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Spring yard birds.

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  • Sturnella@aol.com
    Hello There are about a dozen Lincoln s Sparrows and several Song Sparrows along our dry irrigation ditch this morning. Monday and Tuesday there were 5 Western
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 15, 2002
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      Hello

      There are about a dozen Lincoln's Sparrows and several Song Sparrows along
      our dry irrigation ditch this morning.

      Monday and Tuesday there were 5 Western Bluebirds in the adjoining "orchard
      of weeds." These were the first W. Bluebirds I've seen here. Also a
      Townsend's Solitaire was flycatching in the yard.

      Wednesday evening between 6:30 and 7:15 Ron and I watched a steady wave of
      Robins flying south over Konnowac Pass. BIG flocks. I would estimate 200,000
      very conservatively. Believe it or not, even Ron was very impressed and
      watched them until the show was over.

      No blackbirds of any kind here in the last couple days.

      That's all for now.

      Debie
    • Rich712@aol.com
      Chirp, I believe I m going to have to send my computer monitor in for repairs. Can anyone recommend a quality shop with reasonable rates? Even after I cleaned
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 15, 2002
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        Chirp,

        I believe I'm going to have to send my computer monitor in for repairs. Can
        anyone recommend a quality shop with reasonable rates?

        Even after I cleaned the glass (twice), it still appeared that Debie was
        claiming two hundred thousand (mercy be) American Robins in a prolonged
        flight. I'm not sure I've seen that many Robins in my life...and I ain't no
        kid. You could say my generation is a little long in the tooth but lots of
        folks my age are gumming their food.

        The part about them flying south did ring a bell from my working days at the
        Cowiche Post Office. Upon arrival around 7:30 AM, one of my first tasks was
        to raise the flag. Around this time of year that is close to first daylight,
        and staring beyond the top of the pole, I would note loose flocks of Robins
        headed along the same NW corridor that aircraft would be taking in the
        direction of the Y above Naches. Then again in the evening around 5:30 PM
        when I lowered the flag in twilight, I would note loose Robin flocks pumping
        hard going in the exact opposite direction. I assumed they were returning to
        the valley to roost but was never sure if they were just foraging higher up
        during the day or if they were scouting breeding territories. As cold
        evening winds seem to be the norm in Cowiche during Feb and Mar, my second
        theory was that they were full of vinegar in the morning but kept finding the
        higher elevations just too cold for their buns around sunset.

        Later
        Rich
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