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coalition of immokalee workers (CIW) available to speak in so cal oct 13-20

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  • theokat@aol.com
    pls pass along to all interested parties, and contact bryan payne at sfw_alliance@hotmail.com for further information. “THE EVERYDAY FACE OF GLOBALIZATION:
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 5, 2003
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      pls pass along to all interested parties, and contact bryan payne at
      sfw_alliance@... for further information.

      “THE EVERYDAY FACE OF GLOBALIZATION: Farmworker Poverty, Fast Food Profits,
      and You!”

      The terms "sweatshop" and "slavery" are laden with images of foreign lands
      and centuries past. Rarely do we associate such terms with life in the
      United States in the 21st century. Yet, for the workers who toil in the
      fields of the US day after day to put food on our plates, sweatshops and
      slavery are a reality.

      Farmworkers are among the poorest, most vulnerable and exploited class of
      laborers in the country: no right to organize without fear of retaliation,
      no right to overtime pay, sub-poverty wages, no access to benefits, and in
      the most extreme cases, modern-day slavery, as seen in the five cases of
      slavery in the fields of Florida that have been brought to justice in the
      past five years. This reality stems from a combination of the historic
      imbalance of power in agricultural labor relations and a fundamental shift
      in the global economic system that has taken place over the past few
      decades.

      The Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW), a community-based farmworker
      organization in Southwest Florida, is challenging this paradigm by making
      the links between the exploitation of farmworkers and the profits of the
      fast food industry, the fastest growing consumer of the fruits and
      vegetables harvested in the fields of the US.

      The struggle of these farmworkers, and that of so many others has gained more
      public attention due to their recent hunger strikes against fast food giant
      Taco Bell, Truth Tours across the country to the Taco Bell headquarters in
      Irvine, CA, protests, collaboration with students, activists, unions, and leaders
      in the faith community, and tireless dedication to justice and human rights
      for workers.

      These public presentations led by members of the CIW will explore the
      relationship between farmworker poverty, fast food profits and young consumers, the
      target audience of the fast food industry. The speakers will engage the
      audience in critical thinking about these issues through interactive theater and
      other creative activities.

      The work of the CIW to end sweatshops and slavery in the fields has been
      widely recognized over the past year, from feature articles in the New
      Yorker (April 21-28, 2003) and National Geographic (September 2003) to the
      recent Miami Herald series "Fields of Desperation" (Sept. 1-4, 2003).

      CIW speakers available for the tour include young, immigrant
      farmworker leaders:

      * Lucas Benitez, a 27-year old farmworker from Guerrero, Mexico, winner of
      various national awards, including the 1999 Brick Award for "America's Best
      Young Community Leader", by Rolling Stone Magazine and the Do Something
      Foundation.

      * Francisca Cortez, a 21-year old farmworker from Oaxaca, Mexico, featured
      in the Center for Economic and Social Rights "Human Rights in the USA 2002
      Calendar"

      fmi please contact bryan payne at sfw_alliance@....


      ¡ya basta!
      kathryn s. reuter
      323 640 6598

      i am not a libertador, libertadores do not exist. the people liberate
      themselves. --che guevara

      [r]esistance against neoliberalism does not only exist in the mountains of
      the mexican southeast. in other parts of mexico, in latin america, in the u.s.
      and canada, in europe of the treaty of maastricht, in africa, in asia, in
      oceania, pockets of resistance multiply. each one of them has its own history, its
      own differences, equalities, demands, struggles, and accomplishments. if
      humanity still has a hope of survival, of improvement, that hope is in the pockets
      filled with the excluded ones, the leftovers, the ones who are disposable. . .
      . there are as many shapes as there are resistances, and as many worlds as
      there are in the world. so draw the shape you prefer. --subcomandante marcos,
      'seven loose pieces of the global jigsaw puzzle,' mexico, 1997 june


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