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  • surfsupks
    Will old Santa came thru and gave me a new digital scale now I m More dangerous. How much Priming sugar do you use for one gallon of beer. Has anybody tried
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 2, 2006
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      Will old Santa came thru and gave me a new digital scale now I'm More
      dangerous.

      How much Priming sugar do you use for one gallon of beer.

      Has anybody tried priming drops such as Coopers. one drop per 12 oz
      bottle. I have tried them and the jury is still out.

      I usually buy the pre packs of priming sugar that state on the label
      that is measure by volume such as 3/4 cup. After weight several pack
      it works out at four oz for five gallons of beer. Now taking my shoes
      off (have to use my toes I came up with this measurement of weight.

      4 oz div by 5 = 0.8 oz (oz to grams) x 28.3495 = 22.679 grams or
      round up to 23 grams per gallon. Right or Wrong? What I like to do
      is bottle two gallons and keg three and don't want to add primeing
      sugar to the beer going into the keg.

      So step up to the bar and put in your two cents.

      Kansas Swagman
      Its never too Early Only Late
    • Patrick Tan
      This Bulk Priming Calculator is very handy. Also you may read an easy to follow guide here. surfsupks wrote: Will old Santa came thru and
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 2, 2006
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        This Bulk Priming Calculator is very handy.
        Also you may read an easy to follow guide here.

        surfsupks <SURFSUPKS@...> wrote:
        Will old Santa came thru and gave me a new digital scale now I'm More
        dangerous.

        How much Priming sugar do you use for one gallon of beer.

        Has anybody tried priming drops such as Coopers. one drop per 12 oz
        bottle. I have tried them and the jury is still out.

        I usually buy the pre packs of priming sugar that state on the label
        that is measure by volume such as 3/4 cup. After weight several pack
        it works out at four oz for five gallons of beer. Now taking my shoes
        off (have to use my toes I came up with this measurement of weight.

        4 oz div by 5 = 0.8 oz (oz to grams) x 28.3495 = 22.679 grams or
        round up to 23 grams per gallon.  Right or Wrong?  What I like to do
        is bottle two gallons and keg three and don't want to add primeing
        sugar to the beer going into the keg.

        So step up to the bar and put in your two cents.

        Kansas Swagman
        Its never too Early Only Late







        Yahoo! for Good - Make a difference this year.

      • surfsupks
        ... us in your email signature line, and add a link to us on your website. THANKS! ... Service. Thanks for the info that is a great site and the Bulk Priming
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 5, 2006
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          --- In BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com, Patrick Tan


          <pt_chopper@y...> wrote:
          >
          > This Bulk Priming Calculator is very handy.
          > Also you may read an easy to follow guide here.
          >
          >> More members means more expertise! Please invite friends, mention
          us in your email signature line, and add a link to us on your
          website. THANKS!
          >
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          Service.

          Thanks for the info that is a great site and the Bulk Priming
          Calculator is great. But this brings up another question that might
          be the cause of my over carb on some bottle beers. I have never took
          in the fact of temperture of the beer at bottling. I have been cold
          storage for clairty and most keg and force carb. But some time's like
          a few bottles.

          Using the calculator say a American Pale is 2.2- 2.8 and the middle
          target would be 2.5. If the beer is at 40 degrees F the residual CO2
          is 1.46 and calls for 79.1 G's of corn sugar. But if you primed the
          hold five gallons with todays standard pack of 3/4 cup of sugar
          wouldn't the beer be overcarb?

          The calculator would say at 60F the residual is 0.99 CO2 and the
          amount of sugar would be 115.0 G's or close to 4.0 oz which is an
          average of 3/4 cup.
          So using 3/4 cup of sugar in five gallons at a temp say at 40 degrees
          the bottle will become overcarb. Is this the reason I come up with
          overcarb bottle beer at times because I used the amount of sugar for
          60 degrees but the beer is at 40 degrees and holds more residual CO2.
          Or am I all wet.

          Kansas Swagman
          Its never too Early Only Late
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