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Re: [BrewEquip] Hand Pump Methodology

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  • Mark Wedge
    Use a cask breather and set your regulator to about 5 psi. http://www.ukbrewing.com/sundries.cfm I have one and it works just fine. -mark
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 1, 2007
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      Use a cask breather and set your regulator to about 5 psi.
       
      I have one and it works just fine.
       
      -mark
       
       

      > That would take care of any beasties in the air but it would still let
      > your biggest enemy of all into your keg or cask: oxygen. No problem if
      > you're going to polish off the keg in a few days but any longer than 
      > that and all your hard work brewing is going to be seriously compromised.

      > So far from all the suggestions, it sounds like the only sure fire way
      > of doing it is to have a dedicated regulator set at 1 psi (or less if
      > possible) and turned on and off as needed. Hmmmmm, sure wish there was a
      > better way.
      >
      > Bob

    • Berggren, Stefan
      You can even make your own with a low pressure propane regulator found at many hardware centers for about 10 bucks ! This is what I use and have experienced no
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 1, 2007
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        Message
        You can even make your own with a low pressure propane regulator found at many hardware centers for about 10 bucks !
         
        This is what I use and have experienced no problems with my pin and using them with Cornies....
         
        just keep it about a 1.5 feet to 2 feet lower than your beer engine
         
        Stefan Berggren
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark Wedge
        Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2007 9:32 AM
        To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Hand Pump Methodology

        Use a cask breather and set your regulator to about 5 psi.
         
        I have one and it works just fine.
         
        -mark
         
         

        > That would take care of any beasties in the air but it would still let
        > your biggest enemy of all into your keg or cask: oxygen. No problem if
        > you're going to polish off the keg in a few days but any longer than 
        > that and all your hard work brewing is going to be seriously compromised.

        > So far from all the suggestions, it sounds like the only sure fire way
        > of doing it is to have a dedicated regulator set at 1 psi (or less if
        > possible) and turned on and off as needed. Hmmmmm, sure wish there was a
        > better way.
        >
        > Bob

      • Bill Velek
        ... Sounds like what you need is something that you can fill with the same volume of CO2, and then let it feed the cask as needed at close to atmospheric
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 1, 2007
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          Robert Tower wrote:

          > That would take care of any beasties in the air but it would still let
          > your biggest enemy of all into your keg or cask: oxygen. No problem if
          > you're going to polish off the keg in a few days but any longer than
          > that and all your hard work brewing is going to be seriously compromised.
          >
          > So far from all the suggestions, it sounds like the only sure fire way
          > of doing it is to have a dedicated regulator set at 1 psi (or less if
          > possible) and turned on and off as needed. Hmmmmm, sure wish there was a
          > better way.

          Sounds like what you need is something that you can fill with the same
          volume of CO2, and then let it feed the cask as needed at close to
          atmospheric pressure. If storage isn't a problem, maybe you could run a
          hose to a plastic bag that is filled with CO2 in the same volume as your
          cask, and then the cask will draw in CO2 as needed and cause the bag to
          collapse as it is eventually emptied. You could store the bag in a
          small cabinet or box on top of or next to your frig. The problem might
          be that the plastic bag, even if tightly sealed, might still allow CO2
          out or oxygen in through the plastic itself, but with the bag being
          filled at atmospheric pressure, I don't know how much a problem that
          would be. I'm sure we have some chemists and engineers here who can
          figure that out. Possibly you could source a mylar bag somewhere that
          might work better. Just my thoughts; never tried anything like this.

          Cheers.

          Bill Velek - PERSONAL sites = www.velek.com & www.2plus2is4.com
          280+ member group just for Growing Hops: www.tinyurl.com/3au2uv
          NEW group just for Homebrewing Supplies: www.tinyurl.com/2wnang
          Join 'Homebrewers' to Help Cure Disease: www.tinyurl.com/yjlnyv
        • Kevin Rury
          I think Robert might have hit the nail on the head. You can buy bladder tanks used for RO systems on EBAY fairly cheap the standard tank is 3 gallons. You
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 1, 2007
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            I think Robert might have hit the nail on the head. You can buy bladder tanks used for RO systems on EBAY fairly cheap the standard tank is 3 gallons. You charge up the static pressure side with air to about 2-3 pounds and as you fill the tank with CO2 the bladder expands until it is full. When you draw off beer with the beer engine CO2 will displace the beer in the cask. They cost about $30 and are food grade.  I would use a check valve to prevent back flow.

             

            http://cgi.ebay.com/REVERSE-OSMOSIS-DI-4-gallon-Bladder-tank-Only-39-99_W0QQitemZ250129007165QQihZ015QQcategoryZ46310QQcmdZViewItem#ebayphotohosting

            -----Original Message-----
            From: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Velek
            Sent:
            Wednesday, August 01, 2007 3:15 PM
            To: BrewingEquipment@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [BrewEquip] Hand Pump Methodology

             

            Robert Tower wrote:

            > That would take care of any beasties in the air but it would still let
            > your biggest enemy of all into your keg or cask: oxygen. No problem if
            > you're going to polish off the keg in a few days but any longer than
            > that and all your hard work brewing is going to be seriously compromised.
            >
            > So far from all the suggestions, it sounds like the only sure fire way
            > of doing it is to have a dedicated regulator set at 1 psi (or less if
            > possible) and turned on and off as needed. Hmmmmm, sure wish there was a
            > better way.

            Sounds like what you need is something that you can fill with the same
            volume of CO2, and then let it feed the cask as needed at close to
            atmospheric pressure. If storage isn't a problem, maybe you could run a
            hose to a plastic bag that is filled with CO2 in the same volume as your
            cask, and then the cask will draw in CO2 as needed and cause the bag to
            collapse as it is eventually emptied. You could store the bag in a
            small cabinet or box on top of or next to your frig. The problem might
            be that the plastic bag, even if tightly sealed, might still allow CO2
            out or oxygen in through the plastic itself, but with the bag being
            filled at atmospheric pressure, I don't know how much a problem that
            would be. I'm sure we have some chemists and engineers here who can
            figure that out. Possibly you could source a mylar bag somewhere that
            might work better. Just my thoughts; never tried anything like this.

            Cheers.

            Bill Velek - PERSONAL sites = www.velek.com & www.2plus2is4. com
            280+ member group just for Growing Hops: www.tinyurl. com/3au2uv
            NEW group just for Homebrewing Supplies: www.tinyurl. com/2wnang
            Join 'Homebrewers' to Help Cure Disease: www.tinyurl. com/yjlnyv


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          • Bill Velek
            ... snip I don t know how they work, but is there any reason to put any pressure at all on the static pressure side if the valve can be removed and/or left
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 2, 2007
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              Kevin Rury wrote:

              > I think Robert might have hit the nail on the head. You can buy bladder
              > tanks used for RO systems on EBAY fairly cheap the standard tank is 3
              > gallons. You charge up the static pressure side with air to about 2-3
              > pounds and as you fill the tank with CO2 the bladder expands until it is
              > full. When you draw off beer with the beer engine CO2 will displace the
              > beer in the cask. They cost about $30 and are food grade. I would use a
              > check valve to prevent back flow.

              snip

              I don't know how they work, but is there any reason to put any pressure
              at all on the 'static pressure side' if the valve can be removed and/or
              left open? Wouldn't the beer machine cause enough suction for it to
              just collapse?

              Also, the thought occurred to me that there are those five gallon
              collapsible water containers that campers use; they would be more
              durable than a simple plastic bag, but a lot cheaper than the bladder
              that you've suggested, although once again I don't know if that type of
              plastic is permeable by oxygen. I suppose one difficulty would be in
              squeezing every last bit of oxygen out of it, so the bladder would be
              superior in that respect.

              Cheers.

              Bill Velek - PERSONAL sites = www.velek.com & www.2plus2is4.com
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