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Re: RIMS or HERMS or?

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  • lowfredflyer
    I am now set up for a very basic RIMS system but I also started with extract, then partial-extract where most of my fermentables came from a batch-sparged,
    Message 1 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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      I am now set up for a very basic RIMS system but I also started with extract, then partial-extract where most of my fermentables came from a batch-sparged, infusion mash. My mash tun was a 5-gallon round Igloo cooler with a false bottom that I converted using some kit parts from a Homebrew Store.

      If you have not seen it, check out this link http://hbd.org/cascade/dennybrew/

      Denny Conn makes it really simple.

      Also take a look thru the Brewing Network archives for the podcasts that reference all-grain brewing and getting started. Finally, I happen to like some other forums in addition to this one including The Brewing Network Forum, MoreBeer, Northern Brewer, and Homebrewtalk...

      Good luck and Hoppy New Year!
    • t2000kwt
      Another approach you might try first is to do a partial mash, using some extract to make the mash more manageable.
      Message 2 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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        Another approach you might try first is to do a partial mash, using some extract to make the mash more manageable.

        http://www.homebrewhq.com/Beer/PartialMash.aspx

        other sites with information can be found by searching for "partial mash" on Google, Bing, etc.

        Clone Brews has recipes for all extract, partial mash, and all grain for each clone brew, if I remember correctly.

        Don
      • t2000kwt
        An interesting discussion thread here today about one home brewer who switched from a HERMS to RIMS system:
        Message 3 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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          An interesting discussion thread here today about one home brewer who switched from a HERMS to RIMS system:

          http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/forum//index.php?showtopic=39523&st=0&#entry574812

          you have to join to post, but I believe you can read the forums without joining.

          Keep in mind this is an Australian forum for home brewers. Others are welcome, of course, but I mention this because the units are in liters, centigrade, etc.

          Don
        • Mike Kennedy
          Why dont you try BIAB it is a good intro into AG without the expence, many stay with it. Rgds mike Sent from Mike s iPhone
          Message 4 of 29 , Jan 1, 2010
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            Why dont you try BIAB it is a good intro into AG without the expence,
            many stay with it. Rgds mike

            Sent from Mike's
            iPhone
          • greenspider
            I ve pretty much settled that I will build a HERMS type of system. I m not a by-the-book type of fellow so I investigate what others have done that my not be
            Message 5 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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              I've pretty much settled that I will build a HERMS type of system.
              I'm not a by-the-book type of fellow so I investigate what others have done that my not be considered copacetic by aficionados, but the users claim great success with.
              Again this is related to how much money one has to spend on the REAL stuff, I have very little, so improvise I must.
              I'd really like to hear from folks who have built a system on the cheap, and have been successful.
              If you can give me the breakdown of how you did it that would be great, especially if you have pics to boot.

              Thanks guys, I really appreciate everyone's input and sharing of their knowledge.
              I hope to return the favor by helping some newb in the near future.

              I'm not going to start the build for a couple of eeks so I have plenty of time to learn, and narrow my final design.

              P.S.; I have a commercial coffee grinder by Bunn (like in the grocery stores), with a digital scale.
              Does anyone know if this will suffice as a barley crusher?
              It has several settings from fine grind to coarse.
                           


            • Denis Barsalo
              I was lucky enough to have a welder for a brother in law, so all my welding, cutting, etc was done for free... or at the most, for a couple of pints of
              Message 6 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                I was lucky enough to have a welder for a brother in law, so all my welding, cutting, etc was done for free... or at the most, for a couple of pints of homebrew.
                 
                I know of others who have pretty much built the same setup using non-welded connections and they seem to work fine. You can look at the weld free type of connectors they sell online then go to the hardware store and buy the same pieces. You will be able to make it all weld-free and hopefully leak free.
                 
                For the coffee grinder, you can give it a shot on coarse, but I have a feeling that unless you are brewing a stout, it will be hard to get rid of the coffee taste. Also, I have a feeling that even on coarse, it will have sheared your barley too much causing you grief. But it's worth a shot. I know of some very good brewers who still use the Corona type corn mill. If you are willing to adjust your recipes with a bit more grain expecting slightly less efficiency from a coarse crush, then you will do fine.
                 
                Good luck!
                 
                Denis


                From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of greenspider
                Sent: January-02-10 11:19 AM
                To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [BrewEquip] Re:HERMS or?


                I've pretty much settled that I will build a HERMS type of system.
                I'm not a by-the-book type of fellow so I investigate what others have done that my not be considered copacetic by aficionados, but the users claim great success with.
                Again this is related to how much money one has to spend on the REAL stuff, I have very little, so improvise I must.
                I'd really like to hear from folks who have built a system on the cheap, and have been successful.
                If you can give me the breakdown of how you did it that would be great, especially if you have pics to boot.

                Thanks guys, I really appreciate everyone's input and sharing of their knowledge.
                I hope to return the favor by helping some newb in the near future.

                I'm not going to start the build for a couple of eeks so I have plenty of time to learn, and narrow my final design.

                P.S.; I have a commercial coffee grinder by Bunn (like in the grocery stores), with a digital scale.
                Does anyone know if this will suffice as a barley crusher?
                It has several settings from fine grind to coarse.
                        

                 
              • t2000kwt
                Personally, I wouldn t even waste my time with the coffee grinder. If you re trying to save money on equipment costs, either get your grain pre-crushed for you
                Message 7 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                  Personally, I wouldn't even waste my time with the coffee grinder. If you're trying to save money on equipment costs, either get your grain pre-crushed for you or get a Corona grain mill (or a knock-off), maybe find a used one on eBay.

                  Here's a new one similar to the Corona for about $41 shipped in the US:

                  <http://cgi.ebay.com/High-Hopper-CAST-IRON-GRAIN-CORN-Cereal-Mill-Grinder_W0QQitemZ130344536221QQcmdZViewItemQQptZSmall_Kitchen_Appliances_US?hash=item1e5923c89d>

                  For a little more than double that price, you can get a mill that's not temperamental and is consistent. An entry level (and good) barley crusher is the cheaper Phil Mill:

                  <http://www.beer-wine.com/product_info.asp?productID=1064§ionID=1>

                  Reports are that this one even works better than the more expensive one, though it might be a little slower. But what's a few more minutes when your brew day will be several hours anyway? The hopper is provided by yourself: a 2 (or 3) liter bottle with the bottom cut out. It's an *adjustable* single roller grain mill. Some of the more expensive ones aren't even adjustable, though you may not even care since they all do a good enough job with both 2 and 6 row barley.

                  If initial cost is an issue, start out by paying the small charge for getting your grains pre-crushed. Some home brew supply stores don't even charge for this, and if you buy yours at a brick and mortar store you are probably allowed to crush your own grains using their equipment for free.

                  Don
                • Denis Barsalo
                  I agree totally with the quality of the PhilMill I. I owned and used one for several years (10+) and it performed marvellously. I recently moved on to a more
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                    I agree totally with the quality of the PhilMill I.

                    I owned and used one for several years (10+) and it performed marvellously.
                    I recently moved on to a more expensive three-roller and although it crushes
                    the grain in a fraction of the time the Phil did, the crush is not any
                    better.

                    That small single roller with a curved plate crushes the barley perfectly.
                    The only drawback is the throughput.

                    Denis

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                    [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of t2000kwt
                    Sent: January-02-10 12:25 PM
                    To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [BrewEquip] Re: RIMS or HERMS or?

                    (snip)

                    For a little more than double that price, you can get a mill that's not
                    temperamental and is consistent. An entry level (and good) barley crusher is
                    the cheaper Phil Mill:

                    <http://www.beer-wine.com/product_info.asp?productID=1064§ionID=1>

                    Reports are that this one even works better than the more expensive
                    one.......

                    (snip)
                  • greenspider
                    Thanks, that s what I was figuring I d hear since I never heard of anyone using the coffee grinders. Just checking. ...   Personally, I wouldn t even waste my
                    Message 9 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                      Thanks, that's what I was figuring I'd hear since I never heard of anyone using the coffee grinders.
                      Just checking.


                      --- On Sat, 1/2/10, t2000kwt <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                       Personally, I wouldn't even waste my time with the coffee grinder. If you're trying to save money on equipment costs, either get your grain pre-crushed for you or get a Corona grain mill (or a knock-off), maybe find a used one on eBay.


                      Here's a new one similar to the Corona for about $41 shipped in the US:

                      <http://cgi.ebay. com/High- Hopper-CAST- IRON-GRAIN- CORN-Cereal- Mill-Grinder_ W0QQitemZ1303445 36221QQcmdZViewI temQQptZSmall_ Kitchen_Applianc es_US?hash= item1e5923c89d>

                      For a little more than double that price, you can get a mill that's not temperamental and is consistent. An entry level (and good) barley crusher is the cheaper Phil Mill:

                      <http://www.beer- wine.com/ product_info. asp?productID= 1064&sectionID= 1>

                      Reports are that this one even works better than the more expensive one, though it might be a little slower. But what's a few more minutes when your brew day will be several hours anyway? The hopper is provided by yourself: a 2 (or 3) liter bottle with the bottom cut out. It's an *adjustable* single roller grain mill. Some of the more expensive ones aren't even adjustable, though you may not even care since they all do a good enough job with both 2 and 6 row barley.

                      If initial cost is an issue, start out by paying the small charge for getting your grains pre-crushed. Some home brew supply stores don't even charge for this, and if you buy yours at a brick and mortar store you are probably allowed to crush your own grains using their equipment for free.

                      Don


                    • Ricky R.
                      I got a corona knock off at big lot for 14 bucks ... From: greenspider To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2010 12:45 PM Subject:
                      Message 10 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                        I got a corona knock off at big lot for 14 bucks
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2010 12:45 PM
                        Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Re: RIMS or HERMS or?

                         

                        Thanks, that's what I was figuring I'd hear since I never heard of anyone using the coffee grinders.
                        Just checking.


                        --- On Sat, 1/2/10, t2000kwt <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:

                          Personally, I wouldn't even waste my time with the coffee grinder. If you're trying to save money on equipment costs, either get your grain pre-crushed for you or get a Corona grain mill (or a knock-off), maybe find a used one on eBay.


                        Here's a new one similar to the Corona for about $41 shipped in the US:

                        <http://cgi.ebay. com/High- Hopper-CAST- IRON-GRAIN- CORN-Cereal- Mill-Grinder_ W0QQitemZ1303445 36221QQcmdZViewI temQQptZSmall_ Kitchen_Applianc es_US?hash= item1e5923c89d>

                        For a little more than double that price, you can get a mill that's not temperamental and is consistent. An entry level (and good) barley crusher is the cheaper Phil Mill:

                        <http://www.beer- wine.com/ product_info. asp?productID= 1064&sectionID= 1>

                        Reports are that this one even works better than the more expensive one, though it might be a little slower. But what's a few more minutes when your brew day will be several hours anyway? The hopper is provided by yourself: a 2 (or 3) liter bottle with the bottom cut out. It's an *adjustable* single roller grain mill. Some of the more expensive ones aren't even adjustable, though you may not even care since they all do a good enough job with both 2 and 6 row barley.

                        If initial cost is an issue, start out by paying the small charge for getting your grains pre-crushed. Some home brew supply stores don't even charge for this, and if you buy yours at a brick and mortar store you are probably allowed to crush your own grains using their equipment for free.

                        Don




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                      • t2000kwt
                        ... That s cheap! And it can be used for making flour out of various grains, too, if you wish to use it for its intended purpose. Not that we always use things
                        Message 11 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                          --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." <rrogers10@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I got a corona knock off at big lot for 14 bucks

                          That's cheap! And it can be used for making flour out of various grains, too, if you wish to use it for its intended purpose. Not that we always use things for what they were designed to do. :-)

                          Don
                        • David Harry
                          I would think a commercial coffee grinder would be every bit as good and faster than a corona mill.. I would certainly give it a try if I had one.. the best
                          Message 12 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                            I would think a commercial coffee grinder would be every bit as good and faster than a corona mill..  I would certainly give it a try if I had one..  the best thing would be to compare it to some you bought pre-crushed for consistency.. I wouldn't worry about the coffee flavor at all.  My understanding is the finer the crush, the better your efficiency, but the more problems you will have with sparging..
                             
                            David






                            From: t2000kwt <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                            To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Sat, January 2, 2010 12:24:30 PM
                            Subject: [BrewEquip] Re: RIMS or HERMS or?

                             

                            Personally, I wouldn't even waste my time with the coffee grinder. If you're trying to save money on equipment costs, either get your grain pre-crushed for you or get a Corona grain mill (or a knock-off), maybe find a used one on eBay.

                            Here's a new one similar to the Corona for about $41 shipped in the US:

                            <http://cgi.ebay. com/High- Hopper-CAST- IRON-GRAIN- CORN-Cereal- Mill-Grinder_ W0QQitemZ1303445 36221QQcmdZViewI temQQptZSmall_ Kitchen_Applianc es_US?hash= item1e5923c89d>

                            For a little more than double that price, you can get a mill that's not temperamental and is consistent. An entry level (and good) barley crusher is the cheaper Phil Mill:

                            <http://www.beer- wine.com/ product_info. asp?productID= 1064&sectionID= 1>

                            Reports are that this one even works better than the more expensive one, though it might be a little slower. But what's a few more minutes when your brew day will be several hours anyway? The hopper is provided by yourself: a 2 (or 3) liter bottle with the bottom cut out. It's an *adjustable* single roller grain mill. Some of the more expensive ones aren't even adjustable, though you may not even care since they all do a good enough job with both 2 and 6 row barley.

                            If initial cost is an issue, start out by paying the small charge for getting your grains pre-crushed. Some home brew supply stores don't even charge for this, and if you buy yours at a brick and mortar store you are probably allowed to crush your own grains using their equipment for free.

                            Don


                          • Denis Barsalo
                            And more likely tannin extraction giving the beer an astringent taste. The two best reasons to err on the coarse side of the crush is for better lautering and
                            Message 13 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                              And more likely tannin extraction giving the beer an astringent taste.
                              The two best reasons to err on the coarse side of the crush is for better lautering and less tannin extraction.
                               
                              If you err on the finer side of the crush, you will increase your efficiency but you may end up with a much slower sparge and more likely extracting grainy and astringent flavours from the grain.
                               
                              YMMV of course...
                               
                              Denis


                              From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of David Harry
                              Sent: January-02-10 6:37 PM
                              To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Re: RIMS or HERMS or?
                               
                              (snip)
                               
                               My understanding is the finer the crush, the better your efficiency, but the more problems you will have with sparging..
                            • Bob
                              The whole idea of crushing the grain is to keep the husks intact as much as possible. By doing this you decrease the problems of a stuck sparge and
                              Message 14 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                                The whole idea of "crushing" the grain is to keep the husks intact as
                                much as possible. By doing this you decrease the problems of a stuck
                                sparge and extracting excessive tannins. I have no experience with a
                                Corona mill but I've used a lot of coffee grinders. It's definitely not
                                the grind/crush you want for your grains.

                                You may want to also look at the Barley Crusher as an option. It's a
                                lot more expensive than the Corona mill but in the long run I think it
                                may give you a better crush and higher efficiencies without the fore
                                mentioned issues. Personally I use a Monster Mill three roller. It
                                works great but the cost is way more than I had planned for once I got
                                everything up and going. But man what a mill now that I have it going.

                                Bob O.
                              • Joe Strain aka Yodar
                                There is a Big   BUT !  You goal is to crack the hull and break the kernel so water can get into the grain to soak the endosperm and allow digestion to
                                Message 15 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                                  There is a Big   BUT ! 

                                  You goal is to crack the hull and break the kernel so water can get into the grain to soak the endosperm and allow digestion to proceed...it is NOT to make FLOUR




                                  Yodar
                                  words MEAN things





                                  "Scholarly debate about its various clauses has been non-stop since the document became the law of the land. But one aspect of the Constitution is beyond debate: it is a document entirely constructed to limit the power of the government, not the people."
                                  --Arnold Ahlert

                                  "The [U.S.] Constitution is a limitation on the government, not on private individuals ...
                                  it does not prescribe the conduct of private individuals, only the conduct of the
                                  government ... it is not a charter for government power, but a charter of the citizen's
                                  protection against the government." --author and philosopher Ayn Rand (1905-1982)

                                  --- On Sat, 1/2/10, David Harry <dvdhrry@...> wrote:

                                  From: David Harry <dvdhrry@...>
                                  Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Re: RIMS or HERMS or?
                                  To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                  Date: Saturday, January 2, 2010, 6:36 PM

                                   

                                  I would think a commercial coffee grinder would be every bit as good and faster than a corona mill..  I would certainly give it a try if I had one..  the best thing would be to compare it to some you bought pre-crushed for consistency. . I wouldn't worry about the coffee flavor at all.  My understanding is the finer the crush, the better your efficiency, but the more problems you will have with sparging..
                                   
                                  David






                                  From: t2000kwt <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com>
                                  To: BrewingEquipment@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Sent: Sat, January 2, 2010 12:24:30 PM
                                  Subject: [BrewEquip] Re: RIMS or HERMS or?

                                   

                                  Personally, I wouldn't even waste my time with the coffee grinder. If you're trying to save money on equipment costs, either get your grain pre-crushed for you or get a Corona grain mill (or a knock-off), maybe find a used one on eBay.

                                  Here's a new one similar to the Corona for about $41 shipped in the US:

                                  <http://cgi.ebay. com/High- Hopper-CAST- IRON-GRAIN- CORN-Cereal- Mill-Grinder_ W0QQitemZ1303445 36221QQcmdZViewI temQQptZSmall_ Kitchen_Applianc es_US?hash= item1e5923c89d>

                                  For a little more than double that price, you can get a mill that's not temperamental and is consistent. An entry level (and good) barley crusher is the cheaper Phil Mill:

                                  <http://www.beer- wine.com/ product_info. asp?productID= 1064&sectionID= 1>

                                  Reports are that this one even works better than the more expensive one, though it might be a little slower. But what's a few more minutes when your brew day will be several hours anyway? The hopper is provided by yourself: a 2 (or 3) liter bottle with the bottom cut out. It's an *adjustable* single roller grain mill. Some of the more expensive ones aren't even adjustable, though you may not even care since they all do a good enough job with both 2 and 6 row barley.

                                  If initial cost is an issue, start out by paying the small charge for getting your grains pre-crushed. Some home brew supply stores don't even charge for this, and if you buy yours at a brick and mortar store you are probably allowed to crush your own grains using their equipment for free.

                                  Don



                                • Tom
                                  The finer the crush the better you will get a stuck mash. You just want to crack the grain not make flour. Tom Home of the MOON RIVER BREWERY and DELANCO
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                                    The finer the crush the better you will get a stuck mash. You just want to "crack" the grain not make flour.
                                     
                                    Tom
                                            
                                              Home of the
                                    MOON RIVER BREWERY
                                                     and
                                    DELANCO VINEYARDS
                                     




                                    --- On Sat, 1/2/10, David Harry <dvdhrry@...> wrote:

                                    From: David Harry <dvdhrry@...>
                                    Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Re: RIMS or HERMS or?
                                    To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Saturday, January 2, 2010, 6:36 PM

                                     

                                    I would think a commercial coffee grinder would be every bit as good and faster than a corona mill..  I would certainly give it a try if I had one..  the best thing would be to compare it to some you bought pre-crushed for consistency. . I wouldn't worry about the coffee flavor at all.  My understanding is the finer the crush, the better your efficiency, but the more problems you will have with sparging..
                                     
                                    David






                                    From: t2000kwt <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com>
                                    To: BrewingEquipment@ yahoogroups. com
                                    Sent: Sat, January 2, 2010 12:24:30 PM
                                    Subject: [BrewEquip] Re: RIMS or HERMS or?

                                     

                                    Personally, I wouldn't even waste my time with the coffee grinder. If you're trying to save money on equipment costs, either get your grain pre-crushed for you or get a Corona grain mill (or a knock-off), maybe find a used one on eBay.

                                    Here's a new one similar to the Corona for about $41 shipped in the US:

                                    <http://cgi.ebay. com/High- Hopper-CAST- IRON-GRAIN- CORN-Cereal- Mill-Grinder_ W0QQitemZ1303445 36221QQcmdZViewI temQQptZSmall_ Kitchen_Applianc es_US?hash= item1e5923c89d>

                                    For a little more than double that price, you can get a mill that's not temperamental and is consistent. An entry level (and good) barley crusher is the cheaper Phil Mill:

                                    <http://www.beer- wine.com/ product_info. asp?productID= 1064&sectionID= 1>

                                    Reports are that this one even works better than the more expensive one, though it might be a little slower. But what's a few more minutes when your brew day will be several hours anyway? The hopper is provided by yourself: a 2 (or 3) liter bottle with the bottom cut out. It's an *adjustable* single roller grain mill. Some of the more expensive ones aren't even adjustable, though you may not even care since they all do a good enough job with both 2 and 6 row barley.

                                    If initial cost is an issue, start out by paying the small charge for getting your grains pre-crushed. Some home brew supply stores don't even charge for this, and if you buy yours at a brick and mortar store you are probably allowed to crush your own grains using their equipment for free.

                                    Don



                                  • Denis Barsalo
                                    Same experience here with the three roller Monster. It was a Christmas present to myself last year. I don t regret getting it but it was a pain to assemble,
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                                      Same experience here with the three roller Monster.
                                      It was a Christmas present to myself last year.
                                      I don't regret getting it but it was a pain to assemble, motorize and
                                      install into my brewery.

                                      Now that it's in place, I love it. But you're right about the $$$$$$$

                                      At least I got $50 for my old Phil Mill I when I sold it to a fellow
                                      homebrewer.
                                      I understand he just sold it to someone else for $40 after inheriting an old
                                      Valley Mill.
                                      Now there was a great mill. Ready to roll out of the box! :-)

                                      Denis

                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                      [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bob
                                      Sent: January-02-10 7:26 PM
                                      To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [BrewEquip] Re: RIMS or HERMS or?

                                      The whole idea of "crushing" the grain is to keep the husks intact as
                                      much as possible. By doing this you decrease the problems of a stuck
                                      sparge and extracting excessive tannins. I have no experience with a
                                      Corona mill but I've used a lot of coffee grinders. It's definitely not
                                      the grind/crush you want for your grains.

                                      You may want to also look at the Barley Crusher as an option. It's a
                                      lot more expensive than the Corona mill but in the long run I think it
                                      may give you a better crush and higher efficiencies without the fore
                                      mentioned issues. Personally I use a Monster Mill three roller. It
                                      works great but the cost is way more than I had planned for once I got
                                      everything up and going. But man what a mill now that I have it going.

                                      Bob O.
                                    • t2000kwt
                                      ... I love mine. I bought it used, I think for $105 on eBay a few years ago. I am happy enough with it that I am not interested in getting a faster working
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Jan 2, 2010
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                                        --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, "Denis Barsalo" <dbarsalo@...> wrote:

                                        > At least I got $50 for my old Phil Mill I when I sold it to a fellow
                                        > homebrewer.
                                        > I understand he just sold it to someone else for $40 after inheriting an old
                                        > Valley Mill.
                                        > Now there was a great mill. Ready to roll out of the box! :-)
                                        >
                                        > Denis


                                        I love mine. I bought it used, I think for $105 on eBay a few years ago. I am happy enough with it that I am not interested in getting a faster working mill, and it is adjustable, though the amount of adjustment I make is minimal between 2 and 6 row grains. Jack Schmidling, maker of the mill with the same name, says you don't really need more than one pre-set setting, but he sells the variable gap mill for those who like to fiddle with things or feel it is a necessary option to have. He also has a stainless roller option, and I think his products come with a lifetime guarantee. If my Valley mill broke, I would probably buy one of his mills, though there are others that do a great job also.

                                        If someone is looking for a grain mill, it pays to watch eBay and Craigslist (in several cities around where you live) and just be patient. You'll probably see what you're looking for if you can wait a while, assuming it's not out of production like the Valley Mill. I'm surprises that no one bought the rights to produce it again. It may not be the "best" mill ever made, but it is a good one. And best really depends on what you are wanting in a mill. What's best for someone strapped for cash will be different than for someone who wants to build a motorized setup and doesn't mind paying out some cash for a high-throughput mill.

                                        Don
                                      • Ric Cunningham
                                        I have used a Corona mill for 7 years now and just got my Barley Crusher this week. I like the BC because is comes installed with a hopper which is a major
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Jan 3, 2010
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                                          I have used a Corona mill for 7 years now and just got my Barley Crusher this week. I like the BC because is comes installed with a hopper which is a major plus for me. I will keep my corona for making wheat beers, I hate to change a setting on something once it works and the corona will be great for wheat malt. The big issue with coffee grinder is that they pulverize the husk, this is the issue with stuck sparges and tannin/polyphenol extraction. I am not worried about motorizing the BC since I use a drill to run the system. I have a motor but getting the gear box required and mounting everything will not make it portable anymore and being a very mobile brewer this is important. I do many demonstrations outside of my brewery a year and the ability to get up and go is important to me. As always YMMV. 

                                          On Sat, Jan 2, 2010 at 8:36 PM, t2000kwt <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                                           



                                          --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, "Denis Barsalo" <dbarsalo@...> wrote:

                                          > At least I got $50 for my old Phil Mill I when I sold it to a fellow
                                          > homebrewer.
                                          > I understand he just sold it to someone else for $40 after inheriting an old
                                          > Valley Mill.
                                          > Now there was a great mill. Ready to roll out of the box! :-)
                                          >
                                          > Denis

                                          I love mine. I bought it used, I think for $105 on eBay a few years ago. I am happy enough with it that I am not interested in getting a faster working mill, and it is adjustable, though the amount of adjustment I make is minimal between 2 and 6 row grains. Jack Schmidling, maker of the mill with the same name, says you don't really need more than one pre-set setting, but he sells the variable gap mill for those who like to fiddle with things or feel it is a necessary option to have. He also has a stainless roller option, and I think his products come with a lifetime guarantee. If my Valley mill broke, I would probably buy one of his mills, though there are others that do a great job also.

                                          If someone is looking for a grain mill, it pays to watch eBay and Craigslist (in several cities around where you live) and just be patient. You'll probably see what you're looking for if you can wait a while, assuming it's not out of production like the Valley Mill. I'm surprises that no one bought the rights to produce it again. It may not be the "best" mill ever made, but it is a good one. And best really depends on what you are wanting in a mill. What's best for someone strapped for cash will be different than for someone who wants to build a motorized setup and doesn't mind paying out some cash for a high-throughput mill.

                                          Don




                                          --
                                          Ric Cunningham
                                          Wilypig Brewing
                                          "If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make great beer."
                                          Niagara Association of Homebrewers Competitions Coordinator
                                        • Bob
                                          While building your HERMS on a Budget system you ll likely use some brass fittings. While legally all of these types of fittings are lead-free technically
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Jan 3, 2010
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                                            While building your HERMS on a Budget system you'll likely use some
                                            brass fittings. While legally all of these types of fittings are
                                            lead-free technically they still contain a very small percentage of
                                            lead. If you want to take the extra precaution you can remove any
                                            surface lead by soaking the fittings in a 2 to 1 solution of 5% acid
                                            vinegar and 3% Hydrogen Peroxide, respectively, for about 5 minutes.
                                            The brass will change to a slightly buttery yellow appearance. If the
                                            solution starts to look green or blue than it has soaked to long and
                                            it's releasing copper. The Peroxide is used up at this point and the
                                            process is exposing more lead. You'll have to make more solution and do
                                            it again but not for as long.

                                            Bob O.
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