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Re: [BirdYak] sightings needed of newspaper

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  • Rich712@aol.com
    Denny, I was walking the Greenway again this morning with my daughter and made a point to check the Sarg Hubbard ponds and Buchanan Lake...no sign of the
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 24 5:03 PM
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      Denny,

      I was walking the Greenway again this morning with my daughter and made a
      point to check the Sarg Hubbard ponds and Buchanan Lake...no sign of the
      Sabine's Gull.

      Afterwards, I drove to the south end of the Greenway to bird the ponds by the
      Popoff Trail. The ponds by the parking lot held only a Pied-billed Grebe.
      However, the large pond just south of the sewage treatment plant had a lone
      Double-crested Cormorant and 30+ American Wigeon. As I was scanning/counting
      the wigeons, I thought I came across one resting in the overhanging branches
      of a Russian Olive-unusual behavior I didn't know they were capable of. A
      closer look revealed that perhaps they don't roost-it was a dozing male Wood
      Duck. Another 6-8 Wood Ducks were hiding in the tree shadows. A Belted
      Kingfisher also flew by this pond. Walking back, there were flocks of
      Starlings and Robins, a few N. Flickers and Black-capped Chickadees but the
      trees seemed to be alive with Yellow-rumped Warblers

      I an earlier post, I mentioned that I was at Sarg Hubbard Park with my sister
      on Saturday to see the Sabine's Gull-which we did. At one point, I was on
      the East ridge of the concert pond and my sister had walked out on the
      concrete deck getting such a close view of the gull that she remarked that
      the inside of it's mouth was as pink as ours. It flew at eye level between
      her and the shore. When the gull exited the pond a second time, we decided
      to walk to Buchanan Lake to seek the Western Grebe as she had never seen one
      before. As we started to cut across the grassy knoll through some small
      conifers, maples, and Mountain Ash trees, we spotted a small flock of Cedar
      Waxwings-mostly juveniles. Before we could get moving again Robins started
      bouncing around us in the grass, Starlings and Magpies were flying over, and
      three N. Flickers demanded that we watch their antics at the base of a tree.
      A Downey Woodpecker flashed red to draw our attention. I felt like Dorothy
      on the yellow brick road, we were on our way to see the wizard (uh, Western
      Grebe) but there were all these distractions. One small conifer burst to
      life with Black-capped Chickadees, Dark-eyed Juncos and Yellow-rumped
      Warblers. Dazed we made it to the asphalt pathway only to have the assault
      continue a few steps later when we were startled by the Sabine's Gull zipping
      over our heads on its way back to the concert pond. We thought about
      following it back but decided to press on for the grebe. Again, we were
      halted. This time by a hovering Belted Kingfisher who then dove into the
      river apparently snagging a small fish. About this time, we noticed two
      Great Blue Herons in the river not more than 20 meters (usually I say yards,
      but Andy sounds so scientific with metric notations...what the heck, I'm on a
      roll here) apart. Sure enough...Wham! One of the herons stabs the water,
      comes up, pauses for a second before throwing its head back and gulping some
      loser down. Off to see the wizard, we fight our way through views of
      Killdeer, Red-winged Blackbirds, and Mallards. About a third of the way up
      the lake, we find the grebe. In true wizard fashion, he has his head turned
      completely around and rested on his back. With the scope there is no doubt.
      Hustling back up the knoll, we skirt the marsh encountering a Song Sparrow,
      numerous White-crowned Sparrows and a swimming American Coot and a glimpse of
      a small diver-most likely a Pied-billed Grebe. Most likely, we passed House
      Sparrows and House Finches but they didn't register. It was one of the most
      species rich (20+) 20 minutes of birding of our lives-a beginner's paradise.
      And as a grand finale, we were able to watch the Sabine's Gull in graceful
      flight...similar to the Good Witch of the South. Or was it the East. No
      matter, this gull goes in all directions except the middle of Washington with
      a few notable exceptions.

      A friend told me last year that Andy had a list of Greenway species in one of
      their publications. Perhaps, you could put that total in the paper with an
      encouragement for beginner's to try the Greenway. It's a great place to
      start and to hone skills. Also, I thought Andy's posting of the 21st on the
      gull was a great recap of the Sabine's Gull. Edit the first and last
      sentence, and it is a great read. Loved the Kenn Kaufman quote!

      Later,
      Anxious old fat guy in a vest
    • Denny Granstrand
      Hi Yakkers, I need some more sightings to report for this week for the newspaper. If you have any, please e-mail them to BirdYak by early Monday evening.
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 21, 2001
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        Hi Yakkers,

        I need some more sightings to report for this week for the newspaper. If
        you have any, please e-mail them to BirdYak by early Monday evening.

        Thanks,

        Denny
        * * * * * * * * * * *
        * Denny Granstrand *
        * Yakima, WA *
        * osprey@... *
        * * * * * * * * * * *
      • AJBIRDS@aol.com
        I had a SHARP SHINNED HAWK visit my yard this morning, the first of the season. It managed to scatter the various AM. GOLDFINCHES, WHITE CROWNED SPARROWS,
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 21, 2001
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          I had a SHARP SHINNED HAWK  visit my yard this morning, the first of the season.
          It managed to scatter the various AM. GOLDFINCHES, WHITE CROWNED SPARROWS, DARK EYED JUNCOS, HOUSE FINCHES, AND RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS at my feeders.  I also have approximately 40/50 CALIFORNIA QUAIL, a few NORTHERN FLICKERS, several  MOURNING DOVES  and RING NECKED PHEASANTS, AM. KESTRELS, and a pair of DOWNY WOODPECKERS.  Late last night, I heard a GREAT HORNED OWL calling, followed by several loud squawks.

          Joyce Lucas
          Yakima, Wa
          ajbirds@...
        • Sturnella@aol.com
          Denny This may be out of the range but-I saw 4-5 Rough-legged Hawks along Hwy 395, close to where it meets Hwy 26 on the way to Spokane this last Sat. and
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 22, 2001
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            Denny
            This may be out of the range but-I saw 4-5 Rough-legged Hawks along Hwy 395,
            close to where it meets Hwy 26 on the way to Spokane this last Sat. and
            Sunday.
            Nothing real unusual for the yard-
            Debie
          • Sherrel Hailstone
            I know it isn t much, but I finally had some juncos at a platform feeder in my yard. Sherrel ... From: To: Sent:
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 22, 2001
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              I know it isn't much, but I finally had some juncos at a platform feeder in
              my yard.

              Sherrel
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <Sturnella@...>
              To: <BirdYak@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, October 22, 2001 8:33 AM
              Subject: Re: [BirdYak] sightings needed of newspaper


              Denny
              This may be out of the range but-I saw 4-5 Rough-legged Hawks along Hwy 395,
              close to where it meets Hwy 26 on the way to Spokane this last Sat. and
              Sunday.
              Nothing real unusual for the yard-
              Debie
            • Doris Robinson
              Hi Denny, In additons to the usual birds, we have a lot of fruit eaters, devouring the tiny ornamental crabapples. Many more Varied Thrushes, Robins galore,
              Message 6 of 13 , Oct 22, 2001
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                Hi Denny,
                In additons to the usual birds, we have a lot of fruit
                eaters, devouring the tiny ornamental crabapples. Many
                more Varied Thrushes, Robins galore, even saw a
                Northern Flicker eating elderberries with the others.
                Yesterday, Larry noiced a Hairy Woodpecker in the
                Locust grove, and this morning after our walk. we
                spied a White-headed woodpecker in a pine tree by the
                front gate. The chickadees are numerous also, and the
                goldfinches are having fun in the flower seeds left in
                the garden for them. Juncos everywhere, and the flock
                of quailnumbering 40-50 are around all day


                Larry and Doris Robinson
                Nile Valley
                --- Denny Granstrand <osprey@...> wrote:
                > Hi Yakkers,
                >
                > I need some more sightings to report for this week
                > for the newspaper. If
                > you have any, please e-mail them to BirdYak by early
                > Monday evening.
                >
                > Thanks,
                >
                > Denny
                > * * * * * * * * * * *
                > * Denny Granstrand *
                > * Yakima, WA *
                > * osprey@... *
                > * * * * * * * * * * *
                >
                >
                >
                >


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