Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Naval history

Expand Messages
  • Peter Parady
    I think the lists would enjoy this.true or not. http://www.crainium.net/jdjArchives/2010/02/naval_trivia.html I have no idea whether this is true. I suspect
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 19, 2010
    • 0 Attachment

       

      I think the lists would enjoy this…true or not.

       

      http://www.crainium.net/jdjArchives/2010/02/naval_trivia.html

      I have no idea whether this is true. I suspect it's not. But it makes a good story.

      The U.S.S. Constitution -- Old Ironsides -- carried 48,600 gallons of fresh water for her crew of 475 officers and men. This was sufficient to last six months of sustained operations at sea. She carried no evaporators (i.e., fresh water distillers).

      Let it be noted that according to her ship's log, the U.S.S. Constitution sailed from Boston on July 27th, 1798 with a full complement of 475 officers and men, 48,600 gallons of fresh water, 7,400 cannon shot, 11,600 pounds of black powder and 79,400 gallons of rum.

      Her mission: To destroy and harass English shipping.

      Making Jamaica on October 6th, she took on 826 pounds of flour and 68,300 gallons of rum.

      Then she headed for the Azores, arriving there November 12th. She was provisioned with 550 pounds of beef and 64,300 gallons of Portuguese wine.

      On November 18th, she set sail for England. In the ensuing days she defeated five British men-of-war and captured and scuttled 12 English merchant ships, salvaging only the rum aboard each.

      By January 26th, her powder and shot were exhausted. Nevertheless, although unarmed, she made a night raid up the Firth of Clyde in Scotland. Her landing party captured a whiskey distillery and transferred 40,000 gallons of single malt Scotch aboard by dawn. Then she headed home.

      The U.S.S. Constitution arrived in Boston on February 20th, 1799, with no cannon shot, no food, no powder, no rum, no wine, no whiskey, and 38,600 gallons of water.

      Regards,

       

       

      PBP

       

      Si hoc legere scis numium eruditionis habes

      pbp_E

       

    • David Bennett
      Those must have been Very Thirsty sailors :O) ... Dave Bennett, VE7YJ Aldergrove, BC Be who you are, say what you feel, because those who mind don t matter
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 19, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Those must have been Very Thirsty sailors :O)

        On Fri, Feb 19, 2010 at 10:07 AM, Peter Parady <peter.parady@...> wrote:
         

         


        The U.S.S. Constitution arrived in Boston on February 20th, 1799, with no cannon shot, no food, no powder, no rum, no wine, no whiskey, and 38,600 gallons of water.


        --
        Dave Bennett, VE7YJ
        Aldergrove, BC

        "Be who you are, say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
        -- Theodor Geisel, "Dr. Seuss"
      • dragon1137@comcast.net
        I ve never been so proud to be a Yank. ... From: Peter Parady To: Hornblower-L@yahoogroups.com, Bolitho@yahoogroups.com Sent:
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 19, 2010
        • 0 Attachment

          I've never been so proud to be a Yank.

           


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Peter Parady" <peter.parady@...>
          To: Hornblower-L@yahoogroups.com, Bolitho@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, February 19, 2010 10:07:58 AM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
          Subject: [Bolitho] Naval history

           

           

          I think the lists would enjoy this…true or not.

           

          http://www.crainium.net/jdjArchives/2010/02/naval_trivia.html

          I have no idea whether this is true. I suspect it's not. But it makes a good story.

          The U.S.S. Constitution -- Old Ironsides -- carried 48,600 gallons of fresh water for her crew of 475 officers and men. This was sufficient to last six months of sustained operations at sea. She carried no evaporators (i.e., fresh water distillers).

          Let it be noted that according to her ship's log, the U.S.S. Constitution sailed from Boston on July 27th, 1798 with a full complement of 475 officers and men, 48,600 gallons of fresh water, 7,400 cannon shot, 11,600 pounds of black powder and 79,400 gallons of rum.

          Her mission: To destroy and harass English shipping.

          Making Jamaica on October 6th, she took on 826 pounds of flour and 68,300 gallons of rum.

          Then she headed for the Azores, arriving there November 12th. She was provisioned with 550 pounds of beef and 64,300 gallons of Portuguese wine.

          On November 18th, she set sail for England. In the ensuing days she defeated five British men-of-war and captured and scuttled 12 English merchant ships, salvaging only the rum aboard each.

          By January 26th, her powder and shot were exhausted. Nevertheless, although unarmed, she made a night raid up the Firth of Clyde in Scotland. Her landing party captured a whiskey distillery and transferred 40,000 gallons of single malt Scotch aboard by dawn. Then she headed home.

          The U.S.S. Constitution arrived in Boston on February 20th, 1799, with no cannon shot, no food, no powder, no rum, no wine, no whiskey, and 38,600 gallons of water.

          Regards,

           

           

          PBP

           

          Si hoc legere scis numium eruditionis habes

          pbp_E

           

        • jim davis
          Amusing...I read a book on food, dont remember the name , and they recounted the amount of beer, wine and spirits consumed in Colonial times....Must have been
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 19, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Amusing...I read a book on food, dont remember the name , and they recounted the amount of beer, wine and spirits consumed in Colonial times....Must have been Happy people.
            Jim D

            --- On Fri, 2/19/10, Peter Parady <peter.parady@...> wrote:

            From: Peter Parady <peter.parady@...>
            Subject: [Bolitho] Naval history
            To: Hornblower-L@yahoogroups.com, Bolitho@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Friday, February 19, 2010, 12:07 PM

             

             

            I think the lists would enjoy this…true or not.

             

            http://www.crainium .net/jdjArchives /2010/02/ naval_trivia. html

            I have no idea whether this is true. I suspect it's not. But it makes a good story.

            The U.S.S. Constitution -- Old Ironsides -- carried 48,600 gallons of fresh water for her crew of 475 officers and men. This was sufficient to last six months of sustained operations at sea. She carried no evaporators (i.e., fresh water distillers).

            Let it be noted that according to her ship's log, the U.S.S. Constitution sailed from Boston on July 27th, 1798 with a full complement of 475 officers and men, 48,600 gallons of fresh water, 7,400 cannon shot, 11,600 pounds of black powder and 79,400 gallons of rum.

            Her mission: To destroy and harass English shipping.

            Making Jamaica on October 6th, she took on 826 pounds of flour and 68,300 gallons of rum.

            Then she headed for the Azores, arriving there November 12th. She was provisioned with 550 pounds of beef and 64,300 gallons of Portuguese wine.

            On November 18th, she set sail for England. In the ensuing days she defeated five British men-of-war and captured and scuttled 12 English merchant ships, salvaging only the rum aboard each.

            By January 26th, her powder and shot were exhausted. Nevertheless, although unarmed, she made a night raid up the Firth of Clyde in Scotland. Her landing party captured a whiskey distillery and transferred 40,000 gallons of single malt Scotch aboard by dawn. Then she headed home.

            The U.S.S. Constitution arrived in Boston on February 20th, 1799, with no cannon shot, no food, no powder, no rum, no wine, no whiskey, and 38,600 gallons of water.

            Regards,

             

             

            PBP

             

            Si hoc legere scis numium eruditionis habes

            pbp_E

             


          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.