Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Pine Siskin

Expand Messages
  • Mike Roper
    It s a few days late for the bird count but a small group of Pine Siskin have arrived to feed with the Goldfinch on our thistle sacks. Mike Roper Terrace
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 19, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      It's a few days late for the bird count but a small group of Pine Siskin
      have arrived to feed with the Goldfinch on our thistle sacks.

      Mike Roper

      Terrace Heights



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • kozma.jeff
      I had a Pine Siskin at my feeder yesterday afternoon. I thought this was an unusual bird to have in my yard in August, even though I suspect some breed in
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 6, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        I had a Pine Siskin at my feeder yesterday afternoon. I thought this was an unusual bird to have in my yard in August, even though I suspect some breed in town (Yakima).

        Jeff Kozma

        Terrace Heights
      • Andy Stepniewski
        All, I hear siskins all during the breeding season in Yakima, all within a hard-to-define older district. Bounded on the east by say 14th Ave north to
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 6, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          All,

          I hear siskins all during the breeding season in Yakima, all within a hard-to-define "older district." Bounded on the east by say 14th Ave north to Lincoln, west to about 32nd. I further leap here but I'd say the common thread habitat-wise, is mature spruce. It seems a bit of a stretch that this is all there is to their habitat requirements. Possibly it's a diversity of ornamentals is present that meets the bill. However, I guess I'm willing to wager mature spruce is an important component defining siskin habitat in Yakima, at least during the breeding season. Other thoughts from those that reside in siskin habitat??

          Andy Stepniewski
          Wapato WA
          steppie@...

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: kozma.jeff
          To: BirdYak@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, August 06, 2012 8:47 AM
          Subject: [BirdYak] Pine Siskin



          I had a Pine Siskin at my feeder yesterday afternoon. I thought this was an unusual bird to have in my yard in August, even though I suspect some breed in town (Yakima).

          Jeff Kozma

          Terrace Heights





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Rich712@aol.com
          Chirp, This is the first year I recall having siskins during the breeding season in my neighborhood. I live just east of the 38th Avenue side of Fisher Golf
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 6, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Chirp,

            This is the first year I recall having siskins during the breeding season in my neighborhood. I live just east of the 38th Avenue side of Fisher Golf Course. The course has a mix of conifers and a couple neighbors do have what I think are "blue spruce." Past winter, an adult bald eagle perched regularly in a Chinese Elm at the course. I've often thought the golf course is responsible for the odd "birdies" and "eagles" that I have carded on my yard list.

            Rich
            Befuddled Birder at 3700 Bonnie Boon



            -----Original Message-----
            From: Andy Stepniewski <steppie@...>
            To: BirdYak <BirdYak@yahoogroups.com>; kozma.jeff <kozj@...>
            Sent: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 7:56 pm
            Subject: Re: [BirdYak] Pine Siskin





            All,

            I hear siskins all during the breeding season in Yakima, all within a hard-to-define "older district." Bounded on the east by say 14th Ave north to Lincoln, west to about 32nd. I further leap here but I'd say the common thread habitat-wise, is mature spruce. It seems a bit of a stretch that this is all there is to their habitat requirements. Possibly it's a diversity of ornamentals is present that meets the bill. However, I guess I'm willing to wager mature spruce is an important component defining siskin habitat in Yakima, at least during the breeding season. Other thoughts from those that reside in siskin habitat??

            Andy Stepniewski
            Wapato WA
            steppie@...










            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Scott Downes
            When we lived at our old house on N18th Ave and corner of Browne Ave. I noted fledgling siskins at the feeders in August. Unlikely to have been dispersals from
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 7, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              When we lived at our old house on N18th Ave and corner of Browne Ave. I noted fledgling siskins at the feeders in August. Unlikely to have been dispersals from mountains as they were still doing begging calls to adults indicating fairly recent (and nearby) fledging.

              Scott Downes
              downess@...
              Yakima WA

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: kevinslucas
              To: BirdYak@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, August 07, 2012 11:11 AM
              Subject: [BirdYak] Re: Pine Siskin



              Living in Andy's described area, near 18th Ave on Greenway, we've had several Pine Siskins visiting our feeders continuously through this year. My feeling was that they were nesting nearby. In our neighborhood I often hear them in large conifers, including one across the street. I've not tried to see a nest. Maybe that's a challenge for next year. The Birder's Handbook, Ehrlich, et al, says they nest far out on limbs, 8' - 50' up, & are often "semicolonial, only a few feet between nests."
              We've also had Red-breasted Nuthatches breed here. The young have a funny call and sometimes wobble, perched on telephone wires, teeter tooting. Pete Dunne notes them as cohabitants of Pine Siskins.

              Kevin Lucas
              Yakima, WA

              --- In BirdYak@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Kozma <kozj@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks everyone, for the PISI responses. I had them in summer when I lived
              > in West Valley, again where there are more conifers planted as
              > ornamentals. I�ll chalk this one up to post-breeding dispersal (possibly a
              > juvenile) as that seems most likely based on the discussion and where I
              > live.
              >
              >
              >
              > Thanks again.
              >
              >
              >
              > Jeff
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > *From:* BirdYak@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BirdYak@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf
              > Of *willwright26@...
              > *Sent:* Monday, August 06, 2012 9:38 PM
              > *To:* BirdYak
              > *Subject:* Fwd: [BirdYak] Pine Siskin
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ----- Forwarded Message -----
              > From: willwright26@...
              > To: "Andy Stepniewski" <steppie@...>
              > Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 8:32:38 PM
              > Subject: Re: [BirdYak] Pine Siskin
              >
              > I find tons of siskins at higher altitudes during the breeding season.
              > During summer, usually not in the lower elevations, such as here at my home
              > in Corvallis, Ore., which is at 235 feet. However, today, I had a Pine
              > Siskin visit my thistle feeder along with the Lesser Goldfinches. I suspect
              > post breeding dispersal. This pattern (it has occurred before, and Siskins
              > are expected in spring and fall, with variable reports over the winter)
              > does not hold near the coast, where higher elevation birds such as
              > crossbills, chestnut-backed chickadees, and siskins will be at feeders on
              > the shore. Of course, sitka spruce occurs shoreline up to 15 miles inland,
              > adding to Andy's hypothesis. Dispersal accounts for many movements, and is
              > important in survival of a species, even if it sometimes leads to death
              > (Snowy Owl).
              >
              > ---Will Wright
              > Corvallis, Ore.
              >
              > ----- Forwarded Message -----
              > From: "Andy Stepniewski" <steppie@...>
              > To: BirdYak@yahoogroups.com, "kozma.jeff" <kozj@...>
              > Sent: Monday, August 6, 2012 7:07:41 PM
              > Subject: Re: [BirdYak] Pine Siskin
              >
              > All,
              >
              > I hear siskins all during the breeding season in Yakima, all within a
              > hard-to-define "older district." Bounded on the east by say 14th Ave north
              > to Lincoln, west to about 32nd. I further leap here but I'd say the common
              > thread habitat-wise, is mature spruce. It seems a bit of a stretch that
              > this is all there is to their habitat requirements. Possibly it's a
              > diversity of ornamentals is present that meets the bill. However, I guess
              > I'm willing to wager mature spruce is an important component defining
              > siskin habitat in Yakima, at least during the breeding season. Other
              > thoughts from those that reside in siskin habitat??
              >
              > Andy Stepniewski
              > Wapato WA
              > steppie@...
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: kozma.jeff
              > To: BirdYak@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Monday, August 06, 2012 8:47 AM
              > Subject: [BirdYak] Pine Siskin
              >
              > I had a Pine Siskin at my feeder yesterday afternoon. I thought this was an
              > unusual bird to have in my yard in August, even though I suspect some breed
              > in town (Yakima).
              >
              > Jeff Kozma
              >
              > Terrace Heights
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.