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Summer 2012 National Immigrant Solidarity Network Monthly News Alert!

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    ____________________________________ (http://www.immigrantsolidarity.org/calendar/Calendar.php) Please post your immigrant action _calendar_
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 5, 2012
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      Please post your immigrant action calendar items

      Summer 2012 National Immigrant Solidarity Network Monthly News Digest and News Alert!

      National Immigrant Solidarity Network
      No Immigrant Bashing! Support Immigrant Rights!

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      Summer 2012 U.S. Immigrant Alert! Newsletter
      Published by National Immigrant Solidarity Network

      Please Our Newsletter: http://www.immigrantsolidarity.org/Newsletter/Summer12.pdf

      [Requires Adobe Acrobat, to download, go: http://www.adobe.com]

      Dream Come True: Obama Administration Announces Relief for DREAMers! BUT SB 1070 Continue, DREAM Still Long Ways to Go !

      In This Issue:

      1) Dream Come True !
      2) Relief for DREAMers
      3) Civil Rights Coalition’s Case Against SB 1070
      4) NY court upholds Lynn Steward's 10-year prison sentence
      5) USA Prison Industrial Complex Moves South
      6) The Rise of Asian Americans
      7) Vincent Chin
      8) Free Legal Clinics for Undocumented Youth
      9) Updates, Please Support NISN! Subscribe the Newsletter!

      Please download our latest newsletter: http://www.immigrantsolidarity.org/Newsletter/Summer12.pdf

      Dreams can Come True, Still Long Ways to Go !

      Border Angels

      The President just announced that he's going to stop deporting us DREAMers. We've heard promises like this before. Now, we need to make this promise real. Tell President Obama and the world that you will be watching to make sure to not one more DREAMer gets deported.

      Through the Right to Dream campaign, through actions in Obama campaign offices, through the cover of TIME magazine, we've demanded action from the President, and we've finally built enough power, in part through the growing Latino vote, to get it.

      It would be easy to stop here and celebrate the President's words, but we're 1.2 million deportations past words at this point. We have to send the country a message that while we appreciate the President's announcement today, we won't stop fighting for change until we see it.

      That's why I need you to tell the President, Congress and other leaders in this nation that you stand with me, and millions of undocumented people who have become Americans, even if we don't have papers that recognize us as such. If you tell them that you stand with us, you'll be sending a message, and that you'll continue to fight against every deportation. Tell them, now, and tell all your friends to do the same, Presente


      Arizona Immigration Law Ruling May Mean Boon For Private Prison Business

      Chris Kirkham - Huffington Post

      As the Supreme Court upheld a central provision of Arizona's controversial immigration law on Monday -– a requirement for law enforcement to check the legal status of suspected undocumented immigrants -- a powerful corporate lobby may stand to benefit: the private prison industry.

      For-profit prison companies including Corrections Corporation of America and the GEO Group Inc. have capitalized on the immigration crackdown over the past decade, now controlling nearly half of the nation's vast immigrant detention system. Both companies have more than doubled revenues from the business of detaining immigrants since 2005, collecting hundreds of millions of dollars in federal contracts with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

      Some immigration reform advocates and lawyers have argued that the upholding of the so-called "show me your papers" portion of Arizona's SB 1070 may bring more undocumented immigrants into the web of federal immigration enforcement, resulting in increased detentions and deportations.

      "This is really the pointy end of the sword of SB 1070," said Ali Noorani, executive director of the National Immigration Forum, an immigrants' rights group. "It provides a real boon, a real growth opportunity for the private prison industry in the State of Arizona."

      A Corrections Corporation of America spokesman said that "under longstanding policy, CCA does not and has not ever taken positions on or promoted any sentencing or detention legislation." A spokesman for the GEO Group did not respond to questions. In the past, CCA officials have stressed that the federal government, not local law enforcement, makes the ultimate decision on which undocumented immigrants should be detained.

      Federal officials attempted to assert their authority in Arizona on Monday by rescinding previous agreements with state law enforcement agencies to enforce immigration law at a local level. A senior administration official, who spoke to reporters on condition of anonymity, said Immigration and Customs Enforcement has formally told agents in Arizona to prioritize only the most serious violations referred by local law enforcement. Those include potential undocumented immigrants with a criminal history and repeat border crossers.

      "We will not allow a state to set our enforcement priorities," the senior administration official said.

      Yet legal observers argue that the federal government's talk of prioritizing certain immigrants is at odds with the recent drive of President Barack Obama's administration to appear tough on immigration enforcement. The administration has deported record numbers of undocumented immigrants, approaching nearly 400,000 each of the last two years, and critics have said the increased Arizona enforcement could bring more opportunities for detention and deportation.

      "The main issue here is that there continues to be a focus on deporting a lot of people," said Nancy Morawetz, a professor at the Immigrant Rights Clinic at New York University's School of Law. "There's a sort of pride in the number of people, and a pride in the number of people who happen to come in through an arrest, no matter what the arrest was."

      The potential of future litigation remains likely. Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer (R), who signed Arizona's immigration law in 2010, noted in a statement Monday: "Our critics are already preparing new litigation tactics in response to their loss at the Supreme Court, and undoubtedly will allege inequities in the implementation of the law."

      Corrections Corporation of America has strong ties in Arizona, operating three detention centers housing nearly 2,000 undocumented immigrants in the state. Dennis DeConcini, a former Democratic U.S. senator from Arizona, sits on CCA's board of directors. And several CCA lobbyists in Phoenix have worked for or consulted with Brewer.

      Critics have questioned CCA's ties to Arizona's law. As written, the law in part mirrors draft model legislation on immigration enforcement developed by the American Legislative Exchange Council, a group of conservative state legislators and business representatives tied to the drafting of Florida's controversial "Stand Your Ground" law.

      Until 2010, a CCA senior director, Laurie Shanblum, sat on the ALEC executive task force for public safety and elections, along with state Sen. Russell Pearce (R), who introduced SB 1070. Parts of the Arizona law, including the section upheld by the Supreme Court, are word-for-word the same as the ALEC public safety task force's model legislation, according to a review of documents posted online by the Center for Media and Democracy, a left-leaning advocacy group.

      Machak, the CCA spokesman, said that "any suggested connection between our company and Arizona's immigration law is baseless."

      Though model language developed by ALEC is similar to the language in SB 1070, others have taken credit for helping to draft the law, including Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who worked as an immigration advisor to U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft during the George W. Bush presidency. Kobach has advised other states and towns in developing immigration-related legislation, including Alabama.

      GEO Group executives in the past have not disputed that enforcement efforts like Arizona's immigration law may have positive impacts on their business. In a 2010 GEO Group earnings call after Brewer signed the Arizona law, an analyst asked executives whether the new legislation might affect business.

      Wayne Calabrese, then the company's chief operating officer, said the law "certainly indicates a level of frustration by the public," according to a transcript of the call. He added: "I can only believe that the opportunities at the federal level are going to continue apace as a result of what's happening. ... That to me at least suggests there's going to be enhanced opportunities for what we do."

      "Private prison companies are very explicit that they think the growth area for them is federal detention, and that means primarily immigration detention," said Emily Tucker, director of policy and advocacy for Detention Watch Network, an immigrants' rights group. "They're hoping this will mean more contracts for more detention beds.

      PEW Research: The Rise of Asian Americans

      [pewsocialtrends.org] Asian Americans are the highest-income, best-educated and fastest-growing racial group in the United States. They are more satisfied than the general public with their lives, finances and the direction of the country, and they place more value than other Americans do on marriage, parenthood, hard work and career success, according to a comprehensive new nationwide survey by the Pew Research Center.

      A century ago, most Asian Americans were low-skilled, low-wage laborers crowded into ethnic enclaves and targets of official discrimination. Today they are the most likely of any major racial or ethnic group in America to live in mixed neighborhoods and to marry across racial lines. When newly minted medical school graduate Priscilla Chan married Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg last month, she joined the 37% of all recent Asian-American brides who wed a non-Asian groom.1

      These milestones of economic success and social assimilation have come to a group that is still majority immigrant. Nearly three-quarters (74%) of Asian-American adults were born abroad; of these, about half say they speak English very well and half say they don’t.

      Asians recently passed Hispanics as the largest group of new immigrants to the United States. The educational credentials of these recent arrivals are striking. More than six-in-ten (61%) adults ages 25 to 64 who have come from Asia in recent years have at least a bachelor’s degree. This is double the share among recent non-Asian arrivals, and almost surely makes the recent Asian arrivals the most highly educated cohort of immigrants in U.S. history.

      Compared with the educational attainment of the population in their country of origin, recent Asian immigrants also stand out as a select group. For example, about 27% of adults ages 25 to 64 in South Korea and 25% in Japan have a bachelor’s degree or more.2 In contrast, nearly 70% of comparably aged recent immigrants from these two countries have at least a bachelor’s degree.

      Recent Asian immigrants are also about three times as likely as recent immigrants from other parts of the world to receive their green cards—or permanent resident status—on the basis of employer rather than family sponsorship (though family reunification remains the most common legal gateway to the U.S. for Asian immigrants, as it is for all immigrants).

      The modern immigration wave from Asia is nearly a half century old and has pushed the total population of Asian Americans—foreign born and U.S born, adults and children—to a record 18.2 million in 2011, or 5.8% of the total U.S. population, up from less than 1% in 1965.3 By comparison, non-Hispanic whites are 197.5 million and 63.3%, Hispanics 52.0 million and 16.7% and non-Hispanic blacks 38.3 million and 12.3%.

      Asian Americans trace their roots to any of dozens of countries in the Far East, Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent. Each country of origin subgroup has its own unique history, culture, language, religious beliefs, economic and demographic traits, social and political values, and pathways into America.

      But despite often sizable subgroup differences, Asian Americans are distinctive as a whole, especially when compared with all U.S. adults, whom they exceed not just in the share with a college degree (49% vs. 28%), but also in median annual household income ($66,000 versus $49,800) and median household wealth ($83,500 vs. $68,529).4

      They are noteworthy in other ways, too. According to the Pew Research Center survey of a nationally representative sample of 3,511 Asian Americans, conducted by telephone from Jan. 3 to March 27, 2012, in English and seven Asian languages, they are more satisfied than the general public with their lives overall (82% vs. 75%), their personal finances (51% vs. 35%) and the general direction of the country (43% vs. 21%).

      They also stand out for their strong emphasis on family. More than half (54%) say that having a successful marriage is one of the most important things in life; just 34% of all American adults agree. Two-thirds of Asian-American adults (67%) say that being a good parent is one of the most important things in life; just 50% of all adults agree.

      Their living arrangements align with these values. They are more likely than all American adults to be married (59% vs. 51%); their newborns are less likely than all U.S. newborns to have an unmarried mother (16% vs. 41%); and their children are more likely than all U.S. children to be raised in a household with two married parents (80% vs. 63%).

      They are more likely than the general public to live in multi-generational family households. Some 28% live with at least two adult generations under the same roof, twice the share of whites and slightly more than the share of blacks and Hispanics who live in such households. U.S. Asians also have a strong sense of filial respect; about two-thirds say parents should have a lot or some influence in choosing one’s profession (66%) and spouse (61%).

      Read More: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/06/19/the-rise-of-asian-americans/

      Please download our latest newsletter: http://www.immigrantsolidarity.org/Newsletter/Summer12.pdf

      Useful Immigrant Resources on Detention and Deportation

      Face Sheet: Immigration Detention--Questions and Answers (Dec, 2008) by: http://www.thepoliticsofimmigration.org

      Thanks for GREAT works from Detention Watch Network (DWN) to compiled the following information, please visit DWN website: http://www.detentionwatchnetwork.org

      Tracking ICE's Enforcement Agenda
      Real Deal fact sheet on detention
      Real Deal fact sheet on border

      - From Raids to Deportation-A Community Resource Kit
      - Know Your Rights in the Community (English, Spanish)
      - Know Your Rights in Detention
      - Pre-Raid Community Safety Plan
      - Raids to Deportation Map
      - Raids to Deportation Policy Map

      More on Immigration Resource Page

      Useful Handouts and Know Your Immigrant Rights When Marches
      Immigrant Marches / Marchas de los Inmigrantes
      (By ACLU)

      Immigrants and their supporters are participating in marches all over the country to protest proposed national legislation and to seek justice for immigrants. The materials available here provide important information about the rights and risks involved for anyone who is planning to participate in the ongoing marches.

      If government agents question you, it is important to understand your rights. You should be careful in the way you speak when approached by the police, FBI, or INS. If you give answers, they can be used against you in a criminal, immigration, or civil case.

      The ACLU's publications below provide effective and useful guidance in several languages for many situations. The brochures apprise you of your legal rights, recommend how to preserve those rights, and provide guidance on how to interact with officials.

      Know Your Rights When Encountering Law Enforcement
      | Conozca Sus Derechos Frente A Los Agentes Del Orden Público

      ACLU of Massachusetts - Your Rights And Responsibilities If You Are Contacted By The Authorities English | Spanish | Chinese

      ACLU of Massachusetts - What to do if stopped and questioned about your immigration status on the street, the subway, or the bus
      | Que hacer si Usted es interrogado en el tren o autobus acerca de su estatus inmigratorio

      ACLU of South Carolina - How To Deal With A 287(g)
      | Como Lidiar Con Una 287(g)

      ACLU of Southern California - What to Do If Immigration Agents or Police Stop You While on Foot, in Your Car, or Come to Your Home
      | Qué Hacer Si Agentes de Inmigración o la Policía lo Paran Mientras Va Caminando, lo Detienen en su Auto o Vienen a su Hogar

      ACLU of Washington - Brochure for Iraqis: What to Do If the FBI or Police Contact You for Questioning English | Arabic

      ACLU of Washington - Your Rights at Checkpoints at Ferry Terminals
      | Sus Derechos en Puestos de Control en las Terminales de Transbordadores

      Immigrant Protests - What Every Worker Should Know:
      | Manifestaciones de los Inmigrantes - Lo Que Todo Trabajador Debe Saber

      ACLU of Florida Brochure - The Rights of Protesters
      | Los Derechos de los Manifestantes

      Washington State - Student Walkouts and Political Speech at School
      | Huelgas Estudiantiles y Expresión Política en las Escuelas

      California Students: Public School Walk-outs and Free Speech
      | Estudiantes de California: Marchas o Huelgas y La Libertad de Expresión en las Escuelas Públicas

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