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Re: Saw-whet or Pygmy ?

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  • Phyllis
    Thanks Andy, I didn t think it was a Screech-Owl as I ve heard them and this had a completely different sound. After reading the written description in the
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 24 1:24 AM
      Thanks Andy,
      I didn't think it was a Screech-Owl as I've heard them and this had a completely different sound. After reading the written description in the Peterson Guide for Northern Saw-Whet, "...repeated mechanically in endless succession, often 100-130 times per minute..." this really fits what I heard.
      I have 8 big deciduous trees and 2 big pine trees, and several neighbors have big trees too. Also orchards and pasture around.
      When I heard it, it made a big circle around through the trees, vocalizing the whole time and the cadence was very even, no bouncing ball effect.
      Anyway, it's fun, and a new sound for me. Hope I hear it again. I'd never be able to see it as these tress are too big and thick.
      Thanks again,
      Phyllis



      --- In BirdYak@yahoogroups.com, "Andy Stepniewski" <steppie@...> wrote:
      >
      > Phyllis,
      >
      > The most likely suspect is Western Screech-Owl, as this species is a regular resident in low elevation areas with abundant big trees (riparian areas or residential districts full of big, old trees). Pygmy should only be in the mountains at this season and doesn't call at midnight, at least in my experience. Saw-whets, too, are mostly in the mountains at this season. A few breed in the lower elevations, as in tall gallery forest along the Yakima River. I suppose it might be found in residential areas with lots of mature trees, but this would be an uncommon occurrence.
      >
      > Your question is indeed a very good one!
      >
      > Andy Stepniewski
      > Wapato WA
      > steppie@...
      >
    • Scott Downes
      Saw-whets do occasionally nest in the lowlands. There is a record of saw-whets nesting on Columbia NWR from about 15 years ago. There are also records of
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 24 7:41 AM
        Saw-whets do occasionally nest in the lowlands. There is a record of saw-whets nesting on Columbia NWR from about 15 years ago. There are also records of saw-whets nesting on the Boardman, OR Tree Farm in boxes (the Columbia NWR bird was using a wood duck box).

        Scott Downes
        Yakima-near 50th and Englewood in our new house and building a new yard list

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Phyllis
        To: BirdYak@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2009 1:24 AM
        Subject: [BirdYak] Re: Saw-whet or Pygmy ?





        Thanks Andy,
        I didn't think it was a Screech-Owl as I've heard them and this had a completely different sound. After reading the written description in the Peterson Guide for Northern Saw-Whet, "...repeated mechanically in endless succession, often 100-130 times per minute..." this really fits what I heard.
        I have 8 big deciduous trees and 2 big pine trees, and several neighbors have big trees too. Also orchards and pasture around.
        When I heard it, it made a big circle around through the trees, vocalizing the whole time and the cadence was very even, no bouncing ball effect.
        Anyway, it's fun, and a new sound for me. Hope I hear it again. I'd never be able to see it as these tress are too big and thick.
        Thanks again,
        Phyllis


        --- In BirdYak@yahoogroups.com, "Andy Stepniewski" <steppie@...> wrote:
        >
        > Phyllis,
        >
        > The most likely suspect is Western Screech-Owl, as this species is a regular resident in low elevation areas with abundant big trees (riparian areas or residential districts full of big, old trees). Pygmy should only be in the mountains at this season and doesn't call at midnight, at least in my experience. Saw-whets, too, are mostly in the mountains at this season. A few breed in the lower elevations, as in tall gallery forest along the Yakima River. I suppose it might be found in residential areas with lots of mature trees, but this would be an uncommon occurrence.
        >
        > Your question is indeed a very good one!
        >
        > Andy Stepniewski
        > Wapato WA
        > steppie@...
        >





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