anyone tried this before or have any suggestions.  The other option is to drill a lower hole and put a screw into the upper hole to move the thermometer down for smaller batches.  I would prefer not to drill another hole unless I have to.
           
          Also with an 5Gallon Oatmeal Stout kit, if I wanted to make it into a milk stout, how much lactose should be added?
        • Pete Miller
          Tom stated: I should mention though, that oatmeal needs to be mashed and not just steeped.  Make sure you have some base malt in there so it will
          Message 4 of 11 , May 30, 2011
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            Tom stated: ' I should mention though, that oatmeal needs to be mashed and not just steeped.  Make sure you have some base malt in there so it will convert.' 
            This is the first time I've done oatmeal stout, I've only done simple kits with malt and a small amount of grain to be added during the steeping phase in the past and am in the process of upgrading equipment to be able to eventually do all grain brewing.  My Oatmeal Stout kit has the oatmeal flakes and steeping grain mixed together so I assumed they were to be put in the muslin bag together during the steeping phase.  Should the Oatmeal be separated from the mix and just the grain steeped, then the oatmeal flakes added after the steeping phase when I add in the malt before the rolling boil?  Does the oatmeal remain in the mix or should it be put into a bag to be removed?  Any suggestions on handling the oatmeal flakes is much appreciated.
          • tschmidlin@earthlink.net
            Mashing is just steeping at a specific temperature for a longer time. It s nothing to stress over. Where did you get the kit and what do the directions say?
            Message 5 of 11 , May 30, 2011
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              Mashing is just steeping at a specific temperature for a longer time. It's nothing to stress over.

              Where did you get the kit and what do the directions say? Most likely there is some base malt in with the grains to convert them. If they don't specify, I'd suggest heating the water to 155-160, adding the grains and letting it sit for 60 minutes, then proceed as normal. It'll be fine.

              Tom
            • Pete Miller
              The kit is an OATMEAL STOUT kit from American Brewmaster and I ve been very happy with their kits.  It gives very detailed instructions. 1) Fill your brewpot
              Message 6 of 11 , May 31, 2011
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                The kit is an OATMEAL STOUT kit from American Brewmaster and I've been very happy with their kits.  It gives very detailed instructions.
                1) Fill your brewpot with 2 gallons of water.  Heat water to 155 degrees F.
                2) Place the steeping grains inside the muslin bag & tie.  Add the bag to the brewpot and steep grains for 30 minutes (DO NOT BOIL).  After 30 minutes, remove bag and let drain into boil kettle.  Resist the temptation to squeeze the grain bag.  Discard the grain bag.
                3) Turn off the head and add all of your liquid extract to the brewpot while stirring.  Thoroughly dissolve themalt extract into the wort.  If your brewpot is large enough, you can add more water at this time.  Be sure ot leave about 1-1.5 gallons of space in your brewpot for foaming and boiling.
                4) Retun heat to the brewpot & bring to a gentle rolling boil.  Add the Bittering hops to the brewpot then you will boil this mixture, called wort, for 60 minutes.  Periodically stir the wort, leaving the lid off or offset to prevent a boil-over.
                5) Add 1 Whirlfloc tablet to the brewpot with 15 minutes left in the 60 minute biol.  When the boil is complete turn off the heat.
                ...
                It goes on for 14 steps, plus an additional 6 for bottling.  I put mine from the fermenter into a 5 gallon soda keg so I don't do anything with the bottling steps.

                The oat flakes were mixed in with the grain, and the instructions don't specify anything special to do with them, so it looks like they expect it to be included with the grain.  They don't mention putting any of the malt extract in until after the steeping phase.  Should a portion be put in during the steeping phase?
              • Greg Kelley
                Keep it all together.  Do you have any base malt (i.e. not special grain) in there?  You ll need that to convert the oatmeal.  Use a ratio of 1.25-2qts of
                Message 7 of 11 , May 31, 2011
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                  Keep it all together.  Do you have any base malt (i.e. not special grain) in there?  You'll need that to convert the oatmeal.  Use a ratio of 1.25-2qts of water per pound of grain.  Heat the water to about 165F.  Add the grain.  Mix and check the temperature.  It should be between 150F and 155F.  Let it sit for 45 min.  Drain liquid, rinse grains with hot water and proceed as normal.  That is what I did for my oatmeal stout.  I don't use a bag.  I let the grain free float.  I strain the grains through a big strainer that I have.
                   
                  -Greg

                  From: Pete Miller <pmillervb@...>
                  To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, May 30, 2011 10:30 PM
                  Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Blichmann Boilmaker Thermometer - Oatmeal Stout



                  Tom stated: ' I should mention though, that oatmeal needs to be mashed and not just steeped.  Make sure you have some base malt in there so it will convert.' 
                  This is the first time I've done oatmeal stout, I've only done simple kits with malt and a small amount of grain to be added during the steeping phase in the past and am in the process of upgrading equipment to be able to eventually do all grain brewing.  My Oatmeal Stout kit has the oatmeal flakes and steeping grain mixed together so I assumed they were to be put in the muslin bag together during the steeping phase.  Should the Oatmeal be separated from the mix and just the grain steeped, then the oatmeal flakes added after the steeping phase when I add in the malt before the rolling boil?  Does the oatmeal remain in the mix or should it be put into a bag to be removed?  Any suggestions on handling the oatmeal flakes is much appreciated.




                • Greg Kelley
                  Nope.  Do not add the malt extract until the boiling phase. From: Pete Miller To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday,
                  Message 8 of 11 , May 31, 2011
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                    Nope.  Do not add the malt extract until the boiling phase.

                    From: Pete Miller <pmillervb@...>
                    To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 8:04 AM
                    Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Blichmann Boilmaker Thermometer - Oatmeal Stout



                    The kit is an OATMEAL STOUT kit from American Brewmaster and I've been very happy with their kits.  It gives very detailed instructions.
                    1) Fill your brewpot with 2 gallons of water.  Heat water to 155 degrees F.
                    2) Place the steeping grains inside the muslin bag & tie.  Add the bag to the brewpot and steep grains for 30 minutes (DO NOT BOIL).  After 30 minutes, remove bag and let drain into boil kettle.  Resist the temptation to squeeze the grain bag.  Discard the grain bag.
                    3) Turn off the head and add all of your liquid extract to the brewpot while stirring.  Thoroughly dissolve themalt extract into the wort.  If your brewpot is large enough, you can add more water at this time.  Be sure ot leave about 1-1.5 gallons of space in your brewpot for foaming and boiling.
                    4) Retun heat to the brewpot & bring to a gentle rolling boil.  Add the Bittering hops to the brewpot then you will boil this mixture, called wort, for 60 minutes.  Periodically stir the wort, leaving the lid off or offset to prevent a boil-over.
                    5) Add 1 Whirlfloc tablet to the brewpot with 15 minutes left in the 60 minute biol.  When the boil is complete turn off the heat.
                    ...
                    It goes on for 14 steps, plus an additional 6 for bottling.  I put mine from the fermenter into a 5 gallon soda keg so I don't do anything with the bottling steps.

                    The oat flakes were mixed in with the grain, and the instructions don't specify anything special to do with them, so it looks like they expect it to be included with the grain.  They don't mention putting any of the malt extract in until after the steeping phase.  Should a portion be put in during the steeping phase?




                  • Brian Sico
                    For best results, change your steep into a mash. To do this, you need to control the mix ratio and temperature well. The temp should be about 150-155F for
                    Message 9 of 11 , May 31, 2011
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                      For best results, change your steep into a mash.  To do this, you need to control the mix ratio and temperature well.  The temp should be about 150-155F for the entire mashing time.  The mix ratio should be about 1.5 qt water per lb of dry malt.  Weigh the grain bag of specialty grains if the weight is not listed and calculate out the amount of water needed.  It will be pretty thick and a bit hard to do with a grain bag.  You may need to add a bit more water, but add only enough to wet all the grains (all the way to the center of the grain bag).  When the steep/mash is over (60 min is better than 45) you can add all of your water to bring it up to your boil volume (usually 6 gal).  If the water is hot (about 165-170F), you can pour about 1/2 gal it over the grain bag to rinse out the grains.  Remove and discard the steeping/mash grains, bring to a boil, kill the flame, add the malt extract, reheat to boil, add hops, etc...

                      Welcome to home brewing!  If you haven't yet, I recommend you check out a CARBOY meeting.  We are a local homebrewing club and have a great depth of knowledge and would love to help you out!  Go to www.carboyclub.com.  

                      On Tue, May 31, 2011 at 9:15 AM, Greg Kelley <gwk1973@...> wrote:
                       

                      Nope.  Do not add the malt extract until the boiling phase.

                      Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 8:04 AM

                      Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Blichmann Boilmaker Thermometer - Oatmeal Stout



                      The kit is an OATMEAL STOUT kit from American Brewmaster and I've been very happy with their kits.  It gives very detailed instructions.
                      1) Fill your brewpot with 2 gallons of water.  Heat water to 155 degrees F.
                      2) Place the steeping grains inside the muslin bag & tie.  Add the bag to the brewpot and steep grains for 30 minutes (DO NOT BOIL).  After 30 minutes, remove bag and let drain into boil kettle.  Resist the temptation to squeeze the grain bag.  Discard the grain bag.
                      3) Turn off the head and add all of your liquid extract to the brewpot while stirring.  Thoroughly dissolve themalt extract into the wort.  If your brewpot is large enough, you can add more water at this time.  Be sure ot leave about 1-1.5 gallons of space in your brewpot for foaming and boiling.
                      4) Retun heat to the brewpot & bring to a gentle rolling boil.  Add the Bittering hops to the brewpot then you will boil this mixture, called wort, for 60 minutes.  Periodically stir the wort, leaving the lid off or offset to prevent a boil-over.
                      5) Add 1 Whirlfloc tablet to the brewpot with 15 minutes left in the 60 minute biol.  When the boil is complete turn off the heat.
                      ...
                      It goes on for 14 steps, plus an additional 6 for bottling.  I put mine from the fermenter into a 5 gallon soda keg so I don't do anything with the bottling steps.

                      The oat flakes were mixed in with the grain, and the instructions don't specify anything special to do with them, so it looks like they expect it to be included with the grain.  They don't mention putting any of the malt extract in until after the steeping phase.  Should a portion be put in during the steeping phase?





                    • Pete Miller
                      Brian said I recommend you check out a CARBOY meeting.  We are a local homebrewing club and have a great depth of knowledge and would love to help you out!
                      Message 10 of 11 , May 31, 2011
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                        Brian said 'I recommend you check out a CARBOY meeting.  We are a local homebrewing club and have a great depth of knowledge and would love to help you out!  Go to www.carboyclub.com.'

                        Thanks for the information from everyone on both the brewing and the Carboy club.  I plan on joining and hopefully I'll be able to make it to the next meeting. The Oatmeal Milk Stout should be done by then, but no guarantee there will be any left.  I'm using an upcoming birthday as an excuse to upgrade equipment.  I just got a new pot and will hopefully get my new stainless conical fermenter today or tomorrow so I might have some upcoming questions on the use of conicals. I don't know if I'll be able to wait for the weekend to make this batch, I may have to break everything in midweek.  I'm trying to have the batch ready for an incoming inlaw invasion on July 4th. 
                      • stencil
                        On Tue, 31 May 2011 07:49:26 +0000, in Re: [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1021 ... Partially fill a couple or three freezer-grade ziplock bags with tap water and
                        Message 11 of 11 , May 31, 2011
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                          On Tue, 31 May 2011 07:49:26 +0000,
                          in Re: [BrewEquip] Digest Number 1021
                          Pete Miller wrote:

                          > [ ... ] The 2 gallons of water won't bring the water up to the
                          >thermometer level.  Is it ok to put more water in for the steeping phase
                          >

                          Partially fill a couple or three freezer-grade ziplock bags
                          with tap water and chuck them in, as needed to raise the
                          level. Or, more practically, just use a handheld thermometer
                          to check as needed. For non-critical maneuvers like steeping
                          or acid rest, you can in time develop a very precise gauge of
                          temperature by sticking your finger in the mash. You're
                          brewing, not free-basing.

                          gds, stencil
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