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Re: [BirdYak] Falcon tags decoy

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  • willwright26@q.com
    Hi Rich, Retrieve means on the ground. I watched the recent kill closely for about 30 minutes. After hitting a bird in the air, usually with a pile a
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 30, 2009
      Hi Rich,

      Retrieve means on the ground. I watched the recent kill closely for about 30 minutes. After hitting a bird in the air, usually with a pile a feathers flying, the prey will fall to the ground, sometimes only wounded. In this instance, the Peregrine flew to the cackler which was still alive on the ground, and began footing it and tearing at it with its beak. The goose was forced onto its back and the Peregrine tore at the breast, plucking feathers and eventually the meat, as the goose weakly flopped its wings and paddled its feet. After some time, the Peregrine did drag the goose along the ground, but it would be a stretch to imagine it flying more than a few feet with such a load.

      ---Will


      From: Rich712@...
      Sent: Monday, November 30, 2009 6:58 PM
      To: willwright26@... ; downess@... ; jeffk@...
      Cc: BirdYak@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [BirdYak] Falcon tags decoy




      In a message dated 11/30/2009 6:03:38 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, willwright26@... writes:
      the usual M.O. is to scare the ducks up and take them in the air with a blow from clenched talons, then return to retrieve them on the ground

      Will and Yakkers,

      By "retrieve them" are you stating that the falcon has flown off with the large prey items or do they settle in on the ground to pluck and tear? Also curious about the Cackler kill you witnessed...was it struck while in the air? And was it carried off?

      I'm wondering if a falcon's narrow pointed wings limit wing loading...broad/wide winged raptors as buteos and eagles would seem to have greater lifting ability.

      Really fascinating that Peregrines knock off small geese. And thanks for tossing in the old "duck hawk" name.
      Later,
      Rich
      Befuddled Birder by 3700 Bonnie Boone

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jeff Kozma
      I guess it would be conceivable that the falcon meant to scare the ducks up as it attacked, which, like Will said, would be the usual M.O. However, decoys are
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 1 8:39 AM
        I guess it would be conceivable that the falcon meant to scare the ducks
        up as it attacked, which, like Will said, would be the usual M.O.
        However, decoys are destined to just sit there, unknown to the falcon of
        course, and when they "didn't flush", was forced to hit the "duck" on
        the water? Just speculating here. If it had hit a real duck like that
        on the water, would it be conceivable that a peregrine could grab it as
        it hit it to carry it the short distance to shore with its momentum from
        the attack. Since I was hunting from shore, the most a falcon would
        have had to carry the duck would be about 30 yards to the bank of the
        river.

        By the way, if you haven't looked, check out the pics of the goshawk
        taking a Short-eared Owl that Scott Ray posted. Really fascinating.

        Jeff

        Rich712@... wrote:

        >
        >
        > In a message dated 11/30/2009 6:03:38 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
        > willwright26@... writes:
        >
        > the usual M.O. is to scare the ducks up and take them in the air
        > with a blow from clenched talons, then return to retrieve them on
        > the ground
        >
        > Will and Yakkers,
        >
        > By "retrieve them" are you stating that the falcon has flown off
        > with the large prey items or do they settle in on the ground to
        > pluck and tear? Also curious about the Cackler kill you
        > witnessed...was it struck while in the air? And was it carried off?
        >
        > I'm wondering if a falcon's narrow pointed wings limit wing
        > loading...broad/wide winged raptors as buteos and eagles would
        > seem to have greater lifting ability.
        >
        > Really fascinating that Peregrines knock off small geese. And
        > thanks for tossing in the old "duck hawk" name.
        >
        > Later,
        > Rich
        > Befuddled Birder by 3700 Bonnie Boone



        --



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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