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Yakima and Toppenish Christmas Bird Counts

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  • Andy Stepniewski
    Denny, I thought I d send out an immediate release. Anything to add for this? What about the gull? I ll send it out as soon as you give it your blessing.
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 17, 2001
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      Denny,

      I thought I'd send out an "immediate release." Anything to add for this?
      What about the gull? I'll send it out as soon as you give it your blessing.

      Andy
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Andy Stepniewski <steppie@...>
      To: <BirdYak@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, December 17, 2001 7:45 AM
      Subject: Yakima and Toppenish Christmas Bird Counts


      Yakkers,

      More detailed news will follow in the January Calliope Crier, but several
      interesting or rare birds were noted on the just
      completed Yakima and Toppenish Christmas Bird Counts.

      Both counts tallied 83 species (preliminary totals), both found waterfowl
      numbers to be lower than expected. "Northern" birds such as Rough-legged
      Hawk, Merlin, Bohemian Waxwing, Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler, Dark-eyed
      (Slate-colored) Junco, American Tree Sparrow, were generally scarce or
      absent. The outstanding exceptions were Harris's Sparrow and Common Redpoll.
      Redpolls are erratic visitors, breeding in the subarctic willow and birch
      thickets of Alaska and Canada, have staged a bit of an invasion
      intoWashington this fall.

      The Yakima count had a number of great sightings. An Eurasian Wigeon was
      found in a flock of about 20
      American Wigeons on the Yakima River. Three Red-breasted Mergansers were in
      a large flock of ducks on the Yakima River in East Selah near the heron
      rookery. A flock of about 20 Common Redpolls were seen in White Birch trees
      near Holy Rosary Cemetary east of Moxee (take SR-24 east from I-82 past
      Moxee, cemetary road is marked on left).

      At Toppenish, several "warm weather" birds longered. A flock of 37
      Sandhill Cranes flying over Toppenish Ridge and a Say's Phoebe near the
      Toppenish NWR were most notable. Good numbers of Yellow-rumped (Audubon's)
      Warblers were also found. Redpolls were seen near Harrah, too, on the
      Toppenish count. A flock of about 13 was noted south of Harrah, also in
      Paper Birches at the corner of Lateral C and Fort Roads; this flock is also
      flying into the weedy
      growth east of Lateral C around "Charlie's Pond. These birds were originally
      found by Kerry Turley while scouting for the Christmas count about a week
      ago; they seem to be staying around.

      Purple Finch, seen for a number of years on the Mount Adams Golf Course, but
      absent for the past eight years, were seen there again with 10 female
      plumaged birds being observed.

      More in the January Crier. Thanks so much for your great work on these
      counts!

      Have great Christmas!

      Andy Stepniewski and Denny Granstrand
      Yakima Valley Audubon Society
    • Andy Stepniewski
      Yakkers, More details will follow, but several rare birds were noted on the just completed Yakima and Toppenish Christmas Bird Counts. Both counts tallied 83
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 17, 2001
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        Yakkers,

        More details will follow, but several rare birds were noted on the just
        completed Yakima and Toppenish Christmas Bird Counts.

        Both counts tallied 83 species (preliminary totals), both found waterfowl
        numbers to be lower than expected. "Northern" birds such as Rough-legged
        Hawk, Merlin, Bohemian Waxwing, Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler, Dark-eyed
        (Slate-colored) Junco, American Tree Sparrow, were generally scarce or
        absent. The outstanding exceptions were Harris's Sparrow and Common Redpoll.

        However, several "warm weather" birds longered. A flock of 37 Sandhill
        Cranes flying over Toppenish Ridge and a Say's Phoebe near the Toppenish NWR
        were most notable. Good numbers of Yellow-rumped (Audubon's Warblers were
        also found.

        Common Redpoll, an erratic visitor from the subarctic willow and birch
        thickets of Alaska and Canada, has staged a bit of an invasion into
        Washington this fall. One fock of about 20 was noted in the row of Paper
        Birch trees on the road into Holy Rosary Cemetary east of Moxee (take SR-24
        east from I-82, east past Moxee, cemetary road is marked on left). Another
        flock of about 13 was noted south of Harrah, also in Paper Birches at the
        corner of Lateral C and Fort Roads(this flock is also flying into the weedy
        growth east of Lateral C around "Charlie's Pond). These birds were
        originally found by Kerry Turley while scouting for the Christmas count
        about a week ago and seems to be staying around.

        Andy Stepniewski
        Wapato WA
        steppie@...
      • Sturnella@aol.com
        Denny In case you didn t see a White-throated Sparrow for the count, there is one at my feeder right now, for count week . It is a tan striped one with a
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 19, 2001
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          Denny
          In case you didn't see a White-throated Sparrow for the count, there is one
          at my feeder right now, for 'count week'. It is a tan striped one with a
          white throat.
          Debie
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