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2285Re: Two Brownwood Residents

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  • texanamcgee
    Oct 25, 2011
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      They don't because they have family relatives like the HAH lunkhead. And, I take exception to the comment that "members of his own family" went to NM for the funeral. The names listed in the news articles are Anderson family members that are NOT related to HAH. The only Andersons he is really related to are Letha Longley's children and their descendants. HAH is not related to Pat or Charlie or Texas!

      Texana herself

      --- In BloodyBillMysterySolvedGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Fran Bolton" <Jfrbol@...> wrote:
      >
      > Rollie, I still chuckle when I think about how Glynda Campbell told the "hot air historian" (HAH)you mention, that his great aunt was married to the son of William Anderson, Storm Anderson, when his own family never did. That tidbit was embraced, and became his favorite talking point.
      > Still another chuckle, when Sally Goodson provided the "HAH" with the obit of Storm Anderson's death and burial in NM, when his own family never provided that info to him, or that members of his family traveled to NM to attend.
      > And the list goes on. Never a thank you to those informers.
      > Makes one wonder why some families choose not to share with their own.
      >
      > Fran
      >
      >
      > --- In BloodyBillMysterySolvedGroup@yahoogroups.com, "rollie.taylor" <rollietaylor@> wrote:
      > >
      > > This is a story of two Brownwood residents.
      > >
      > > One citizen is an outstanding historian, a productive member of society, talented researcher, member of the Brown County Historical Commission, The Brown County Historical Society, Brown County Heritage Association and the Pecan Valley Genealogical Society. He is also a trustee and volunteer at the Brownwood Public Library, Genealogy and Local History Branch, where he cheerfully devotes many hours to helping patrons find information about their ancestors that lived in Brown County. He graciously spent two days guiding a descendant of Israel and Harriet Anderson Clements over land owned by the pioneer Clements and Anderson families so she could film a documentary. He has retrieved court cases involving William C. Anderson from the Brown County archives; located government land office GLO maps showing the location of William C. Anderson's acreage in 1863; has seen the abstract which shows William C. Anderson patented land in Brown County in 1859; found records showing William C. Anderson was a Brown County taxpayer in 1863; copied old newspaper articles from the archives about the pioneer Anderson family, William Anderson and sons Francis, Dave Q., James N., and William C. Anderson and their arrival in Texas in 1863.
      > >
      > > ---
      > >
      > > The other resident is a conspiracy nut and hot air historian (ha, hah), which he admits every time he adds "ha!" or"hah!" for emphasis after one of his inane statements on his Yahoo board. Nothing but hearsay supports his claim that my great-great-uncle, William C. Anderson of Brown County, was William T. "Bloody Bill" Anderson. Official government records, O R 52 and O R 52 supplement, describe in detail the events leading to the death of William T. Anderson 26 October 1864. William C. Anderson was living in Brown County in 1863. He denies that Francis Marion Anderson was the son of Martha Elizabeth Anderson, even though her name appears as the mother of Francis on his death certificate. He denies that William C. Anderson was the son of William M. and Jane Scruggs Anderson even though the 1894 Goodspeed publication specifically identified James N. Anderson and William C. Anderson as residing in Brown County, Texas, as the 7th and 8th of their nine children. He denies William C. Anderson was a member of the Stone County, Missouri, Anderson family, even though that Anderson family can be followed in census records from Cole County, Missouri, where William C. Anderson said he was born in 1840; to Taney County, Missouri, in 1850; to Stone County, Missouri, in 1860; to Texas in 1870. Instead, he steadfastly claims the 1924 articles written by Henry Clay Fuller, describing William C. Anderson as Bloody Bill after interviewing the 84 year old farmer, constituted a "confession". Yet he willingly accepts census records that show his great-grandmother, Sallie Adams married first, Littlefield, and second, Malone even though he was incapable of searching census records and finding that information himself, and, after living in Brown County for 50 years, had no idea that his grandmother, Sallie Adams Littlefield Malone was buried in Rock Church Cemetery in Brown County. Get the picture? His "research" proves, in his mind, that William C. Anderson was William T. "Bloody Bill" Anderson, yet he is so incompetent that he could not even find that his great-grandmother had remarried, or was buried in Brown County.
      > >
      >
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