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Simple opinion question...

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  • apachelore2000
    I hope this doesn t strike as dumb! I understand the precision that may result from panning, but simple put, is panning necessary for all home recordings...900
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 1, 2008
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      I hope this doesn't strike as dumb! I understand the precision that
      may result from panning, but simple put, is panning necessary for all
      home recordings...900 user here.
    • thesongshop
      no rules- but it does give a certain sense of depth if done right
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 1, 2008
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        no rules-
        but it does give a certain sense of depth if done right



        --- In BossBr@yahoogroups.com, "apachelore2000" <apachelore2000@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I hope this doesn't strike as dumb! I understand the precision that
        > may result from panning, but simple put, is panning necessary for all
        > home recordings...900 user here.
        >
      • zoots@windstream.net
        Wish I knew how to do it right.
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 2, 2008
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          Wish I knew how to do it right.
          >
          > From: "thesongshop" <thesongshop@...>
          > Date: 2008/07/01 Tue PM 08:42:41 CDT
          > To: BossBr@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [BossBr] Re: Simple opinion question...
          >
          > no rules-
          > but it does give a certain sense of depth if done right
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In BossBr@yahoogroups.com, "apachelore2000" <apachelore2000@...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > I hope this doesn't strike as dumb! I understand the precision that
          > > may result from panning, but simple put, is panning necessary for all
          > > home recordings...900 user here.
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • fperfett
          ... I m still finding my way through home production, but there are plenty of online sites that can guide (or further confuse) you regarding mix and panning.
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 2, 2008
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            --- In BossBr@yahoogroups.com, <zoots@...> wrote:
            >
            > Wish I knew how to do it right.
            > >
            > > From: "thesongshop" <thesongshop@...>
            > > Date: 2008/07/01 Tue PM 08:42:41 CDT
            > > To: BossBr@yahoogroups.com
            > > Subject: [BossBr] Re: Simple opinion question...
            > >
            > > no rules-
            > > but it does give a certain sense of depth if done right

            I'm still finding my way through home production, but there are plenty
            of online sites that can guide (or further confuse) you regarding mix
            and panning. Some people swear by Hard Left - Center - Hard Right.
            Some like to spread the mix over a 180 degree stereo field, etc...

            I think a popular starting point is to have the bass drum, snare, bass
            guitar and vocals at center, and the toms spread tightly l-r and the
            cymbals further out on each side.
            Get a visual of a drum set facing you and recreate it in your stereo
            field.
            Guitars and keys can go anywhere as long as they don't pounce on
            anything else, and you could bring solos to near center or center if
            desired. You can also do a Jimmy Page and pan back and forth like in
            What Is and What Should Never be.
            Like the man before me said... no rules! There ain't no cop gonna give
            you a ticket for panning too far to the right side of the road. Trust
            your ears and tweak till you're content. Then read up on the subject
            and tweak some more, and so on...

            As far as I've read, it's more important that the various instruments
            don't muddle the mix by sitting on top of each other contending for
            the same sonic frequencies. For me, that's the tricky part.

            I'm sure there's enough talent on this board to give you (us) a quick
            primer in mix and panning to further our quest for the perfect mix.
          • Joseph Gerard
            Mr. Songshop and Mr. Perfett, I guess that s is what I was looking to accomplish, a wall of sound. I may not be correct wanting that even sound in all the
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 2, 2008
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              Mr. Songshop and Mr. Perfett,

              I guess that's is what I was looking to accomplish, a wall of sound. I may not be correct wanting that even sound in all the genres of songs I write, but I do for the time being. Thanks for the feedback.

              --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fperfett <hypercornster@...> wrote:

              From: fperfett <hypercornster@...>
              Subject: [BossBr] Re: Simple opinion question...
              To: BossBr@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 2:43 PM

              --- In BossBr@yahoogroups. com, <zoots@...> wrote:
              >
              > Wish I knew how to do it right.
              > >
              > > From: "thesongshop" <thesongshop@ ...>
              > > Date: 2008/07/01 Tue PM 08:42:41 CDT
              > > To: BossBr@yahoogroups. com
              > > Subject: [BossBr] Re: Simple opinion question...
              > >
              > > no rules-
              > > but it does give a certain sense of depth if done right

              I'm still finding my way through home production, but there are plenty
              of online sites that can guide (or further confuse) you regarding mix
              and panning. Some people swear by Hard Left - Center - Hard Right.
              Some like to spread the mix over a 180 degree stereo field, etc...

              I think a popular starting point is to have the bass drum, snare, bass
              guitar and vocals at center, and the toms spread tightly l-r and the
              cymbals further out on each side.
              Get a visual of a drum set facing you and recreate it in your stereo
              field.
              Guitars and keys can go anywhere as long as they don't pounce on
              anything else, and you could bring solos to near center or center if
              desired. You can also do a Jimmy Page and pan back and forth like in
              What Is and What Should Never be.
              Like the man before me said... no rules! There ain't no cop gonna give
              you a ticket for panning too far to the right side of the road. Trust
              your ears and tweak till you're content. Then read up on the subject
              and tweak some more, and so on...

              As far as I've read, it's more important that the various instruments
              don't muddle the mix by sitting on top of each other contending for
              the same sonic frequencies. For me, that's the tricky part.

              I'm sure there's enough talent on this board to give you (us) a quick
              primer in mix and panning to further our quest for the perfect mix.


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