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Re: [BirdYak] Fox Sparrow-"Thick-billed" race at White Pass-6 July(?)

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  • Denny Granstrand
    Hi Andy and Yakkers, On June 30, 2007, I took photos of a Fox Sparrow at Leach Lake that Steve Mlodinow said was a Thick-billed Fox Sparrow. Here is a link to
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 9, 2013
      Hi Andy and Yakkers,

      On June 30, 2007, I took photos of a Fox Sparrow at Leach Lake that Steve
      Mlodinow said was a Thick-billed Fox Sparrow. Here is a link to my photos:

      http://www.granstrand.net/gallery/album93

      Notice that the base of the upper and lower mandible are about the same
      high (depth?), which is supposed to be one of the characteristics that
      define Thick-billed Fox Sparrow.

      Denny Granstrand


      On Tue, Jul 9, 2013 at 7:12 AM, Andy Stepniewski <steppie@...> wrote:

      > Yakkers,
      >
      > The "Thick-billed" race of Fox Sparrow, under study for species status, is
      > considered an Oregon and California race. Its northern limits are poorly
      > known.Here is a description of an apparent thick-bill at White Pass:
      >
      > **************************
      >
      > On Friday, July 5, Scott Mills and I found a pair of Fox Sparrows in the
      > horse campground at the east end of Leech Lake, White Pass. Following are
      > my notes, we studied these birds, particularly the male, at leisure, from
      > 1100-1145.
      >
      >
      > 46.6451, -121.3809. Male and female, an apparent mated pair. Their
      > territory
      > was along the road in the horse camp area at the east end of Leech Lake, at
      > a small wetland. The male was singing regularly. When we got too close to
      > shrubbery on the edge of the wetland, the female appeared and both gave
      > sharp, thin, 'tic' note calls, identical to TBSP calls in Sibley app, with
      > no resemblance to typical Fox 'smack' note. We had already been studying
      > the
      > male closely as it had an all gray beak, only visible yellowish tone was
      > near the base of the underside of the lower mandible. The beak also seemed
      > longer than normal for FOSP. Both birds showed crisp, fine, black streaking
      > on the underparts, more sparse than typical for either Slate-colored or
      > Sooty FOSP, with a very prominent central breast spot. Upperparts showed
      > dull rusty wings and tail, with essentially no markings on the wings. Back
      > and rump were unstreaked grayish. Head was grayish, with almost no
      > patterning. Female appeared much more worn than the male. Both birds
      > responded strongly to TBSP call playback, did not show much interest in
      > typical FOSP call playback. Scott got numerous photos, I got video
      > including
      > male call note.
      >
      >
      > I think the combination of call note, gray bill, and character of the
      > streaking all lean strongly towards Thick-billed, or birds with a lot of
      > Thick-billed influence. I'm not sure about the longer appearing beak, but
      > both Scott and I were struck by it, in fact that was one of the first
      > things
      > we noted. Need to spend some time studying these birds in the Oregon
      > Cascades, as well as more specimen work.
      >
      >
      > Bill Tweit
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >


      --
      * * * * * * * * * * * *
      Denny Granstrand
      Yakima, WA
      dgranstrand AT gmail.com
      Denny Granstrand's bird photos can be seen at:

      www.granstrand.net/gallery/


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • A. Kidd
      Hi, I haven t been able to check bird info for a couple of months, so I might have missed answering my own query.   Has anyone been seeing Nighthawks?    
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 11, 2013
        Hi,
        I haven't been able to check bird info for a couple of months, so I might have missed answering my own query.
         
        Has anyone been seeing Nighthawks?     I saw one last night on Coolidge e. of 80th.     I had to doublecheck myself.    When asked, friends said they hadn't been seeing them on the Naches.    Used to see a lot of them there.
         
        Thanks,
        Alice


        ________________________________
        From: Denny Granstrand <dgranstrand@...>
        To: Andy Stepniewski <steppie@...>
        Cc: BirdYak <BirdYak@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, July 9, 2013 12:42 PM
        Subject: Re: [BirdYak] Fox Sparrow-"Thick-billed" race at White Pass-6 July(?)


        Hi Andy and Yakkers,

        On June 30, 2007, I took photos of a Fox Sparrow at Leach Lake that Steve
        Mlodinow said was a Thick-billed Fox Sparrow. Here is a link to my photos:

        http://www.granstrand.net/gallery/album93

        Notice that the base of the upper and lower mandible are about the same
        high (depth?), which is supposed to be one of the characteristics that
        define Thick-billed Fox Sparrow.

        Denny Granstrand


        On Tue, Jul 9, 2013 at 7:12 AM, Andy Stepniewski <steppie@...> wrote:

        > Yakkers,
        >
        > The "Thick-billed" race of Fox Sparrow, under study for species status, is
        > considered an Oregon and California race. Its northern limits are poorly
        > known.Here is a description of an apparent thick-bill at White Pass:
        >
        > **************************
        >
        > On Friday, July 5, Scott Mills and I found a pair of Fox Sparrows in the
        > horse campground at the east end of Leech Lake, White Pass.  Following are
        > my notes, we studied these birds, particularly the male, at leisure, from
        > 1100-1145.
        >
        >
        > 46.6451, -121.3809. Male and female, an apparent mated pair. Their
        > territory
        > was along the road in the horse camp area at the east end of Leech Lake, at
        > a small wetland. The male was singing regularly. When we got too close to
        > shrubbery on the edge of the wetland, the female appeared and both gave
        > sharp, thin, 'tic' note calls, identical to TBSP calls in Sibley app, with
        > no resemblance to typical Fox 'smack' note. We had already been studying
        > the
        > male closely as it had an all gray beak, only visible yellowish tone was
        > near the base of the underside of the lower mandible. The beak also seemed
        > longer than normal for FOSP. Both birds showed crisp, fine, black streaking
        > on the underparts, more sparse than typical for either Slate-colored or
        > Sooty FOSP, with a very prominent central breast spot. Upperparts showed
        > dull rusty wings and tail, with essentially no markings on the wings. Back
        > and rump were unstreaked grayish. Head was grayish, with almost no
        > patterning. Female appeared much more worn than the male. Both birds
        > responded strongly to TBSP call playback, did not show much interest in
        > typical FOSP call playback. Scott got numerous photos, I got video
        > including
        > male call note.
        >
        >
        > I think the combination of call note, gray bill, and character of the
        > streaking all lean strongly towards Thick-billed, or birds with a lot of
        > Thick-billed influence.  I'm not sure about the longer appearing beak, but
        > both Scott and I were struck by it, in fact that was one of the first
        > things
        > we noted.  Need to spend some time studying these birds in the Oregon
        > Cascades, as well as more specimen work.
        >
        >
        > Bill Tweit
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >


        --
        *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *    *
        Denny Granstrand
        Yakima, WA
        dgranstrand AT gmail.com
        Denny Granstrand's bird photos can be seen at:

        www.granstrand.net/gallery/


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Alex Conley
        Lots of nighthawks over Cowiche mountain earlier this week; got dive bombed by one with feathers a fluttering in a loud hooshh - no doubt aimed at the other
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 12, 2013
          Lots of nighthawks over Cowiche mountain earlier this week; got dive bombed
          by one with feathers a fluttering in a loud "hooshh"- no doubt aimed at the
          other nighthawk with him, but near enough at the bottom of his dive to make
          me jump then duck...


          On Thu, Jul 11, 2013 at 2:47 PM, A. Kidd <bearfootn65@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Hi,
          > I haven't been able to check bird info for a couple of months, so I might
          > have missed answering my own query.
          >
          > Has anyone been seeing Nighthawks? I saw one last night on Coolidge e.
          > of 80th. I had to doublecheck myself. When asked, friends said they
          > hadn't been seeing them on the Naches. Used to see a lot of them there.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Alice
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Denny Granstrand <dgranstrand@...>
          > To: Andy Stepniewski <steppie@...>
          > Cc: BirdYak <BirdYak@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Tuesday, July 9, 2013 12:42 PM
          > Subject: Re: [BirdYak] Fox Sparrow-"Thick-billed" race at White Pass-6
          > July(?)
          >
          >
          > Hi Andy and Yakkers,
          >
          > On June 30, 2007, I took photos of a Fox Sparrow at Leach Lake that Steve
          > Mlodinow said was a Thick-billed Fox Sparrow. Here is a link to my photos:
          >
          > http://www.granstrand.net/gallery/album93
          >
          > Notice that the base of the upper and lower mandible are about the same
          > high (depth?), which is supposed to be one of the characteristics that
          > define Thick-billed Fox Sparrow.
          >
          > Denny Granstrand
          >
          > On Tue, Jul 9, 2013 at 7:12 AM, Andy Stepniewski <steppie@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          > > Yakkers,
          > >
          > > The "Thick-billed" race of Fox Sparrow, under study for species status,
          > is
          > > considered an Oregon and California race. Its northern limits are poorly
          > > known.Here is a description of an apparent thick-bill at White Pass:
          > >
          > > **************************
          > >
          > > On Friday, July 5, Scott Mills and I found a pair of Fox Sparrows in the
          > > horse campground at the east end of Leech Lake, White Pass. Following
          > are
          > > my notes, we studied these birds, particularly the male, at leisure, from
          > > 1100-1145.
          > >
          > >
          > > 46.6451, -121.3809. Male and female, an apparent mated pair. Their
          > > territory
          > > was along the road in the horse camp area at the east end of Leech Lake,
          > at
          > > a small wetland. The male was singing regularly. When we got too close to
          > > shrubbery on the edge of the wetland, the female appeared and both gave
          > > sharp, thin, 'tic' note calls, identical to TBSP calls in Sibley app,
          > with
          > > no resemblance to typical Fox 'smack' note. We had already been studying
          > > the
          > > male closely as it had an all gray beak, only visible yellowish tone was
          > > near the base of the underside of the lower mandible. The beak also
          > seemed
          > > longer than normal for FOSP. Both birds showed crisp, fine, black
          > streaking
          > > on the underparts, more sparse than typical for either Slate-colored or
          > > Sooty FOSP, with a very prominent central breast spot. Upperparts showed
          > > dull rusty wings and tail, with essentially no markings on the wings.
          > Back
          > > and rump were unstreaked grayish. Head was grayish, with almost no
          > > patterning. Female appeared much more worn than the male. Both birds
          > > responded strongly to TBSP call playback, did not show much interest in
          > > typical FOSP call playback. Scott got numerous photos, I got video
          > > including
          > > male call note.
          > >
          > >
          > > I think the combination of call note, gray bill, and character of the
          > > streaking all lean strongly towards Thick-billed, or birds with a lot of
          > > Thick-billed influence. I'm not sure about the longer appearing beak,
          > but
          > > both Scott and I were struck by it, in fact that was one of the first
          > > things
          > > we noted. Need to spend some time studying these birds in the Oregon
          > > Cascades, as well as more specimen work.
          > >
          > >
          > > Bill Tweit
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > --
          > * * * * * * * * * * * *
          > Denny Granstrand
          > Yakima, WA
          > dgranstrand AT gmail.com
          > Denny Granstrand's bird photos can be seen at:
          >
          > www.granstrand.net/gallery/
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • redeyed_coyote
          I have been seeing a few in Naches, especially when there is little wind. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 13, 2013
            I have been seeing a few in Naches, especially when there is little wind.<br/><br/><br/>

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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