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Fw: Washtucna, Lyons Ferry and Sentinel Bluffs, RBA: TENNESSE WARBLER; SCOUTING FOR YVAS FIELDTRIP SAT SEPT 8

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  • Scott Downes
    Here is the message I sent to tweeters of my scouting for next weekend s trip. While I can t promise a rarity, similar numbers of the other birds are likely.
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 2, 2007
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      Here is the message I sent to tweeters of my scouting for next weekend's
      trip. While I can't promise a rarity, similar numbers of the other birds are
      likely. We are still meeting at 6 am at Kmart on Saturday the 8th (I want to
      leave promptly at 6, so please be on time). I'd like to have everyone in 3
      cars, so still have room for a half dozen or so, but please do contact me if
      you haven't already if intending to go. I'd expect to be back around 6:30-7,
      bird abundance and weather dictating the exact time. For the 4 people who
      have already signed up I have you down. We'll do lunch on the go, so plan
      accordingly.

      Scott Downes
      downess@...


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Scott Downes" <downess@...>
      To: <tweeters@...>; <inland-nw-birders@...>
      Sent: Sunday, September 02, 2007 4:36 PM
      Subject: Washtucna, Lyons Ferry and Sentinel Bluffs, RBA: TENNESSE WARBLER


      > Just got home a little bit ago from a very busy two days. I birded
      > Washtucna, Lyons Ferry, Lind Coulee and Sentinel Bluffs yesterday. As the
      > headline states I got a brief but diagnostic views of a TENNESSEE WARBLER,
      > an adult male in fall plumage I believe. Details on that later.
      >
      > I arrived in Washtucna yesterday morning around 8 am, the Sullivans and
      > Steve Mlodinow's group were already busy tracking down the migrants. I
      felt
      > a little better knowing a group of westsiders had beat me to the spot by
      > learning that both had stayed over Friday night. They may have other
      > highlights to post, but I'll put in my highlights. Washtucna wasn't
      > extremely birdy, but did have a nice mix of a few TOWNSEND'S WARBLER,
      > WILSON'S, YELLOW and YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, 2 OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, 1
      > LEAST FLYCATCHER, a few DUSKY, HAMMOND'S and 1 PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER
      > quite a few WARBLING VIREO, 1 CASSIN'S VIREO, 4 LINCOLN SPARROW, 1 FOX
      > SPARROW (slate-colored) and at least 2 EURASIAN-COLLARED DOVE (is that
      even
      > a highlight any longer at Washtucna?).
      >
      > On to Lyons ferry where I arrived about 9:45 and found the place crawling
      > with WILSON'S and YELLOW WARBLER, more than 50 of each in the park. Also
      > present here was 1 NASHVILLE WARBLER, good amounts of WARBLING VIREO
      again,
      > 1 CASSIN'S VIREO, HAMMOND'S and DUSKY FLYCATCHERS, 1 GRAY FLYCATCHER, 1
      > LEAST FLYCATCHER and I managed to flush out both BARN and GREAT-HORNED OWL
      > from the island in addition to flushing a BLACK_CROWNED NIGHT HERON as I
      > walked out the island.
      >
      > A brief stop at Lind Coulee found the place nearly devoid of Shorebirds,
      > only 2 Western Sandpipers and a STILT SANDPIPER were present.
      >
      > I arrived at Sentinel Bluffs near Mattawa about 3:15 and on first
      inspection
      > the place appeared to be quite dead. On second look there were a few birds
      > around including about 20 Yellow-rumpred Warblers, 15 or so Warbling
      Vireo,
      > at least 2 Dusky Flycatcher and then it got interesting. About 3:50 I was
      > watching Yellow-rumps and Warbling Vireos in a tree when I saw a very
      small
      > warbler take flight and issue a very distinctive flight call, think
      > Golden-crowned Kinglet with a microphone and a husky voice (for those that
      > can't imagine, a high thin tseet call that is clearly audible and don't
      have
      > to strain to hear like you do with Kinglets). I watched this bird fly into
      > the top of a cottonwood and begin to rapidly, and I do mean rapidly move
      > about and forage. Staying on this bird for as long as I did was tough.
      When
      > the bird landed two things immediately jumped out at me, teeny-tiny little
      > stubby tail and the undertail coverts appeared to be almost snow white in
      > the afternoon sun, the snow white seemed to run clear into the tail.
      > Beginning to realize what I had I quickly moved up the bird that was
      moving
      > very quickly.. the lower breast was darker, though I'd call it
      > off-white/gray and not olive or tinged with yellow. The wings appeared
      > longish, though that could have been a function of the short stubby tail,
      > the primary projection I'd estimate came about halfway down the tail. I
      only
      > got very quick looks at the head and back as mostly I was looking up at
      this
      > bird and trying frantically to follow it... head and bill, classic
      Vermivora
      > warbler shape or a sharp-thin bill. The head and back seemed more grayish
      > than olive, part of that was likely real if this was an adult male in fall
      > plumage, part could have been the lighting. The brief look I got at the
      back
      > was olive, not yellowish/olive and the flanks appeared to be mostly
      grayish
      > with what I thought was a hint of olive color though it was brief enough
      > can't say for sure other than the grayish color. While the view was
      shortly
      > (only 2-3 minutes in length) the flight call, size, shape, short tail and
      > snow white undertail coverts pretty much eliminate everything else in my
      > mind. I'll send notes into the WBRC.Needless to say no photos could be
      taken
      > due to the quick movement and the height in the trees.
      >
      > All in all a great day.
      >
      > Scott Downes
      > downess@...
      > Yakima WA
      >
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