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Anna's Hummingbird

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  • avijenee
    Hello Yakkers, Last evening during the last vestiges of light, a hummingbird sipped furtively from our sugar-water feeder. It dashed off to the confines of our
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 30 12:33 PM
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      Hello Yakkers,

      Last evening during the last vestiges of light, a hummingbird sipped furtively from our sugar-water feeder. It dashed off to the confines of our cedar, leaving us wondering about it's identity. As the sun came up this morning, out popped a immature male Anna's Hummingbird, once again seeking the feeder. A long draw on the sugar-water and off he flew.

      Jenny Graevell
      East Wenatchee, Wa.
    • kozma.jeff
      This morning (about 5 minutes ago) had an Anna s Hummingbird checking out a few salvia blossoms still alive in a planter on my back patio. I was totally
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 31, 2010
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        This morning (about 5 minutes ago) had an Anna's Hummingbird checking out a few salvia blossoms still alive in a planter on my back patio. I was totally shocked!

        Jeff Kozma

        Yakima (Terrace Heights)
      • Scott Downes
        Our immature male Anna s (getting to have a mostly red throat and partial red head now) was joined yesterday by a female. She hasn t stuck at the feeder long
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 30, 2011
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          Our immature male Anna's (getting to have a mostly red throat and partial red head now) was joined yesterday by a female. She hasn't stuck at the feeder long enough to determine if adult or immature female. The male sits in the birch tree most of the time singing away. This male has been here since mid August.

          Scott Downes
          downess@...
          Yakima WA

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jeff Kozma
          Hi Yakkers, Tonight while eating dinner, we noticed an unusual hummingbird at our feeder. It had an overall gray appearance resembling an Anna’s Hummingbird
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 16, 2012
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            Hi Yakkers,



            Tonight while eating dinner, we noticed an unusual hummingbird at our
            feeder. It had an overall gray appearance resembling an Anna�s Hummingbird
            and it appeared larger than the Black-chinned Hummingbirds. It took off
            but I later got a look at it in our front hummingbird garden and it had a
            partial rose-red pink gorget resembling an immature male Anna�s, though may
            be an adult female but unsure. In any event, it definitely is not a
            Black-chinned by the gorget color nor is it a Rufous because it has no
            rusty coloration what-so-ever. It is busy chasing other hummers around the
            yard and I will post again if it sticks around. My gardens are in full
            bloom with Monarda, Zauschneria, Agastache, Salvia and a large trumpet vine
            so hopefully in addition to the feeder which it is also using, it will hang
            out for a while and not be simply passing through. That makes four species
            of hummers in my yard this week, with a Calliope this morning and 2 Rufous
            hummers over the weekend.



            Jeff Kozma



            Terrace Heights


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Andy Stepniewski
            All, Over the past 60 years, with the widespread advent of feeders in urban yards, Anna s Hummingbirds have undergone a dramatic range extension west of the
            Message 5 of 12 , Jul 17, 2012
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              All,

              Over the past 60 years, with the widespread advent of feeders in urban
              yards, Anna's Hummingbirds have undergone a dramatic range extension west of
              the Cascade crest from northwestern California north to southwestern BC
              (Zimmerman, D.A. 1773. Range extension of Anna's Hummingbirds. American
              Birds. 27: 827-835).. As the numbers of this species continue to increase
              west of the Cascade crest, we have seen an increase in the number of fall
              wanderers, usually males. Fall arrivals in Yakima County, over the past 15
              years or so, have typically begun in late August, and increase through the
              fall. Thus, rather than flying south after breeding, these wanderers show
              evidence of a species trying to colonize new regions. However, I believe
              there is still no evidence Anna's Hummingbirds are breeding in eastern
              Washington.

              A number of Yakima County birds have attempted to overwinter at feeders. On
              the west side, where winter temps reach the 40s on many winter days, many
              tiny insects fly about, possibly a critical supplement in their winter diet.
              Here, in Yakima, we can experience periods of subfreezing temps for several
              weeks straight. Flying insects may be close to nonexistent during these
              periods of extended cold . This hummer may weaken on a diet solely of sugar
              water and mortality might be the norm. I suggest winter cold might be the
              factor limiting colonization of Anna's Hummingbirds in eastern Washington on
              a year-round basis.

              Andy Stepniewski
              Wapato WA
              steppie@...

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Jeff Kozma" <kozj@...>
              To: <BirdYak@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, July 16, 2012 6:57 PM
              Subject: [BirdYak] Anna's Hummingbird


              Hi Yakkers,



              Tonight while eating dinner, we noticed an unusual hummingbird at our
              feeder. It had an overall gray appearance resembling an Anna's Hummingbird
              and it appeared larger than the Black-chinned Hummingbirds. It took off
              but I later got a look at it in our front hummingbird garden and it had a
              partial rose-red pink gorget resembling an immature male Anna's, though may
              be an adult female but unsure. In any event, it definitely is not a
              Black-chinned by the gorget color nor is it a Rufous because it has no
              rusty coloration what-so-ever. It is busy chasing other hummers around the
              yard and I will post again if it sticks around. My gardens are in full
              bloom with Monarda, Zauschneria, Agastache, Salvia and a large trumpet vine
              so hopefully in addition to the feeder which it is also using, it will hang
              out for a while and not be simply passing through. That makes four species
              of hummers in my yard this week, with a Calliope this morning and 2 Rufous
              hummers over the weekend.



              Jeff Kozma



              Terrace Heights


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

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            • willwright26@q.com
              A related factor to consider is the ability of self induced torpor, a survival mechanism. ... From: Andy Stepniewski To:
              Message 6 of 12 , Jul 17, 2012
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                A related factor to consider is the ability of self induced torpor, a survival mechanism.

                ---Will, Corvallis, Ore.

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Andy Stepniewski" <steppie@...>
                To: BirdYak@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Kozma" <kozj@...>
                Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2012 7:21:44 AM
                Subject: Re: [BirdYak] Anna's Hummingbird






                All,

                Over the past 60 years, with the widespread advent of feeders in urban
                yards, Anna's Hummingbirds have undergone a dramatic range extension west of
                the Cascade crest from northwestern California north to southwestern BC
                (Zimmerman, D.A. 1773. Range extension of Anna's Hummingbirds. American
                Birds. 27: 827-835).. As the numbers of this species continue to increase
                west of the Cascade crest, we have seen an increase in the number of fall
                wanderers, usually males. Fall arrivals in Yakima County, over the past 15
                years or so, have typically begun in late August, and increase through the
                fall. Thus, rather than flying south after breeding, these wanderers show
                evidence of a species trying to colonize new regions. However, I believe
                there is still no evidence Anna's Hummingbirds are breeding in eastern
                Washington.

                A number of Yakima County birds have attempted to overwinter at feeders. On
                the west side, where winter temps reach the 40s on many winter days, many
                tiny insects fly about, possibly a critical supplement in their winter diet.
                Here, in Yakima, we can experience periods of subfreezing temps for several
                weeks straight. Flying insects may be close to nonexistent during these
                periods of extended cold . This hummer may weaken on a diet solely of sugar
                water and mortality might be the norm. I suggest winter cold might be the
                factor limiting colonization of Anna's Hummingbirds in eastern Washington on
                a year-round basis.

                Andy Stepniewski
                Wapato WA
                steppie@...

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Jeff Kozma" < kozj@... >
                To: < BirdYak@yahoogroups.com >
                Sent: Monday, July 16, 2012 6:57 PM
                Subject: [BirdYak] Anna's Hummingbird

                Hi Yakkers,

                Tonight while eating dinner, we noticed an unusual hummingbird at our
                feeder. It had an overall gray appearance resembling an Anna's Hummingbird
                and it appeared larger than the Black-chinned Hummingbirds. It took off
                but I later got a look at it in our front hummingbird garden and it had a
                partial rose-red pink gorget resembling an immature male Anna's, though may
                be an adult female but unsure. In any event, it definitely is not a
                Black-chinned by the gorget color nor is it a Rufous because it has no
                rusty coloration what-so-ever. It is busy chasing other hummers around the
                yard and I will post again if it sticks around. My gardens are in full
                bloom with Monarda, Zauschneria, Agastache, Salvia and a large trumpet vine
                so hopefully in addition to the feeder which it is also using, it will hang
                out for a while and not be simply passing through. That makes four species
                of hummers in my yard this week, with a Calliope this morning and 2 Rufous
                hummers over the weekend.

                Jeff Kozma

                Terrace Heights

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                ------------------------------------

                Yahoo! Groups Links




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • kozma.jeff
                I am home sick today with a cold and was rewarded to see an Anna s Hummingbird visiting the honeymelon sage on my back patio. I didn t get a good look at the
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 24 4:09 PM
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                  I am home sick today with a cold and was rewarded to see an Anna's Hummingbird visiting the honeymelon sage on my back patio. I didn't get a good look at the throat, but I didn't notice any color like the bird I saw earlier in July.


                  Jeff Kozma

                  Yakima (Terrace Heights)
                • Linda
                  Greetings! As of yesterday afternoon we had a female Anna s Hummingbird at our hummingbird feeder in the suburbs of White Swan. We ve been able to see it
                  Message 8 of 12 , Oct 13, 2012
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                    Greetings!

                    As of yesterday afternoon we had a female Anna's Hummingbird at our hummingbird feeder in the suburbs of White Swan. We've been able to see it rather briefly in the mid-afternoon for the past couple weeks. It rarely lingers very long. We have a large crop of those pesky little bugs that appear in the fall and so am assuming it must be dining on them and late blooming flowers.

                    Linda, the old rookie birder in White Swan
                  • Linda
                    Greetings! As of 4 PM today (24 Oct. 2012) the female Ann s Hummingbird was still coming to my feeder. She made several visits in the morning which is a change
                    Message 9 of 12 , Oct 24, 2012
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                      Greetings!
                      As of 4 PM today (24 Oct. 2012) the female Ann's Hummingbird was still
                      coming to my feeder. She made several visits in the morning which is a
                      change in habit as she had been visiting in the afternoon only up until
                      today.
                      Also at the seed feeders: White-crowned, Golden-crowned and House
                      Sparrows, the three different kinds of Junco, House Finches, California
                      Quail and Eurasian-collared Doves.
                      In my trees: Magpies, Northern Flickers and Red-tailed Hawk.
                      Also need to report that the Wild Turkeys at Fort Simcoe which numbered
                      2 adults and 5 young in August, and 2 adults and 4 young in September
                      are now a flock of 2 adults and 3 young. Am getting calls from 2
                      different Great Horned Owls in the fort area but only had one brief
                      sighting.
                      Linda King, the old rookie birder in White Swan




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Michael Roper
                      I was watching a swallowtail in our butterfly bush this afternoon when an Anna s Hummingbird zoomed in to chase it off. My 1st year bird in over a month. Mike
                      Message 10 of 12 , Aug 6, 2013
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                        I was watching a swallowtail in our butterfly bush this afternoon when an Anna's Hummingbird zoomed in to chase it off. My 1st year bird in over a month.
                        Mike Roper
                        Terrace Heights
                      • Jeff Kozma
                        I had what looked to be an immature Anna s Hummingbird in the garden this afternoon nectaring at Crocosmia and bee balm. I couldn t see any color on the
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jun 21
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                          I had what looked to be an immature Anna's Hummingbird in the garden this afternoon nectaring at Crocosmia and bee balm.  I couldn't see any color on the throat to signify an adult female.  This is the earliest I've had an Anna's visit...with previous early sighting as July 16. 

                          Jeff

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