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Ken's sightings.

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  • Deb Davis & Ken Bevis
    Denny: Better late than never. I saw a Cooper s hawk (possibly male goshawk) swoop through open forest canopy last Friday in the upper S. Fork Ahtanum Creek.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 27, 2001
      Denny:
      Better late than never.
      I saw a Cooper's hawk (possibly male goshawk) swoop through open forest
      canopy last Friday in the upper S. Fork Ahtanum Creek. Watched a
      courageous tree swallow repeatedly dive on a juvenile magpie that was
      strolling along beneath the swallow's active nest box. It was a tad
      comical. The magpie finally flew off.
      Kestrels are nesting in the planted snag at the WDFW Regional office on
      24th Ave in Yakima. We installed a snag on our demonstration wildlife
      habitat area (one with a large cavity and formerly nesting barn owls) that
      was cut down in the city cemetery last year. It is a large silver maple
      log, now upright, with a roof nailed on it. The kestrels have been sighted
      going in and out several times. It's pretty cool to see such a structure
      work. Demonstrates that dead tree cavities are likely a limiting resource
      for lots of species. Don't cut those old dead trees. Maybe topping isn't
      so bad after all if your intent is to kill or damage the tree and leave it
      for wildlife.
      A great horned owl pair successfully nested in the Lombardy poplars that
      lined the road just north of West Valley High School. Unfortunately,
      Yakima County roads felt the old trees with lots of rotten limbs and broken
      tops were a safety hazard so close to the busy road. After a call from a
      concerned neighbor, I (WDFW) located the owl nest, and requested they not
      fall four trees around the owls. The county agreed, and has further agreed
      to retain the 4 trees, but shorten them so they are no longer a hazard to
      the road, and install an owl nest box. It was excellent of Yakima County
      roads to do this. I was there a few days ago, and saw the female great
      horned owl again. She has only one eye! Amazing that she could survive.
      Under the nest tree were mostly rodent skulls (including lots of gray
      digger jaws and skulls, and gophers) and one female mallard butt, without
      the rest of the duck. Hopefully the owls will persist in the area. Let me
      know if you want to know more about that story.
      A Western Tanager in the upper Coleman Creek, north of Ellensburg, bathing
      in the creek.
      The herons at Selah are nearly ready to fall out of the nest.
      A friend saw some hoodlums throwing rocks at the Myron Lake Ospreys too.
      Little jerks.
      Nighthawks swooping low on the hill at Cowiche canyon. Saw them making
      their call.
      That's about all
      Ken Bevis.
      ----------
      > From: osprey@...
      > To: birdyak@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [BirdYak] bird sightings needed
      > Date: Monday, June 25, 2001 7:02 AM
      >
      > Hi Yakkers,
      >
      > I need some bird sighting reports to include in the bird alert for the
      > Yakima paper by this evening.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Denny
      > * * * * * * * * * * *
      > * Denny Granstrand *
      > * Yakima, WA *
      > * osprey@... *
      > * * * * * * * * * * *
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • BirdAHikes@aol.com
      I had two male Western Tanagers in my yard in Selah on Tuesday evening -- that was a first for my yard! Did a little (very little -- I was on a tour)
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 28, 2001
        I had two male Western Tanagers in my yard in Selah on Tuesday evening -- that was a first for my yard!

        Did a little (very little -- I was on a tour) birdwatching in England. Saw a Grey Heron, Chaffinch, Rooks, Robin (English), Blackbirds (a lot like our Robins), and Collared Doves (as well as the usual magpies, crows, ravens, House Sparrows, etc.). If I'd had the time and the wherewithal, I'd have liked to get out to do more birding but it's difficult in cities and on tours. Oh, also saw Shelducks wharfside in Lincoln. Saw some hawks but didn't have my binos with me at the time (on the bus from Oxford to Heathrow).

        Maia Kelly
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