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Re: Max Hoeben and Ann Frank

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  • greyford475
    Hi: You have never heard of Max Hoeben? Aren t you at all interested in the history of your own sport? By the way the places were Jews lived were called
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 21, 2013
      Hi: You have never heard of Max Hoeben? Aren't you at all interested in the history of your own sport? By the way the places were Jews lived were called "ghettos" not slums. I'm sure you are a fine man, but you need to learn some history.
      Best Wishes,
      Tom Risher

      --- In Boomerang_Talk@yahoogroups.com, Dana Larrabee <dana@...> wrote:
      >
      > There were about 75,000 - 80-000 jews in Amsterdam at the start of WW2, and approximately 750,000 inhabitants overall. Of course the Jewish community often resided mainly in the same area of a city ( generally known at the time as slums unfortunately but some of the richest people in Europe at the time were Jewish; i.e. the Rothchilds for example). 
      >
      > Anne Frank's family moved to Amsterdam in 1933, when she would have been about 4. The window of opportunity of them ever knowing each other would have been about 9 years.
      >
      > The probability of them knowing each other considering the circumstances was quite small I would think but if there is real evidence of it either through family histories or other data then fine. I'm not trying to disparage the man. I've never even heard of him. Just saying it would seem to be unlikely. 
      >
      >  
      > Dana Larrabee
      >
      >
      > Boomerangs.com
      > 4095 Oceanside Blvd.
      > Suite E
      > Oceanside, CA 92056
      >
      >
      > 888-734-1166 TEL
      > 760-722-3561 FAX
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: greyford475 <greyford475@...>
      > To: Boomerang_Talk@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2013 4:37 PM
      > Subject: [Boomerang_Talk] Max Hoeben and Ann Frank
      >
      >
      >
      >  
      > Hello Talkers:
      > I have done some research on Max Hoeben and Ann Frank. I wasn't able to find Max's exact birthday but I believe he was born in 1925. Ann Frank was born in 1929. They both lived their childhood in Amsterdam, Netherlands. It's perfectly reasonable that they would have known each other as children. The Frank family were Jews who moved to the Netherlands to escape the Nazis. In 1942 the Frank family went into hiding. They hid in a large building that had some hidden rooms called the annex. The building is where Otto Frank, Ann's father, had a food processing company. It was here that Ann wrote her famous diary from 1942 to 1944. In 1944 the family was discovered by the Nazis who took the family to a concentration camp. In April 1945, Margot, Ann's older sister died of typhus. Two days later Ann also died of typhus. The camp was liberated by the Allies two weeks later.
      > Max Hoeben's fate was a little better. During the war he was taken by the Nazis to Germany to work in a slave labor camp. He escaped but was recaptured and was sent back to the camp. He escaped a second time and made it back to the Netherlands where he hide out until the end of the war.
      > After the war, Max did a series of odd jobs. One of these jobs took him to Australia where he discovered the boomerang and embraced the sport completely. In the late 1970s he went back to Holland and introduced the Dutch public to the boomerang sport. He set up the first Holland boomerang club. He also experimented with many different boomerang shapes including the E-rang and large oversize boomerangs. The following is my opinion, but I believe that Max embraced the boomerang because of its whimsical nature and because it gave him some relief from the grim reality of his youth. Working in a slave labor camp is not something that would engender one to believe in the goodness of humanity. Yet the boomerang brought him back. Ted Bailey said that Max visited him in the summer of 1997 and spent his spare time walking all over Ann Arbor making friends. When he went back to Holland everyone missed him.
      > Max Hoeben also had a career as a novel writer. On a European book dealer's web site I found one title my Max Hoeben. The name of the book was: "Inspecteur Brave en het Boemerang Mysterie."
      > Which in English I believe is: "Inspector Brave and the Boomerang Mystery." I wish I could read it, but it's in Dutch. As far as I can tell none of his novels have been translated into English. But to the Dutch public he was well known as a novelist. Max Hoeben died on Dec. 5, 2001.
      > Best Wishes
      > Tom Risher
      >
    • Dana Larrabee
      I truly am interested in the history of the sport. Not the myths. If you think it likely that he knew Anne Frank, 1 partially cloistered child out of a 75,000
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 22, 2013
        I truly am interested in the history of the sport. Not the myths. If you think it likely that he knew Anne Frank, 1 partially cloistered child out of a 75,000 subset of 750,000 people, perhaps you need to learn more about math.

        I mean no harm. I simply want history to be accurate, not heresay. If there is evidence of the happenstance great. And by the way, I easily tested out of 4 college courses in history as a high school student as well as a statistics course. I care about historical accuracy. That's all. I do not know the man. I hope you are correct. I have no data beyond the math to indicate that he didn't know Anne Frank. It is certainly possible that he did.

        The term slum was also used by the way. Example:

        http://www.aish.com/ho/o/48959726.html

        A quote from the article:

        "The most famous was the Warsaw Ghetto. Thus was the fate of 335,000 Jews in Warsaw – representing one-third of the city’s total population.
        Additional Jews were herded into Warsaw, so the Jewish population rose to about 450,000. They were all thrown into a slum that comprised 2.3% of the city area, and walled off"
         
        Dana Larrabee

        Boomerangs.com
        4095 Oceanside Blvd.
        Suite E
        Oceanside, CA 92056


        888-734-1166 TEL
        760-722-3561 FAX

        From: greyford475 <greyford475@...>
        To: Boomerang_Talk@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2013 11:26 PM
        Subject: [Boomerang_Talk] Re: Max Hoeben and Ann Frank

         
        Hi: You have never heard of Max Hoeben? Aren't you at all interested in the history of your own sport? By the way the places were Jews lived were called "ghettos" not slums. I'm sure you are a fine man, but you need to learn some history.
        Best Wishes,
        Tom Risher

        --- In Boomerang_Talk@yahoogroups.com, Dana Larrabee <dana@...> wrote:
        >
        > There were about 75,000 - 80-000 jews in Amsterdam at the start of WW2, and approximately 750,000 inhabitants overall. Of course the Jewish community often resided mainly in the same area of a city ( generally known at the time as slums unfortunately but some of the richest people in Europe at the time were Jewish; i.e. the Rothchilds for example). 
        >
        > Anne Frank's family moved to Amsterdam in 1933, when she would have been about 4. The window of opportunity of them ever knowing each other would have been about 9 years.
        >
        > The probability of them knowing each other considering the circumstances was quite small I would think but if there is real evidence of it either through family histories or other data then fine. I'm not trying to disparage the man. I've never even heard of him. Just saying it would seem to be unlikely. 
        >
        >  
        > Dana Larrabee
        >
        >
        > Boomerangs.com
        > 4095 Oceanside Blvd.
        > Suite E
        > Oceanside, CA 92056
        >
        >
        > 888-734-1166 TEL
        > 760-722-3561 FAX
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: greyford475 <greyford475@...>
        > To: Boomerang_Talk@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2013 4:37 PM
        > Subject: [Boomerang_Talk] Max Hoeben and Ann Frank
        >
        >
        >
        >  
        > Hello Talkers:
        > I have done some research on Max Hoeben and Ann Frank. I wasn't able to find Max's exact birthday but I believe he was born in 1925. Ann Frank was born in 1929. They both lived their childhood in Amsterdam, Netherlands. It's perfectly reasonable that they would have known each other as children. The Frank family were Jews who moved to the Netherlands to escape the Nazis. In 1942 the Frank family went into hiding. They hid in a large building that had some hidden rooms called the annex. The building is where Otto Frank, Ann's father, had a food processing company. It was here that Ann wrote her famous diary from 1942 to 1944. In 1944 the family was discovered by the Nazis who took the family to a concentration camp. In April 1945, Margot, Ann's older sister died of typhus. Two days later Ann also died of typhus. The camp was liberated by the Allies two weeks later.
        > Max Hoeben's fate was a little better. During the war he was taken by the Nazis to Germany to work in a slave labor camp. He escaped but was recaptured and was sent back to the camp. He escaped a second time and made it back to the Netherlands where he hide out until the end of the war.
        > After the war, Max did a series of odd jobs. One of these jobs took him to Australia where he discovered the boomerang and embraced the sport completely. In the late 1970s he went back to Holland and introduced the Dutch public to the boomerang sport. He set up the first Holland boomerang club. He also experimented with many different boomerang shapes including the E-rang and large oversize boomerangs. The following is my opinion, but I believe that Max embraced the boomerang because of its whimsical nature and because it gave him some relief from the grim reality of his youth. Working in a slave labor camp is not something that would engender one to believe in the goodness of humanity. Yet the boomerang brought him back. Ted Bailey said that Max visited him in the summer of 1997 and spent his spare time walking all over Ann Arbor making friends. When he went back to Holland everyone missed him.
        > Max Hoeben also had a career as a novel writer. On a European book dealer's web site I found one title my Max Hoeben. The name of the book was: "Inspecteur Brave en het Boemerang Mysterie."
        > Which in English I believe is: "Inspector Brave and the Boomerang Mystery." I wish I could read it, but it's in Dutch. As far as I can tell none of his novels have been translated into English. But to the Dutch public he was well known as a novelist. Max Hoeben died on Dec. 5, 2001.
        > Best Wishes
        > Tom Risher
        >



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