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Re: It is special when we can visit the areas where our ancestors lived.

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  • Fran Bolton
    Clay, you say: when visiting areas where your descendants lived, do not let the court house fires stop you from doing local research. The court house
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2010
      Clay, you say: "when visiting areas where your descendants lived, do not let the "court house fires" stop you from doing local research. The court house records were only one source of historically important documents."

      This is so true! It is amazing what connecting with someone who is familar with the local history and where to find it can do for your research, up close and personal, or from a distance!

      One of my most prized "finds" was courtesy of a member of the genealogy society in the town where my paternal ancestor settled and raised his family in another state. It was a reprint of an old store ledger, actually a combination general store/livery stable/hotel/saloon/gambling hall, from dated 1838-1842.
      I learned a lot about that ancestor, just by reading what purchases he made, and when.
      I would never have known about this book, had the society member not known the descendant of the store owner/ledger keeper who had it reprinted.

      I wholeheartedly recommend asking the genealogy and/or historical society for help if you cannot visit your people's area in person.
      I wholeheartedly recommend visiting your people's area in person when possible, it gives you a feel, a connection, for their time spent there that photos alone cannot give.

      Fran
      PS, when I visited my ancestor's home place genealogy library, I mentioned I was going to the library in the town that was the county seat before his county split. When I arrived, I was met by a very excited patron who was alerted to my research subject, who was also one of his!
      Another "find" I would not have made on my own.
      You guys are worth a million!

      --- In BloodyBillMysterySolvedGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Just Old Clay" <naturaltexasclay@...> wrote:
      >
      > I posted a picture of Glynda Campbell, in our photo section, examining rare and old books about Brown County, on a recent trip from California to Brownwood, Texas.
      >
      > Glynda had a chance to examine these rare and historically significant books at Brownwood Public Library's Genealogy and Local History Branch. She got a copy of Moses G. Anderson's obituary as it was entered by hand in the Pleasant Valley Church's Journals. Moses was the first County Clerk of Brown County, Texas. He was father-in-law to William C. Anderson and father of Martha Elizabeth Anderson, Harriet Anderson Clements and John Anderson, all early residents of Brown County, Texas.
      >
      > Many documents exist in Brown County archives, documenting the lives of it's early residents. Court house fires did not destroy all records. Many records were never housed in the court house to begin with. Examples are available at the State Archives in Austin, in Church Journals, families' albums and files, depositions of court cases made after the fact to re-establish property ownership, wills and estate dispositions, survey field notes, tax records and many more documents.
      >
      > So when visiting areas where your descendants lived, do not let the "court house fires" stop you from doing local research. The court house records were only one source of historically important documents.
      >
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