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Re: [Box-Art] "Mail Call"-B-52 Stratofortress

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  • C. Bibbee
    Christian;    LOL. Catching Gunny in mistakes is one of my guilty pleasures. If you think he gets things wrong about aircraft, don t get me started on his
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 1, 2009
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      Christian;
       
       LOL. Catching "Gunny" in mistakes is one of my guilty pleasures. If you think he gets things wrong about aircraft, don't get me started on his bobbles on firearms history.
       
       "Lock-N'-Load", his new show on small arms and artillery, promises to be very interesting from that standpoint.
       
       I taped that whole marathon yesterday (I'm "house-sitting" for a friend that's out of town, including making sure his favorite TV shows get recorded). Now I have another reason to anticipate watching it. Thanks! :-)
       
       Personal note about History Channel documentaries; the Revell-Monogram 1/48 B-29 model used in the HC doc "Stealing the Superfortress" (re the genesis of the Russian Tu-4 "Bull" bomber, their first A-bomb carrier) was built by Thomas Kipp, a multiple award-winning modeler who was a member of our local model club and a friend of mine.
       
       Sadly, we lost Tom last year in an accident at his home.  A bit of very serious advice; never, EVER work under a car up on ramps or (especially) jackstands without someone else around. Doing so resulted in Tom's death (due to jackstand collapse), and in 1965 a similar situation (with ramps) very nearly killed my father. Bad idea, trust me.
       
       (My definition of the proper way to do it? Take it to your local garage and let them do it, on their hydraulic lift.)
       
                                                                                                          Sincerely,
       
                                                                                                          Carl B.

      --- On Sat, 8/1/09, Christian Bryan <craviola880@...> wrote:

      From: Christian Bryan <craviola880@...>
      Subject: [Box-Art] "Mail Call"-B-52 Stratofortress
      To: Box-Art@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, August 1, 2009, 2:46 AM

       
      Just watched this re-run from 2005 for the first time last night. R Lee Ermey made no less than SEVENTEEN mistakes talking about the airplane throughout the hour!!! :-?

      "Frustration junction, what's that's function"??? Was pulling my hair out the whole time. Why History, or Discovery doesn't consult Carl Bibbee, or Matt Mattingley on these docus, is BEYOND me!! ;-)

      Needless to say, I didn't "Drop and give him 20".

      Criminy sakes...

      Christian

    • John P. Braungart
      ... Carl - If you ~do~ insist on doing it, here s a 1930s tip from my dad. Back in the day, backyard mechanics would get an old stump, say 15 high and about
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 1, 2009
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        --- In Box-Art@yahoogroups.com, "C. Bibbee" <quadgop2000@...> wrote:

        >  Sadly, we lost Tom last year in an accident at his home. A bit of
        > very serious advice; never, EVER work under a car up on ramps or
        > (especially) jackstands without someone else around. Doing so
        > resulted in Tom's death (due to jackstand collapse), and in 1965 a
        > similar situation (with ramps) very nearly killed my father. Bad
        > idea, trust me.
        >  (My definition of the proper way to do it? Take it to your local garage and let them do it, on their hydraulic lift.)
        >                                Sincerely,

        Carl - If you ~do~ insist on doing it, here's a 1930s tip from my dad. Back in the day, backyard mechanics would get an old stump, say 15" high and about 18" in diameter and screw of nail it to a piece of 3/4" plywood about 24"x24". Drill a hole in opposite corners and knot a rope through each of the holes.
        With the economy the way it is nowadays, a lot more guys are changing their own oil and plugs because of the cost.
        When you have to jack up the car (say to change the oil or whatever), toss one of the ropes under the car with enough force to come out the opposite end. Then pull the rope and drag the stump under the axle. Use the rope at the other end to "fine tune" the stump and later to pull the stump back out.
        NEVER go underneath the car until the stump is in place. I also know some guys who will also lower the car so that the stump is in contact with the axle. This will prevent the jack from slipping unless you accidentally kick it. Having the stump there also gives you room to go in on a creeper.
        Regards, -- John P.   
      • viking010@yahoo.com
                I can
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 1, 2009
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          <<A bit of very serious advice; never, EVER work under a car up on ramps
              or (especially) jackstands without someone else around.>>
           
          I can second this as I almost lost a finger this way working on my orange Audi '74 LS when I was 16 back in the summer of 1984.  (Yes, I'm young, relatively.)
           
          We were changing the rear brake pads or shoes.  Fortunately my brother Joe (who was 15) knew what he was doing, and had placed the left rear tire underneath the rim, so that when I caused the car to fall off the jack, the rear rim pinned my finger to the tire underneath.  Otherwise my finger would have been crushed between the rim and the concrete patio.
           
          As it was it was only badly bruised and painful, but no lasting damage.  Scared the devil out of me.
           
          Best Wishes to All,
           
          Jim Winkelmann
           


          --- On Sat, 8/1/09, C. Bibbee <quadgop2000@...> wrote:

          From: C. Bibbee <quadgop2000@...>
          Subject: Re: [Box-Art] "Mail Call"-B-52 Stratofortress
          To: Box-Art@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, August 1, 2009, 4:41 AM

           
          Christian;
           
           LOL. Catching "Gunny" in mistakes is one of my guilty pleasures. If you think he gets things wrong about aircraft, don't get me started on his bobbles on firearms history.
           
           "Lock-N'-Load" , his new show on small arms and artillery, promises to be very interesting from that standpoint.
           
           I taped that whole marathon yesterday (I'm "house-sitting" for a friend that's out of town, including making sure his favorite TV shows get recorded). Now I have another reason to anticipate watching it. Thanks! :-)
           
           Personal note about History Channel documentaries; the Revell-Monogram 1/48 B-29 model used in the HC doc "Stealing the Superfortress" (re the genesis of the Russian Tu-4 "Bull" bomber, their first A-bomb carrier) was built by Thomas Kipp, a multiple award-winning modeler who was a member of our local model club and a friend of mine.
           
           Sadly, we lost Tom last year in an accident at his home.  A bit of very serious advice; never, EVER work under a car up on ramps or (especially) jackstands without someone else around. Doing so resulted in Tom's death (due to jackstand collapse), and in 1965 a similar situation (with ramps) very nearly killed my father. Bad idea, trust me.
           
           (My definition of the proper way to do it? Take it to your local garage and let them do it, on their hydraulic lift.)
           
                                                                                                              Sincerely,
           
                                                                                                              Carl B.

          --- On Sat, 8/1/09, Christian Bryan <craviola880@ msn.com> wrote:

          From: Christian Bryan <craviola880@ msn.com>
          Subject: [Box-Art] "Mail Call"-B-52 Stratofortress
          To: Box-Art@yahoogroups .com
          Date: Saturday, August 1, 2009, 2:46 AM

           
          Just watched this re-run from 2005 for the first time last night. R Lee Ermey made no less than SEVENTEEN mistakes talking about the airplane throughout the hour!!! :-?

          "Frustration junction, what's that's function"??? Was pulling my hair out the whole time. Why History, or Discovery doesn't consult Carl Bibbee, or Matt Mattingley on these docus, is BEYOND me!! ;-)

          Needless to say, I didn't "Drop and give him 20".

          Criminy sakes...

          Christian


        • Ken Palmer
          I m very sorry to hear of the death of your friend Tom. But, I must have been extraordinarily lucky, as I did a LOT of work under several of my cars in
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 2, 2009
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            I'm very sorry to hear of the death of your friend Tom. But, I must have been extraordinarily lucky, as I did a LOT of work under several of my cars in 1978-92, using both heavy duty Sears car ramps and jackstands, rarely supplemented by a car jack, which probably would have been useless to prevent collapse if the ramps or jackstands had failed. How much good would a bystander have been, when the collapse of a car would almost immediately kill the person underneath?  I always used two jackstands, both very heavy duty and in perfect condition, and always firmly under a solid frame part, nothing thin, bendable, or weak.  I also had very heavy rubber chocks behind the rear wheels, never useless plastic ones.  The only time I was able to put a tire and rim under the car was when I was working on brakes, and so I wasn't under the car as I was for changing oil, starters, fuel pumps and oil and transmission pans.  So, what was I doing wrong?  I am way past physically able to do that again, but I would appreciate any commentary or advice to pass along to my sons.  Feel free to email me offline.

            Thanks,

            Ken

            --- On Sat, 8/1/09, viking010@... <viking010@...> wrote:

            From: viking010@... <viking010@...>
            Subject: Re: [Box-Art] "Mail Call"-B-52 Stratofortress
            To: Box-Art@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, August 1, 2009, 7:38 PM

             

             
             
             
            <<A bit of very serious advice; never, EVER work under a car up on ramps
                or (especially) jackstands without someone else around.>>
             
            I can second this as I almost lost a finger this way working on my orange Audi '74 LS when I was 16 back in the summer of 1984.  (Yes, I'm young, relatively.)
             
            We were changing the rear brake pads or shoes.  Fortunately my brother Joe (who was 15) knew what he was doing, and had placed the left rear tire underneath the rim, so that when I caused the car to fall off the jack, the rear rim pinned my finger to the tire underneath.  Otherwise my finger would have been crushed between the rim and the concrete patio.
             
            As it was it was only badly bruised and painful, but no lasting damage.  Scared the devil out of me.
             
            Best Wishes to All,
             
            Jim Winkelmann
             


            --- On Sat, 8/1/09, C. Bibbee <quadgop2000@ yahoo.com> wrote:

            From: C. Bibbee <quadgop2000@ yahoo.com>
            Subject: Re: [Box-Art] "Mail Call"-B-52 Stratofortress
            To: Box-Art@yahoogroups .com
            Date: Saturday, August 1, 2009, 4:41 AM

             
            Christian;
             
             LOL. Catching "Gunny" in mistakes is one of my guilty pleasures. If you think he gets things wrong about aircraft, don't get me started on his bobbles on firearms history.
             
             "Lock-N'-Load" , his new show on small arms and artillery, promises to be very interesting from that standpoint.
             
             I taped that whole marathon yesterday (I'm "house-sitting" for a friend that's out of town, including making sure his favorite TV shows get recorded). Now I have another reason to anticipate watching it. Thanks! :-)
             
             Personal note about History Channel documentaries; the Revell-Monogram 1/48 B-29 model used in the HC doc "Stealing the Superfortress" (re the genesis of the Russian Tu-4 "Bull" bomber, their first A-bomb carrier) was built by Thomas Kipp, a multiple award-winning modeler who was a member of our local model club and a friend of mine.
             
             Sadly, we lost Tom last year in an accident at his home.  A bit of very serious advice; never, EVER work under a car up on ramps or (especially) jackstands without someone else around. Doing so resulted in Tom's death (due to jackstand collapse), and in 1965 a similar situation (with ramps) very nearly killed my father. Bad idea, trust me.
             
             (My definition of the proper way to do it? Take it to your local garage and let them do it, on their hydraulic lift.)
             
                                                                                                                Sincerely,
             
                                                                                                                Carl B.

            --- On Sat, 8/1/09, Christian Bryan <craviola880@ msn.com> wrote:

            From: Christian Bryan <craviola880@ msn.com>
            Subject: [Box-Art] "Mail Call"-B-52 Stratofortress
            To: Box-Art@yahoogroups .com
            Date: Saturday, August 1, 2009, 2:46 AM

             
            Just watched this re-run from 2005 for the first time last night. R Lee Ermey made no less than SEVENTEEN mistakes talking about the airplane throughout the hour!!! :-?

            "Frustration junction, what's that's function"??? Was pulling my hair out the whole time. Why History, or Discovery doesn't consult Carl Bibbee, or Matt Mattingley on these docus, is BEYOND me!! ;-)

            Needless to say, I didn't "Drop and give him 20".

            Criminy sakes...

            Christian


          • C. Bibbee
            John P.:    Thanks. Now that you describe it, I remember that the mechanics at the garage where I used to have my old  67 Mustang (thirty-some years ago)
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 2, 2009
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              John P.:
               
               Thanks. Now that you describe it, I remember that the mechanics at the garage where I used to have my old '67 Mustang (thirty-some years ago) worked on used just that trick, even inside the shop, with two chunks of oak tree each about a foot and a half wide and about the same height, with big steel screw eyes to hold the ropes. They'd put one under each side of the axle on the rear end, or under the A-arms on the front end, when working on the floor. They said that they'd seen too many hydraulic jacks and ratchet-type jackstands suddenly decide to drop to take chances.
               
               By the time I'd moved on from the '67 to my '85 Camaro (about 1990), their definition of "ramps" was a rig that looked like the top half of a car-carrier that you drove the whole car up on to, where it sat level about four and a half feet off the floor. It also had built-in mount holes for wheel blocks with 1" steel pins holding them in position, and until the car was in position, the brakes locked, and the blocks in place, nobody got under it. And even then, walking behind the platform (on the side with the ramps) was a no-no.
               
               They used that platform for brake work, too. The chief mechanic preferred to do it as near eye level as possible, and if a jackstand tipped or dropped on that platform, the worst that could happen was getting your arm caught. I distinctly remember him reading one newbie the riot act for sticking his head under the front corner of a car (over the steel trackway) while that end of the car was on a jackstand during a brake relining. Denuded of the expletives, it boiled down to, "the whole point of this is to keep your head from getting mashed."
               
               The chief mechanic later told me that once, early in his career, he'd ended up with a broken arm due to a jackstand dropping a car on him while doing a brake job. He figured he was lucky it wasn't worse. After that, he operated on the "better safe than sorry" principle.
               
               
                                                                                                               Sincerely,
               
                                                                                                               Carl B.

              --- On Sat, 8/1/09, John P. Braungart <braungart@...> wrote:

              From: John P. Braungart <braungart@...>
              Subject: [Box-Art] Re: "Mail Call"-B-52 Stratofortress
              To: Box-Art@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Saturday, August 1, 2009, 10:29 AM

               
              --- In Box-Art@yahoogroups .com, "C. Bibbee" <quadgop2000@ ...> wrote:

              >  Sadly, we lost Tom last year in an accident at his home. A bit of
              > very serious advice; never, EVER work under a car up on ramps or
              > (especially) jackstands without someone else around. Doing so
              > resulted in Tom's death (due to jackstand collapse), and in 1965 a
              > similar situation (with ramps) very nearly killed my father. Bad
              > idea, trust me.
              >  (My definition of the proper way to do it? Take it to your local garage and let them do it, on their hydraulic lift.)
              >                                Sincerely,

              Carl - If you ~do~ insist on doing it, here's a 1930s tip from my dad. Back in the day, backyard mechanics would get an old stump, say 15" high and about 18" in diameter and screw of nail it to a piece of 3/4" plywood about 24"x24". Drill a hole in opposite corners and knot a rope through each of the holes.
              With the economy the way it is nowadays, a lot more guys are changing their own oil and plugs because of the cost.
              When you have to jack up the car (say to change the oil or whatever), toss one of the ropes under the car with enough force to come out the opposite end. Then pull the rope and drag the stump under the axle. Use the rope at the other end to "fine tune" the stump and later to pull the stump back out.
              NEVER go underneath the car until the stump is in place. I also know some guys who will also lower the car so that the stump is in contact with the axle. This will prevent the jack from slipping unless you accidentally kick it. Having the stump there also gives you room to go in on a creeper.
              Regards, -- John P.   

            • Christos G. Psarras
              ... Unfortunately, sometimes people will try to shave off 30 seconds a job and bypass spending that time to set up a what if backup plan... I ve worked for
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 2, 2009
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                ----- Original Message -----

                >
                > After that, he operated on the "better safe than sorry" principle.
                 
                Unfortunately, sometimes people will try to shave off 30 seconds a job and bypass spending that time to set up a "what if" backup plan...
                 
                 
                 
                I've worked for close to 10 years in steel plans and have seen first hand what lack of safety can do.  And I see that lack of safety-oriented thinking every single day on the road, the way some people will cut in front of you just to beat a few seconds on the clock.
                 
                At least I have managed to instill that "better safe than sorry" principle :)
                 
                Christos
                 
              • C. Bibbee
                Christos;    Thanks. That upper photo especially says it all.  
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 3, 2009
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                  Christos;
                   
                   Thanks. That upper photo especially says it all.
                   
                                                                                                                     Sincerely,
                   
                                                                                                                     Carl B.
                   
                   
                                                    

                  --- On Sun, 8/2/09, Christos G. Psarras <christos@...> wrote:

                  From: Christos G. Psarras <christos@...>
                  Subject: Re: [Box-Art] Re: "Mail Call"-B-52 Stratofortress
                  To: Box-Art@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 3:44 PM

                   

                   
                  ----- Original Message -----

                  >
                  > After that, he operated on the "better safe than sorry" principle.
                   
                  Unfortunately, sometimes people will try to shave off 30 seconds a job and bypass spending that time to set up a "what if" backup plan...
                   
                   
                   
                  I've worked for close to 10 years in steel plans and have seen first hand what lack of safety can do.  And I see that lack of safety-oriented thinking every single day on the road, the way some people will cut in front of you just to beat a few seconds on the clock.
                   
                  At least I have managed to instill that "better safe than sorry" principle :)
                   
                  Christos
                   
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