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sailing terms -- full and bye

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  • timoneer2001
    ... the ... Bye ... of ... Office; ... period. ... are ... There is a wealth of information available on the Internet. Just do a google search for whatever
    Message 1 of 25 , Nov 1, 2004
      --- In Bolitho@yahoogroups.com, "timoneer2001" <timoneer2001@y...>
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In Bolitho@yahoogroups.com, "TIME Training" <phil.waters@n...>
      > wrote:
      >
      > > If I might be so bold as to make a couple of suggestions....All
      the
      > Bolitho
      > > books contain lots of old nautical expressions like 'Full and
      Bye'
      > What do
      > > they mean? Could we open forum to enable people to put words or
      > phrases from
      > > the books ,the origin and meaning they are not sure about and seek
      > > explanations.
      >
      > > Phil Waters
      >
      >
      > Phil, There are numerous books and even some resources on the web,
      > but I would like to recommend "A Sea of Words" by Dean King. It is
      > subtitled "A Lexicon and Companion to the Complete Seafaring Tales
      of
      > Patrick O'Brian." It is more than a dictionary. Included are
      > topics such as: King, Cabinet, and Parliament; the Admiralty
      Office;
      > Ships and tactics; Daily Life on a Warship; Maps; Types of Sailing
      > Ships, Overviews of the French Wars; and medicine during the
      period.
      > There are even mini-biographies of major figures of the period. I
      > have found it helpful when reading any of the authors whose books
      are
      > set in this era. Good reading, Don

      There is a wealth of information available on the Internet. Just do
      a google search for whatever term you need or search for "sailing
      terms" or "natical terms" etc. One such site, that contains the
      answer to your query is: http://members.shaw.ca/diesel-
      duck/library/other/classic.htm

      "Full and bye" is, at this website, defined as sailing almost close-
      hauled, with all sails filled and pulling strongly.

      My understanding of this is that the ship is sailing as closedly as
      possible into the wind (sailing bye) but then eased off of the wind
      enough to cause the sails to completely fill (sailing full).
      Don
    • Mil Goose
      ... web, ........ and one I would recommend, and which Susan pointed me in the direction of some time ago, is Seamanship in the Age of Sail by John Harland,
      Message 2 of 25 , Nov 1, 2004
        > --- In Bolitho@yahoogroups.com, "timoneer2001" <timoneer2001@y...>
        > > > Phil, There are numerous books and even some resources on the
        web,


        ........ and one I would recommend, and which Susan pointed me in the
        direction of some time ago, is "Seamanship in the Age of Sail" by
        John Harland, and to this excellent website.

        If it was a good enough point of reference for the men of the
        time, then I'm sure it can be for us latterday sailors (in my case,
        an armchair one), is "William Falconer's Dictionary of the Marine".

        http://southseas.nla.gov.au/refs/falc/0592.html

        The link above refers to "full and bye"


        - Cookie -
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