Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [BookCrossing] Re: Bookcrossing opinion piece

Expand Messages
  • KaeLee Newton
    From: jesse75101 By releasing a bunch of Grisham novels, is it doing the world any favors in terms of getting people to read more intelligent literature? Is
    Message 1 of 111 , May 1, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      From: jesse75101
      By releasing a bunch of Grisham novels, is it doing the world any favors in terms of getting people to read more intelligent literature? Is the point just to get someone to pick up and journal the book? Or is the point to get more people reading and talking about things that make them think?
      I went and read the article too. I just skimmed it because frankly, the writing didn't grab me, so I won't comment on the article itself. I will say this though, I don't release to do the world a favor. I release to do someone a favor. I release books because I want someone to find them and read them. I don't care if it is the worst crap I've read (though honestly I don't release books I think are crap -- I'll donate those) or a literary classic. I'm not releasing a book to set the world on fire.

      My hope is that somebody finds my book and it gets them reading, or reading more, or again. That they find the book and rediscover a world they forgot. Sure, having someone find a book that changes their life and having it come from me would be super cool. I picked up a few copies of Wally Lamb's She's Come Undone at the Saint Louis Book Fair this weekend for just that reason. But I don't think every book is going to do that. Nor is every book capable of doing that. I just want my books to find a nice home and maybe, if they're lucky and so am I, to help someone pick up another book once that one is finished.

      KaeLee
      BCSN: Soraidh
      StL, MO

      The karma of literature: http://www.bookcrossing.com/friend/soraidh
      --
      My Nanny always used to say, "If you put your problems into a basket with everyone else's, you'd take yours back out again."

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • agneswross
      I ve found this whole thread very interesting, so even though I normally lurk, I thought I d pop in with my - or rather my husband s - story: As most folks do,
      Message 111 of 111 , May 8, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        I've found this whole thread very interesting, so even though I
        normally lurk, I thought I'd pop in with my - or rather my
        husband's - story: As most folks do, he has a running list of
        expressions he uses that his father and others he grew up with used
        all of their lives, with no context. For example, a rainy, windy,
        gray, cold, all around nasty day was called "a good day for a
        hanging."
        We always thought atmosphere, hangings are unpleasant, nasty
        weather - that sort of thing.
        One day, on such a cold and rainy, ugly day, he walked into work,
        soaking wet, raincoat dripping, and said "Whew! Good day for a
        hanging!"
        Apparently one of his black coworkers was utterly horrified, went at
        once and reported what Husband had said to the supervisor, who
        proceeded to call my utterly perplexed husband to his office to tell
        him in no uncertain terms that he shouldn't use racist slurs.
        Huh? WHAT racist slurs? After he realized that DH had absolutely no
        idea what he was talking about, the boss went on to explain to my
        (PhD chemist, hyper intelligent) husband about the history of
        lynchings and the connotation to black people. He KNEW all of that,
        his hanging expression just had nothing to do with it.
        We still shake our heads at that one, because he never had any idea
        of insulting anyone.
        Sometimes, it's all in how you take it...

        AbbyR


        --- In BookCrossing@yahoogroups.com, "ecrust2001" <erust@c...> wrote:
        > FWIW, when I first heard the Keith/Nelson duet "Beer for My
        Horses,"
        > I found that rather nostalgic verse about lynch mobs quite
        disturbing
        > enough without considering its potentially racist implications. [I
        > don't know what percentage of Old West lynching victims were non-
        > white, but I do know that horse thieves would be lynched
        regardless
        > of race, color, or creed - not that being an equal-opportunity
        lynch
        > mob is an improvement.]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.