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Free Download Alert 17APR17

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  • xs750rider
    Hi Boxsters, Tomorrow is the day that American tax-payers must have their returns submitted for 2016 taxes. As a service to those who suffer from this, the
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 17, 2017

      Hi Boxsters,

      Tomorrow is the day that American tax-payers must have their returns submitted for 2016 taxes.

      As a service to those who suffer from this, the Boxart Den has come to brighten your day.

      This week the Chairman has selected one of the coolest boxarts ever done.

      The FD is the Hasegawa art that graced their release of a plane that never was!

      At the very end of WWII, Japan was wilting under the constant pressure applied by B-29 raids.

      As a possible solution, the Imperial Japanese Navy contracted with a small aircraft company, Kyushu, to design a plane that might turn the tide.

      That was the origin of the Kyushu J7W1 Shinden.

      The Shinden (Magnificent Lightning) was an most unusual design for that era.

      The wings were placed at the rear of the fuselage and small canards were up front for stability.

      The engine was in the very rear with a six bladed pusher prop.

      The first flight was a few days before the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.

      Only two were completed before the war ended..

      One was scrapped and the other is in pieces at the Smithsonian NASM.

      The boxart depicts a WWII PTO '46 design of the Shinden if it had been fitted with a jet engine.

      We know that the Germans shared their jet technology with Japan and who knows what may have happened if the war had not ended when it did.

      From my archives and the web I collected every acceptable photo of the J7W1.

      Some of the photos may actually be clever images of models, I can't be sure.

      All the images are 1280 pixels.

      Get them @ http://www.boxartden.com/FD/

      Jean

    • J.R.
      Jean, Thanks for the cool boxart of an almost-forgotten design. Anyone ever see any reports on how the two that were built performed? It s also a big strange
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 17, 2017
        Jean,

        Thanks for the cool boxart of an almost-forgotten design. Anyone ever see any reports on how the two that were built performed? It's also a big strange that Hasegawa chose to do a model of the never-built jet engine version, as I think the prop in the rear end makes for a more interesting model -- not that it isn't interesting enough with that weird rear-mounted wing/tail/whatevertheheck it is.

        -- J.R.

        jfa23@... [Box-Art] wrote:

        Hi Boxsters,

        Tomorrow is the day that American tax-payers must have their returns submitted for 2016 taxes.

        As a service to those who suffer from this, the Boxart Den has come to brighten your day.

        This week the Chairman has selected one of the coolest boxarts ever done.

        The FD is the Hasegawa art that graced their release of a plane that never was!

        At the very end of WWII, Japan was wilting under the constant pressure applied by B-29 raids.

        As a possible solution, the Imperial Japanese Navy contracted with a small aircraft company, Kyushu, to design a plane that might turn the tide.

        That was the origin of the Kyushu J7W1 Shinden.

        The Shinden (Magnificent Lightning) was an most unusual design for that era.

        The wings were placed at the rear of the fuselage and small canards were up front for stability.

        The engine was in the very rear with a six bladed pusher prop.

        The first flight was a few days before the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.

        Only two were completed before the war ended..

        One was scrapped and the other is in pieces at the Smithsonian NASM.

        The boxart depicts a WWII PTO '46 design of the Shinden if it had been fitted with a jet engine.

        We know that the Germans shared their jet technology with Japan and who knows what may have happened if the war had not ended when it did.

        From my archives and the web I collected every acceptable photo of the J7W1.

        Some of the photos may actually be clever images of models, I can't be sure.

        All the images are 1280 pixels.

        Get them @ http://www.boxartden.com/FD/

        Jean


        Virus-free. www.avg.com
      • C. Bibbee
        J.R.; The prop setup was purely for early flight tests, a lot like the Germans did with an early prototype Me-262. That one had a tailwheel gear and two dummy
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 17, 2017
          J.R.;

          The prop setup was purely for early flight tests, a lot like the Germans did with an early prototype Me-262. That one had a tailwheel gear and two dummy nacelles with ballast in them to simulate the mass of the jet engines. What that plus the second prototype 262 with actual Jumo jet engines but still a tail-dragger proved to them was that they'd better change the design to a nosewheel gear.

          The Japanese also used a piston engine to try to test-fly a carrier-based jet attack bomber, the Yokosuka R2Y-2, but they hadn't gotten it finished before Aug 10 '45. It would have been a twin-engine in the same class as the later English Electric Canberra or Ilyushin Il-28, but probably with less warload and lower performance due to less powerful engines.

          Sincerely,

          Carl B.


          On Monday, April 17, 2017 5:53 PM, "'J.R.' jrlist@... [Box-Art]" <Box-Art@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


           
          Jean,

          Thanks for the cool boxart of an almost-forgotten design. Anyone ever see any reports on how the two that were built performed? It's also a big strange that Hasegawa chose to do a model of the never-built jet engine version, as I think the prop in the rear end makes for a more interesting model -- not that it isn't interesting enough with that weird rear-mounted wing/tail/whatevertheheck it is.

          -- J.R.

          jfa23@... [Box-Art] wrote:
          Hi Boxsters,
          Tomorrow is the day that American tax-payers must have their returns submitted for 2016 taxes.
          As a service to those who suffer from this, the Boxart Den has come to brighten your day.
          This week the Chairman has selected one of the coolest boxarts ever done.
          The FD is the Hasegawa art that graced their release of a plane that never was!
          At the very end of WWII, Japan was wilting under the constant pressure applied by B-29 raids.
          As a possible solution, the Imperial Japanese Navy contracted with a small aircraft company, Kyushu, to design a plane that might turn the tide.
          That was the origin of the Kyushu J7W1 Shinden.
          The Shinden (Magnificent Lightning) was an most unusual design for that era.
          The wings were placed at the rear of the fuselage and small canards were up front for stability.
          The engine was in the very rear with a six bladed pusher prop.
          The first flight was a few days before the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.
          Only two were completed before the war ended..
          One was scrapped and the other is in pieces at the Smithsonian NASM.
          The boxart depicts a WWII PTO '46 design of the Shinden if it had been fitted with a jet engine.
          We know that the Germans shared their jet technology with Japan and who knows what may have happened if the war had not ended when it did.
          From my archives and the web I collected every acceptable photo of the J7W1.
          Some of the photos may actually be clever images of models, I can't be sure.
          All the images are 1280 pixels.
          Jean

          Virus-free. www.avg.com


        • Robert Eleazer
          Jean: I built a 1/72 scale Shinden back in the 60 s the product of a Japanese company with a name I have forgotten. My brother and I walked into a dimestore
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 17, 2017
            
            Jean:
             
            I built a 1/72 scale Shinden back in the 60's the product of a Japanese company with a name I have forgotten.  My brother and I walked into a dimestore one day and were blown away with all these kits of Japanese airplanes we had never heard of; the Shinden was one.
             
            I did not know about the jet Shinden but I wonder where they would have put enough fuel into it to be able to get out of the traffic pattern.  Looks like it would be only slightly better than the Me-163 when it came to range.
             
            I have thought for a long time that a jet version of the XP-55 would be super-cool.  But it would have the fuel problem, too.  Take a look at the old Hawk instruction sheet for the T-33A and see how many fuel tanks it had.
             
            Thanks!

            Robert
              
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Monday, April 17, 2017 11:00 AM
            Subject: [Box-Art] Free Download Alert 17APR17

             

            Hi Boxsters,

            Tomorrow is the day that American tax-payers must have their returns submitted for 2016 taxes.

            As a service to those who suffer from this, the Boxart Den has come to brighten your day.

            This week the Chairman has selected one of the coolest boxarts ever done.

            The FD is the Hasegawa art that graced their release of a plane that never was!

            At the very end of WWII, Japan was wilting under the constant pressure applied by B-29 raids.

            As a possible solution, the Imperial Japanese Navy contracted with a small aircraft company, Kyushu, to design a plane that might turn the tide.

            That was the origin of the Kyushu J7W1 Shinden.

            The Shinden (Magnificent Lightning) was an most unusual design for that era.

            The wings were placed at the rear of the fuselage and small canards were up front for stability.

            The engine was in the very rear with a six bladed pusher prop.

            The first flight was a few days before the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.

            Only two were completed before the war ended..

            One was scrapped and the other is in pieces at the Smithsonian NASM.

            The boxart depicts a WWII PTO '46 design of the Shinden if it had been fitted with a jet engine.

            We know that the Germans shared their jet technology with Japan and who knows what may have happened if the war had not ended when it did.

            From my archives and the web I collected every acceptable photo of the J7W1.

            Some of the photos may actually be clever images of models, I can't be sure.

            All the images are 1280 pixels.

            Get them @ http://www.boxartden.com/FD/

            Jean

            No virus found in this message.
            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            Version: 2016.0.8012 / Virus Database: 4769/14336 - Release Date: 04/17/17

          • ABU625
            Jean: Loved the Shinden design -- and the Hasegawa box art. Thanks for sharing. - Allen B. Ury ... From: J.R. jrlist@thepostalzone.com [Box-Art]
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 17, 2017
              Jean:

              Loved the Shinden design -- and the Hasegawa box art. Thanks for sharing.

              - Allen B. Ury



              -----Original Message-----
              From: 'J.R.' jrlist@... [Box-Art] <Box-Art@yahoogroups.com>
              To: Box-Art <Box-Art@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Mon, Apr 17, 2017 3:53 pm
              Subject: Re: [Box-Art] Free Download Alert 17APR17

               
              Jean,

              Thanks for the cool boxart of an almost-forgotten design. Anyone ever see any reports on how the two that were built performed? It's also a big strange that Hasegawa chose to do a model of the never-built jet engine version, as I think the prop in the rear end makes for a more interesting model -- not that it isn't interesting enough with that weird rear-mounted wing/tail/whatevertheheck it is.

              -- J.R.

              jfa23@... [Box-Art] wrote:
              Hi Boxsters,
              Tomorrow is the day that American tax-payers must have their returns submitted for 2016 taxes.
              As a service to those who suffer from this, the Boxart Den has come to brighten your day.
              This week the Chairman has selected one of the coolest boxarts ever done.
              The FD is the Hasegawa art that graced their release of a plane that never was!
              At the very end of WWII, Japan was wilting under the constant pressure applied by B-29 raids.
              As a possible solution, the Imperial Japanese Navy contracted with a small aircraft company, Kyushu, to design a plane that might turn the tide.
              That was the origin of the Kyushu J7W1 Shinden.
              The Shinden (Magnificent Lightning) was an most unusual design for that era.
              The wings were placed at the rear of the fuselage and small canards were up front for stability.
              The engine was in the very rear with a six bladed pusher prop.
              The first flight was a few days before the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.
              Only two were completed before the war ended..
              One was scrapped and the other is in pieces at the Smithsonian NASM.
              The boxart depicts a WWII PTO '46 design of the Shinden if it had been fitted with a jet engine.
              We know that the Germans shared their jet technology with Japan and who knows what may have happened if the war had not ended when it did.
              From my archives and the web I collected every acceptable photo of the J7W1.
              Some of the photos may actually be clever images of models, I can't be sure.
              All the images are 1280 pixels.
              Jean

              Virus-free. www.avg.com
            • rnelson898
              That would have been the UPC kit, which was listed in their 1/100 Pocket series of kits. I built one about the same time (probably) and loved the
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 17, 2017
                That would have been the UPC kit, which was listed in their 1/100 'Pocket' series of kits.  I built one about the same time (probably) and loved the weirdness of it.
                 
                Rick
                 
                In a message dated 4/17/2017 6:51:24 P.M. Central Daylight Time, Box-Art@yahoogroups.com writes:
                 
                I built a 1/72 scale Shinden back in the 60's the product of a Japanese company with a name I have forgotten.
              • Robert Eleazer
                Yes, I think that would have been the one. I recall the box was mostly white, like the UPS kits of that era. Do not recall what the other kits were but they
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 17, 2017
                  Yes, I think that would have been the one.  I recall the box was mostly white, like the UPS kits of that era.  Do not recall what the other kits were but they were Japanese airplanes I never heard of also.  It was like visiting an alternate universe!
                   
                  Robert
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Monday, April 17, 2017 9:17 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Box-Art] Free Download Alert 17APR17

                   

                  That would have been the UPC kit, which was listed in their 1/100 'Pocket' series of kits.  I built one about the same time (probably) and loved the weirdness of it.
                   
                  Rick
                   
                  In a message dated 4/17/2017 6:51:24 P.M. Central Daylight Time, Box-Art@yahoogroups.com writes:
                   
                  I built a 1/72 scale Shinden back in the 60's the product of a Japanese company with a name I have forgotten.

                  No virus found in this message.
                  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  Version: 2016.0.8012 / Virus Database: 4769/14336 - Release Date: 04/17/17

                • john_braungart
                  Both Hasegawa and Tamiya made models of the J7W1 in 1:72 scale. In addition, there was another Japanese company called Farpro that I only saw sold I Quebec
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 18, 2017
                    Both Hasegawa and Tamiya made models of the J7W1 in 1:72 scale. In addition, there was another Japanese company called Farpro that I only saw sold I Quebec that might have made one as well. Farpro also made a lot of other oddball Japanese WWII aircraft.

                    Regards,
                    John Braungart
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