Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Military School Protesters Freed

Expand Messages
  • SOA Watch /NE
    [For the addresses of those who remain incarcerated, updates about the SOA and the 13 activists who are awaiting prosecution for their participation in the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 14, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      [For the addresses of those who remain incarcerated, updates about the SOA
      and the 13 activists who are awaiting prosecution for their participation in
      the November 2001 protest on the military base as well as information about
      the upcoming rally and direct action in Washington DC (April 2002), visit
      www.soaw.org.]


      New York Times - January 14, 2002

      Military School Protesters Freed
      By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

      PEKIN, Ill. (AP) -- Seven women, including an 89-year-old nun, were released
      from federal custody Monday after serving six-month sentences for
      trespassing at a Georgia school that trains Latin American soldiers.

      The women were convicted last summer of trespassing during a protest at what
      was once known as the School of the Americas at Fort Benning, Ga.

      Among the seven were three Roman Catholic nuns: Sisters Dorothy Hennessey,
      89, Gwen Hennessey, 68, of Dubuque, Iowa, and Elizabeth Anne McKenzie, 72,
      of St. Paul, Minn.

      At a news conference at the Pekin Federal Prison Camp, McKenzie and others
      pledged to continue protesting at the school, now called the Western
      Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation, which they accuse of training
      soldiers who have been linked to murder, torture and other human rights
      abuses.

      ``It's just a matter of, `Here's a job to be done, with a risk,''' McKenzie
      said.

      Rebecca Kanner, 44, of Ann Arbor, Mich., said: ``Our effect has been felt,
      and we won't stop until the school is closed down.''

      Most of the women served their sentences at the Pekin prison camp. Dorothy
      Hennessey, Gwen Hennessey's sister, was released from a halfway house in
      Iowa, where she served her sentence because of health concerns.

      A total of 26 people were convicted of trespassing during the November 2000
      protest in which 3,400 people crossed onto the Army base without permission.
      Nineteen people remain in various federal prisons; two more women were
      scheduled to be released Tuesday and another will get out next month.

      Military officials have said the school's goal is to teach democratic
      principles to future Latin American leaders.
















































      _________________________________________________________________
      Send and receive Hotmail on your mobile device: http://mobile.msn.com
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.