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Daily Breeze: County requires dogs be microchip implanted

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  • Brent Morgan
    It will be required by law to have your dog microchipped if you live in unincorporated LA County. What is not clear is if you live in Hawthorne and your dog
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 31 4:45 PM
      It will be required by law to have your dog microchipped if you live in
      unincorporated LA County. What is not clear is if you live in Hawthorne and
      your dog and/or you visit unincorporated LA County. Pet owners should now
      be considering what happens if their dog or cat wanders to El Camino
      Village.

      Hawthorne offers free or low cost pet microchipping and Mark Lindberg, who
      is on this email list, is one of the people who do it.

      Contact Hawthorne Animal Control (310)349-2948


      ---

      Owners get extra time to microchip pets
      Many didn't know of new law or faced long waits to comply, so it won't be
      enforced for six months.
      By Alison Hewitt
      Copley News Service

      Pet owners in unincorporated areas who faced a looming deadline for getting
      their dogs spayed or neutered and implanted with microchips gained some
      wiggle room Tuesday when the county Board of Supervisors voted to postpone
      strict enforcement of the new law for six months.

      Fines for pet owners who have not complied were scheduled to take effect
      Sunday. But Supervisor Don Knabe said the Department of Animal Care and
      Control has not done enough to notify people of the new ordinance. Long
      lines and short hours at county shelters during free microchipping clinics
      have also prevented some dog owners from complying, he added.

      "People are calling the shelters and getting busy signals," Knabe said.
      "They're showing up at the clinics and waiting in the sun for hours on end.
      My fear is that, if they can't get it done in time, they'll just ignore it."

      Ernest Coronel, manager of the county's Carson shelter, contended that the
      microchipping clinics at his shelter have gone smoothly.

      "We do it outdoors, but it's pretty shaded, and the average wait is about 10
      to 15 minutes," Coronel said.

      To ensure that all affected pooches receive microchips that will identify
      them, Knabe recommended the Department of Animal Care and Control create a
      list of approved veterinarians who could insert the chips even when county
      clinics are closed for the day.

      "We could do that," said department spokesman Bob Ballenger. "If he wants us
      to put together a list of vets who will work with us on microchipping, we
      can do that. We've already got a list of vets who will spay and neuter at
      our rates."

      Still, veterinarians charge $50 to $100 for microchipping; the county offers
      the service for free, Ballenger pointed out.

      Countywide, 15,000 dogs have had microchips implanted at the six county
      shelters since June, Ballenger said.

      If a microchipped animal becomes separated from its owner, the chip can be
      scanned to reveal the owner's name, phone number and address.

      The law requiring microchips and spaying or neutering applies in
      unincorporated areas of the county, including Athens, Del Aire, El Camino
      Village, La Rambla, Lennox, Marina del Rey and Rancho Dominguez.

      Although all cities within the county have been encouraged to adopt the
      ordinance, only three have done so, none of them in the South Bay, Ballenger
      said.

      Officials hope the ordinance will help cut down on the number of animals in
      county shelters -- where thousands of dogs are euthanized every year -- and
      improve public safety by reducing the number of stray dogs.

      When the penalties take effect in March, dog owners found to be in violation
      of the ordinance could be fined up to $250 for a first-time offense.

      Repeat violators would face fines up to $1,000 and possible imprisonment.
    • Alice
      ... Yay! for microchipping!!! Lisa
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2006
        Brent Morgan wrote:
        >
        > It will be required by law to have your dog microchipped if you live in
        > unincorporated LA County. What is not clear is if you live in
        > Hawthorne and
        > your dog and/or you visit unincorporated LA County. Pet owners should now
        > be considering what happens if their dog or cat wanders to El Camino
        > Village.
        >
        > Hawthorne offers free or low cost pet microchipping and Mark Lindberg,
        > who
        > is on this email list, is one of the people who do it.
        >
        > Contact Hawthorne Animal Control (310)349-2948
        >
        > ---
        >
        > Owners get extra time to microchip pets
        > Many didn't know of new law or faced long waits to comply, so it won't be
        > enforced for six months.
        > By Alison Hewitt
        > Copley News Service
        >
        > Pet owners in unincorporated areas who faced a looming deadline for
        > getting
        > their dogs spayed or neutered and implanted with microchips gained some
        > wiggle room Tuesday when the county Board of Supervisors voted to
        > postpone
        > strict enforcement of the new law for six months.
        >
        > Fines for pet owners who have not complied were scheduled to take effect
        > Sunday. But Supervisor Don Knabe said the Department of Animal Care and
        > Control has not done enough to notify people of the new ordinance. Long
        > lines and short hours at county shelters during free microchipping
        > clinics
        > have also prevented some dog owners from complying, he added.
        >
        > "People are calling the shelters and getting busy signals," Knabe said.
        > "They're showing up at the clinics and waiting in the sun for hours on
        > end.
        > My fear is that, if they can't get it done in time, they'll just
        > ignore it."
        >
        > Ernest Coronel, manager of the county's Carson shelter, contended that
        > the
        > microchipping clinics at his shelter have gone smoothly.
        >
        > "We do it outdoors, but it's pretty shaded, and the average wait is
        > about 10
        > to 15 minutes," Coronel said.
        >
        > To ensure that all affected pooches receive microchips that will identify
        > them, Knabe recommended the Department of Animal Care and Control
        > create a
        > list of approved veterinarians who could insert the chips even when
        > county
        > clinics are closed for the day.
        >
        > "We could do that," said department spokesman Bob Ballenger. "If he
        > wants us
        > to put together a list of vets who will work with us on microchipping, we
        > can do that. We've already got a list of vets who will spay and neuter at
        > our rates."
        >
        > Still, veterinarians charge $50 to $100 for microchipping; the county
        > offers
        > the service for free, Ballenger pointed out.
        >
        > Countywide, 15,000 dogs have had microchips implanted at the six county
        > shelters since June, Ballenger said.
        >
        > If a microchipped animal becomes separated from its owner, the chip
        > can be
        > scanned to reveal the owner's name, phone number and address.
        >
        > The law requiring microchips and spaying or neutering applies in
        > unincorporated areas of the county, including Athens, Del Aire, El Camino
        > Village, La Rambla, Lennox, Marina del Rey and Rancho Dominguez.
        >
        > Although all cities within the county have been encouraged to adopt the
        > ordinance, only three have done so, none of them in the South Bay,
        > Ballenger
        > said.
        >
        > Officials hope the ordinance will help cut down on the number of
        > animals in
        > county shelters -- where thousands of dogs are euthanized every year
        > -- and
        > improve public safety by reducing the number of stray dogs.
        >
        > When the penalties take effect in March, dog owners found to be in
        > violation
        > of the ordinance could be fined up to $250 for a first-time offense.
        >
        > Repeat violators would face fines up to $1,000 and possible imprisonment.
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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        >
        Yay! for microchipping!!!

        Lisa
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