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Grand Ronde Expedition - 1-3 June 2001

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  • Andy Stepniewski
    Birdyak and Tweeters, The following account is of a Yakima Valley Audubon Societ-sponsored trip to the extreme southeastern corner of Washington this past
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 6, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Birdyak and Tweeters,

      The following account is of a Yakima Valley Audubon Societ-sponsored trip to
      the extreme southeastern corner of Washington this past weekend.

      GRANDE RONDE EXPEDITION
      JUNE 1-3, 2001

      Eight Yakima Auduboners trekked to the far southeast corner of Washington
      this past weekend to experience the stunning Grande Ronde gorge country and
      the nearby high eastern Blue Mountains. Some of us moteled in Clarkston and
      drove up for the birding each morning. The rest camped at Field Springs
      State Park at the lower edge of the forest belt. We found this to be a
      surprisingly birdy site!

      Several of us (Andy and Ellen Stepniewski, Bob Wahl, and John Hebert)
      visited Kahlotus Lake out in the middle of the Columbia Basin en route to
      check out the White-faced Ibis, a rare wanderer to Washington. Numerous
      other waterbirds characteristic of the Columbia Basin lakes and marshes were
      seen at this wonderful birding spot. Some of us also hit the city park in
      Washtucna, a spot becoming known for the unusual. Here we found a shy
      American Redstart.

      The Grande Ronde region is a paradise for those who love arid, hot slopes
      and dramatic scenery. Doubtless, geologists and rockhounds would be very
      busy here. This part of Washington and adjacent Oregon is the source
      ("feeder dikes") for the immense Miocene basalt flows that cover the entire
      Columbia Basin. More recent uplift of the Blue and Wallowa Mountains has
      resulted in the carving one of the deepest gorges in North America (8,000')
      by the Snake River only a few miles to the south in Oregon The depth of the
      Snake and Grande River Canyons in Washington is only modestly less.
      Apparently, the ancestral course of both these rivers was maintained as
      uplift took place and they retained their course, downcutting through the
      thousands of feet of Columbia Plateau basalts (in Washington that is, other
      rocks outcrop to the south) in the landscape. Particularly dramatic were the
      incised meanders along the lower Grande Ronde River, good evidence of this
      streams "antecedent" nature.

      Stunning vistas of deep gorges and into three states was reason enough to
      visit this most remote corner of Washington. But, wait, we found more. An
      interesting flora and fauna exists on these rocky slopes and forested
      highlands. Elk, Mule Deer, Bighorn Sheep, and Black Bear are common, while
      raptors and other birds of the cliffs are attractions, as well as a diverse
      breeding-season avifauna in the riparian-lined drainages. Higher slopes of
      the Blues are mantled with a picturesque mosaic of forested terrain,
      seemingly never far from a rocky escarpment or gorge. These forests are
      special in that some of the fauna has close affinities with Rocky Mountain
      forms. Examples are Gray Jay and Golden-mantled Squirrel; these are more
      similar to those in the Rockies of Colorado than to races occurring in other
      parts of Washington.

      As birders, we found much of interest here, too. It may be the Golden Eagle
      capital of Washington; we saw at least five of these regal birds soaring and
      hunting high overhead. If we had come in winter, we would have seen a number
      of Bald Eagles, too. Birds of the cliffs and rocky slopes were well
      represented, also, as were those of the riparian habitats, especially along
      feeder streams to the main rivers. Our visit was timed at the height of the
      breeding season, so these lush corridors were hosting many Neo-tropical
      breeders.

      Saturday morning dawned cool and breezy, so we descended from Field Springs
      deep down into the Grande Ronde River. Here was scenery on a grand scale.
      Along the road as we reached lower elevations, we found Red-eyed Vireo to be
      surprisingly common in the dense, but narrow White Alder riparian along
      Rattlesnake Creek, flanked by "desert" terrain. Warbling Vireo and Yellow
      Warbler were also common. Everywhere in this region in brush patches on the
      dry rocky slopes, the strident song of Lazuli Bunting was heard, even at
      mid-day. At the river the Grande Ronde River Road, we went right (west) to
      Cougar Creek Road. We walked this road, checking the riparian habitats along
      the creek. Red-eyed Vireo was also present along lower stretches of this
      road in the riparian. A number of migrants were noted here, including Vaux's
      Swift, flycatchers, apparently concentrating in the lowest and warmest parts
      of the region because of the inclement weather. Great views of an obliging
      Yellow-breasted Chat were enjoyed here, too. Saturday morning was a good one
      for mammals; we saw Elk, Mule Deer, Mountain Sheep, and a Black Bear. We
      watched the bear charge a Mule Deer twice; it was apparently a healthy deer,
      so the bear soon figured this wasn't going to work. Larry and Doris Robinson
      kindly agreed to haul a big pile of firewood left from a hunter's camp back
      up to camp for the comfort of the campers in the group. Thanks Larry and
      Doris, we had a toasty fire that night!

      We visited the Grande Ronde yet again by descending Schumaker Road, which is
      even more dramatic, descending 3,000' in about four miles - going from moist
      warbler-filled ravines to hot, dry slopes where relict groves of Hackberry
      (Celtis reticulata) is the conspicuous tree. At the end of the road, at a
      curious tunnel blasted through the cliff at river level, we spied on a band
      of Mountain Sheep. We watched as these sturdy animals bolted up seemingly
      vertical slopes, even the pint-sized lamb! Here were yet more Golden Eagles.
      Here was the only spot during the weekend one could truly call warm. After
      lunch, it was naptime.

      Back at Field Springs State Park, we birded the open forests of Douglas-fir,
      Grand Fir, Ponderosa Pine, and Western Larch (with a few Western Yew and Red
      Cedar). This was a great place to relax and study many birds. We found
      Ruffed Grouse, Great Horned Owl, Rufous Hummingbird, Williamson's Sapsucker,
      Hairy, White-headed (uncommon in these mountains), and Pileated Woodpeckers,
      Northern Flicker, Western Wood-Pewee, Hammond's, Dusky, and Pacific-slope
      Flycatchers, Mountain and Chestnut-backed Chickadee, all 3 nuthatches, Brown
      Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Swainson's and Hermit Thrushes, Cassin's
      Vireo, Orange-crowned, Yellow, Yellow-rumped, Townsend's, and MacGillivray's
      Warblers, Townsend's Warbler, Western Tanager, Lazuli Bunting, Chipping
      Sparrow, and Cassin's Finch.Western and Mountain Bluebirds. were conspicuous
      in the surrounding fields.

      In the afternoon, we hiked the mile-long trail to Puffer Butte, an old
      volcano, which gives spectacular view into three states and the Grande Ronde
      River far below. From the broad, forested summit, we hiked south on a rocky
      trail into the steppe vegetation below. This habitat was notable for its
      many colorful wildlowers. Bird diversity was not high in this habitat; we
      did find Gray Partridge, and Vesper and Lark Sparrows. Meanwhile, Gus and
      Mary Pooler had yet another face-to-face encounter with a large Black Bear.
      This beast even stood up on its hind legs to get its bearings, then charged
      away!

      Sunday we headed home via the high eastern Blue Mountains. At the Wenatchee
      Guard Station, situated on a spectacular ridge crest. To the north were
      forested slopes on north-facing aspects. To the south is an abrupt, rocky
      escarpment dropping off thousands of feet towards the Grande Ronde River.
      Here we spent some time searching for Green-tailed Towhee; this area was
      where this species was 1st noted breeding in Washington, in the ravines
      south of the ridge near the guard station. Recent records are few from this
      site, probably because the towhee has been discovered in more accessible
      sites since. Some of the northernmost Mountain Mahogany (Cercocarpus
      ledifolius), a grayish-hued gnarled tree or tall shrub common on Great Basin
      mountainsides to the south occur along the rocky ridges here. Further on,
      we stopped at Misery Spring Campground. Here, at 6,200', the trees were
      Subalpine Fir, Engelmann Spruce, and Western Larch. Ruby-crowned Kinglet was
      abundant. We also found Hermit and Varied Thrushes, Winter Wren, Townsend's
      Warbler, and Fox Sparrow. The meadow here was carpeted with Biscuit Root
      (Lomatium triternatum) in full bloom; I have never encountered as dense a c
      arpet of Lomatium before.

      Sunset Point afforded spectacular views of the upper Tucannon River basin.
      Although not in officially designated wilderness, there was no sign of
      humankind in the basin below, a rare sight nowadays. This is a marvelous
      place!

      From there, we continued to Umatilla Campground just within the Umatilla
      National Forest. Ponderosa Pine dominated the forest here. We looked for
      White-headed Woodpecker with no luck. We noted Pygmy Nuthatch, Yellow-rumped
      Warbler, and Cassin's Finch here, though. It was cold as we lunched, so
      everyone except Ellen, Bob, and myself headed directly home. We kept up the
      pace, encircling the Blues, not adding any birds to the trip list except
      Green-tailed Towhee on Biscuit Ridge, where we also had a memorable view all
      the way to Mt. Adams and Mt. Rainier.

      Bird species noted:

      K - Kahlotus
      W - Washtucna
      P - Palouse Falls
      F - Field Springs State Park
      G - Grande Ronde River
      B - High Blue Mountains

      Eared Grebe - K
      White-faced Ibis - 4, K
      Canada Goose - G
      Mallard
      Blue-winged Teal - K, W
      Cinnamon Teal - K, W
      Northern Shoveler - K, W
      Gadwall - K, W
      Common Merganser - G
      Ruddy Duck - W
      Osprey - on Snake River west of Clarkston
      Northern Harrier - F
      Red-tailed Hawk - K, W, G, F, B
      Golden Eagle - 5, G, magnificent!
      American Kestrel - K, G, F
      Gray Partridge - F
      Chukar - G
      Ring-necked Pheasant - G
      Ruffed Grouse - F
      Wild Turkey - F
      California Quail - W
      American Coot - K, W
      Killdeer - K
      Black-necked Stilt - K
      American Avocet - K
      Spotted Sandpiper - K, G
      Wilson's Phalarope - Ring-billed Gull - K
      Rock Dove - K, W, G
      Mourning Dove - K, W, F, G
      Barn Owl - I-82 at Prosser!
      Great Horned Owl - F
      Common Nighthawk - F
      Vaux's Swift - G, many cruising about cliffs in cool of morning, presumably
      from higher forests
      White-throated Swift - P, none in G
      Rufous Hummingbird - F
      Belted Kingfisher - G
      Williamson's Sapsucker - F, a constantly drumming male right in camp. Also B
      Hairy Woodpecker - B
      White-headed Woodpecker - F
      Northern Flicker - W, G, F, B
      Pileated Woodpecker - F
      Olive-sided Flycatcher - F
      Western Wood-Pewee - W, F, G
      Willow Flycatcher - F
      Hammond's Flycatcher - F, B
      Dusky Flycatcher - F, G
      Pacific-slope Flycatcher - F
      Say's Phoebe - K, W
      Western Kingbird, K, W, G
      Eastern Kingbird - K
      Horned Lark - F
      Violet-green Swallow - G
      Cliff Swallow - K, W, G, huge colony of many hundreds on the Grande Ronde
      River with many engaged in nest building with mud from the riverside!
      Steller's Jay - F, B
      Black-billed Magpie - K, W, G
      American Crow - G
      Common Raven - W, F, G, B
      Black-capped Chickadee - G
      Mountain Chickadee - F, B
      Chestnut-backed Chickadee - F
      Red-breasted Nuthatch - F, B
      Pygmy Nuthatch - F
      Brown Creeper - F
      Rock Wren - K, W, G
      Canyon Wren - G
      House Wren - K, W, F
      Winter Wren - B
      Marsh Wren - W
      Golden-crowned Kinglet - F, B
      Ruby-crowned Kinglet - B, very common in higher forests
      Western Bluebird - F
      Mountain Bluebird - F
      Swainson's Thrush - F
      Hermit Thrush - F
      American Robin - F, B
      Varied Thrush - B
      Cedar Waxwing - G
      European Starling - K, W, F, G
      Cassin's Vireo - F
      Warbling Vireo - F, G, B
      Red-eyed Vireo - G, common in White Alders along feeder creeks!
      Orange-crowned Warbler - F
      Nashville Warbler - F
      Yellow Warbler - F, G
      Yellow-rumped Warbler - F, B
      Townsend's Warbler - F, B
      American Redstart - 1 1st-year male at W
      MacGillivray's Warbler - F
      Yellow-breasted Chat - G
      Western Tanager - F, B
      Black-headed Grosbeak - F, G
      Lazuli Bunting - F, G, abundant at lower elevations!
      Spotted Towhee - G
      Green-tailed Towhee - 2 on "post-trip extension" to Biscuit Ridge
      Chipping Sparrow - F, B
      Vesper Sparrow - P, F
      Lark Sparrow - F, steppe/pine edge on Puffer Butte hike
      Fox Sparrow - B, meadow edge at Mountain Misery Campground
      Song Sparrow - W, F, G
      Dark-eyed Junco - F, B
      Red-winged Blackbird - K, W
      Western Meadowlark - K, W, P, F
      Yellow-headed Blackbird - K, W
      Brewer's Blackbird - K, W, P, F, G
      Brown-headed Cowbird - G
      Bullock's Oriole - K, G
      Cassin's Finch - F, B
      House Finch - W, P, G
      Red Crossbill - F
      Pine Siskin - F, B
      American Goldfinch - W, P, F, G
      Evening Grosbeak - F
      House Sparrow - Dayton mini-mart!

      Mammals of note:

      Elk - G
      Mule Deer - F, G, B
      Bighorn Sheep - G
      Black Bear - 1 in G, 1 at F

      Andy Stepniewski
      Wapato WA
      Steppie@...
    • S Ray
      Andy, I was hoping you d find Yellow-billed Cuckoo. Sounds like you had a good time. Scott ... From: Andy Stepniewski [mailto:steppie@nwinfo.net] Sent:
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 6, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Andy,

        I was hoping you'd find Yellow-billed Cuckoo.

        Sounds like you had a good time.

        Scott


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Andy Stepniewski [mailto:steppie@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, June 06, 2001 3:49 PM
        To: BIRDYAK
        Cc: TWEETERS
        Subject: [BirdYak] Grand Ronde Expedition - 1-3 June 2001

        Birdyak and Tweeters,

        The following account is of a Yakima Valley Audubon Societ-sponsored trip to
        the extreme southeastern corner of Washington this past weekend.

        GRANDE RONDE EXPEDITION
        JUNE 1-3, 2001

        Eight Yakima Auduboners trekked to the far southeast corner of Washington
        this past weekend to experience the stunning Grande Ronde gorge country and
        the nearby high eastern Blue Mountains. Some of us moteled in Clarkston and
        drove up for the birding each morning. The rest camped at Field Springs
        State Park at the lower edge of the forest belt. We found this to be a
        surprisingly birdy site!

        Several of us (Andy and Ellen Stepniewski, Bob Wahl, and John Hebert)
        visited Kahlotus Lake out in the middle of the Columbia Basin en route to
        check out the White-faced Ibis, a rare wanderer to Washington. Numerous
        other waterbirds characteristic of the Columbia Basin lakes and marshes were
        seen at this wonderful birding spot. Some of us also hit the city park in
        Washtucna, a spot becoming known for the unusual. Here we found a shy
        American Redstart.

        The Grande Ronde region is a paradise for those who love arid, hot slopes
        and dramatic scenery. Doubtless, geologists and rockhounds would be very
        busy here. This part of Washington and adjacent Oregon is the source
        ("feeder dikes") for the immense Miocene basalt flows that cover the entire
        Columbia Basin. More recent uplift of the Blue and Wallowa Mountains has
        resulted in the carving one of the deepest gorges in North America (8,000')
        by the Snake River only a few miles to the south in Oregon The depth of the
        Snake and Grande River Canyons in Washington is only modestly less.
        Apparently, the ancestral course of both these rivers was maintained as
        uplift took place and they retained their course, downcutting through the
        thousands of feet of Columbia Plateau basalts (in Washington that is, other
        rocks outcrop to the south) in the landscape. Particularly dramatic were the
        incised meanders along the lower Grande Ronde River, good evidence of this
        streams "antecedent" nature.

        Stunning vistas of deep gorges and into three states was reason enough to
        visit this most remote corner of Washington. But, wait, we found more. An
        interesting flora and fauna exists on these rocky slopes and forested
        highlands. Elk, Mule Deer, Bighorn Sheep, and Black Bear are common, while
        raptors and other birds of the cliffs are attractions, as well as a diverse
        breeding-season avifauna in the riparian-lined drainages. Higher slopes of
        the Blues are mantled with a picturesque mosaic of forested terrain,
        seemingly never far from a rocky escarpment or gorge. These forests are
        special in that some of the fauna has close affinities with Rocky Mountain
        forms. Examples are Gray Jay and Golden-mantled Squirrel; these are more
        similar to those in the Rockies of Colorado than to races occurring in other
        parts of Washington.

        As birders, we found much of interest here, too. It may be the Golden Eagle
        capital of Washington; we saw at least five of these regal birds soaring and
        hunting high overhead. If we had come in winter, we would have seen a number
        of Bald Eagles, too. Birds of the cliffs and rocky slopes were well
        represented, also, as were those of the riparian habitats, especially along
        feeder streams to the main rivers. Our visit was timed at the height of the
        breeding season, so these lush corridors were hosting many Neo-tropical
        breeders.

        Saturday morning dawned cool and breezy, so we descended from Field Springs
        deep down into the Grande Ronde River. Here was scenery on a grand scale.
        Along the road as we reached lower elevations, we found Red-eyed Vireo to be
        surprisingly common in the dense, but narrow White Alder riparian along
        Rattlesnake Creek, flanked by "desert" terrain. Warbling Vireo and Yellow
        Warbler were also common. Everywhere in this region in brush patches on the
        dry rocky slopes, the strident song of Lazuli Bunting was heard, even at
        mid-day. At the river the Grande Ronde River Road, we went right (west) to
        Cougar Creek Road. We walked this road, checking the riparian habitats along
        the creek. Red-eyed Vireo was also present along lower stretches of this
        road in the riparian. A number of migrants were noted here, including Vaux's
        Swift, flycatchers, apparently concentrating in the lowest and warmest parts
        of the region because of the inclement weather. Great views of an obliging
        Yellow-breasted Chat were enjoyed here, too. Saturday morning was a good one
        for mammals; we saw Elk, Mule Deer, Mountain Sheep, and a Black Bear. We
        watched the bear charge a Mule Deer twice; it was apparently a healthy deer,
        so the bear soon figured this wasn't going to work. Larry and Doris Robinson
        kindly agreed to haul a big pile of firewood left from a hunter's camp back
        up to camp for the comfort of the campers in the group. Thanks Larry and
        Doris, we had a toasty fire that night!

        We visited the Grande Ronde yet again by descending Schumaker Road, which is
        even more dramatic, descending 3,000' in about four miles - going from moist
        warbler-filled ravines to hot, dry slopes where relict groves of Hackberry
        (Celtis reticulata) is the conspicuous tree. At the end of the road, at a
        curious tunnel blasted through the cliff at river level, we spied on a band
        of Mountain Sheep. We watched as these sturdy animals bolted up seemingly
        vertical slopes, even the pint-sized lamb! Here were yet more Golden Eagles.
        Here was the only spot during the weekend one could truly call warm. After
        lunch, it was naptime.

        Back at Field Springs State Park, we birded the open forests of Douglas-fir,
        Grand Fir, Ponderosa Pine, and Western Larch (with a few Western Yew and Red
        Cedar). This was a great place to relax and study many birds. We found
        Ruffed Grouse, Great Horned Owl, Rufous Hummingbird, Williamson's Sapsucker,
        Hairy, White-headed (uncommon in these mountains), and Pileated Woodpeckers,
        Northern Flicker, Western Wood-Pewee, Hammond's, Dusky, and Pacific-slope
        Flycatchers, Mountain and Chestnut-backed Chickadee, all 3 nuthatches, Brown
        Creeper, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Swainson's and Hermit Thrushes, Cassin's
        Vireo, Orange-crowned, Yellow, Yellow-rumped, Townsend's, and MacGillivray's
        Warblers, Townsend's Warbler, Western Tanager, Lazuli Bunting, Chipping
        Sparrow, and Cassin's Finch.Western and Mountain Bluebirds. were conspicuous
        in the surrounding fields.

        In the afternoon, we hiked the mile-long trail to Puffer Butte, an old
        volcano, which gives spectacular view into three states and the Grande Ronde
        River far below. From the broad, forested summit, we hiked south on a rocky
        trail into the steppe vegetation below. This habitat was notable for its
        many colorful wildlowers. Bird diversity was not high in this habitat; we
        did find Gray Partridge, and Vesper and Lark Sparrows. Meanwhile, Gus and
        Mary Pooler had yet another face-to-face encounter with a large Black Bear.
        This beast even stood up on its hind legs to get its bearings, then charged
        away!

        Sunday we headed home via the high eastern Blue Mountains. At the Wenatchee
        Guard Station, situated on a spectacular ridge crest. To the north were
        forested slopes on north-facing aspects. To the south is an abrupt, rocky
        escarpment dropping off thousands of feet towards the Grande Ronde River.
        Here we spent some time searching for Green-tailed Towhee; this area was
        where this species was 1st noted breeding in Washington, in the ravines
        south of the ridge near the guard station. Recent records are few from this
        site, probably because the towhee has been discovered in more accessible
        sites since. Some of the northernmost Mountain Mahogany (Cercocarpus
        ledifolius), a grayish-hued gnarled tree or tall shrub common on Great Basin
        mountainsides to the south occur along the rocky ridges here. Further on,
        we stopped at Misery Spring Campground. Here, at 6,200', the trees were
        Subalpine Fir, Engelmann Spruce, and Western Larch. Ruby-crowned Kinglet was
        abundant. We also found Hermit and Varied Thrushes, Winter Wren, Townsend's
        Warbler, and Fox Sparrow. The meadow here was carpeted with Biscuit Root
        (Lomatium triternatum) in full bloom; I have never encountered as dense a c
        arpet of Lomatium before.

        Sunset Point afforded spectacular views of the upper Tucannon River basin.
        Although not in officially designated wilderness, there was no sign of
        humankind in the basin below, a rare sight nowadays. This is a marvelous
        place!

        >From there, we continued to Umatilla Campground just within the Umatilla
        National Forest. Ponderosa Pine dominated the forest here. We looked for
        White-headed Woodpecker with no luck. We noted Pygmy Nuthatch, Yellow-rumped
        Warbler, and Cassin's Finch here, though. It was cold as we lunched, so
        everyone except Ellen, Bob, and myself headed directly home. We kept up the
        pace, encircling the Blues, not adding any birds to the trip list except
        Green-tailed Towhee on Biscuit Ridge, where we also had a memorable view all
        the way to Mt. Adams and Mt. Rainier.

        Bird species noted:

        K - Kahlotus
        W - Washtucna
        P - Palouse Falls
        F - Field Springs State Park
        G - Grande Ronde River
        B - High Blue Mountains

        Eared Grebe - K
        White-faced Ibis - 4, K
        Canada Goose - G
        Mallard
        Blue-winged Teal - K, W
        Cinnamon Teal - K, W
        Northern Shoveler - K, W
        Gadwall - K, W
        Common Merganser - G
        Ruddy Duck - W
        Osprey - on Snake River west of Clarkston
        Northern Harrier - F
        Red-tailed Hawk - K, W, G, F, B
        Golden Eagle - 5, G, magnificent!
        American Kestrel - K, G, F
        Gray Partridge - F
        Chukar - G
        Ring-necked Pheasant - G
        Ruffed Grouse - F
        Wild Turkey - F
        California Quail - W
        American Coot - K, W
        Killdeer - K
        Black-necked Stilt - K
        American Avocet - K
        Spotted Sandpiper - K, G
        Wilson's Phalarope - Ring-billed Gull - K
        Rock Dove - K, W, G
        Mourning Dove - K, W, F, G
        Barn Owl - I-82 at Prosser!
        Great Horned Owl - F
        Common Nighthawk - F
        Vaux's Swift - G, many cruising about cliffs in cool of morning, presumably
        from higher forests
        White-throated Swift - P, none in G
        Rufous Hummingbird - F
        Belted Kingfisher - G
        Williamson's Sapsucker - F, a constantly drumming male right in camp. Also B
        Hairy Woodpecker - B
        White-headed Woodpecker - F
        Northern Flicker - W, G, F, B
        Pileated Woodpecker - F
        Olive-sided Flycatcher - F
        Western Wood-Pewee - W, F, G
        Willow Flycatcher - F
        Hammond's Flycatcher - F, B
        Dusky Flycatcher - F, G
        Pacific-slope Flycatcher - F
        Say's Phoebe - K, W
        Western Kingbird, K, W, G
        Eastern Kingbird - K
        Horned Lark - F
        Violet-green Swallow - G
        Cliff Swallow - K, W, G, huge colony of many hundreds on the Grande Ronde
        River with many engaged in nest building with mud from the riverside!
        Steller's Jay - F, B
        Black-billed Magpie - K, W, G
        American Crow - G
        Common Raven - W, F, G, B
        Black-capped Chickadee - G
        Mountain Chickadee - F, B
        Chestnut-backed Chickadee - F
        Red-breasted Nuthatch - F, B
        Pygmy Nuthatch - F
        Brown Creeper - F
        Rock Wren - K, W, G
        Canyon Wren - G
        House Wren - K, W, F
        Winter Wren - B
        Marsh Wren - W
        Golden-crowned Kinglet - F, B
        Ruby-crowned Kinglet - B, very common in higher forests
        Western Bluebird - F
        Mountain Bluebird - F
        Swainson's Thrush - F
        Hermit Thrush - F
        American Robin - F, B
        Varied Thrush - B
        Cedar Waxwing - G
        European Starling - K, W, F, G
        Cassin's Vireo - F
        Warbling Vireo - F, G, B
        Red-eyed Vireo - G, common in White Alders along feeder creeks!
        Orange-crowned Warbler - F
        Nashville Warbler - F
        Yellow Warbler - F, G
        Yellow-rumped Warbler - F, B
        Townsend's Warbler - F, B
        American Redstart - 1 1st-year male at W
        MacGillivray's Warbler - F
        Yellow-breasted Chat - G
        Western Tanager - F, B
        Black-headed Grosbeak - F, G
        Lazuli Bunting - F, G, abundant at lower elevations!
        Spotted Towhee - G
        Green-tailed Towhee - 2 on "post-trip extension" to Biscuit Ridge
        Chipping Sparrow - F, B
        Vesper Sparrow - P, F
        Lark Sparrow - F, steppe/pine edge on Puffer Butte hike
        Fox Sparrow - B, meadow edge at Mountain Misery Campground
        Song Sparrow - W, F, G
        Dark-eyed Junco - F, B
        Red-winged Blackbird - K, W
        Western Meadowlark - K, W, P, F
        Yellow-headed Blackbird - K, W
        Brewer's Blackbird - K, W, P, F, G
        Brown-headed Cowbird - G
        Bullock's Oriole - K, G
        Cassin's Finch - F, B
        House Finch - W, P, G
        Red Crossbill - F
        Pine Siskin - F, B
        American Goldfinch - W, P, F, G
        Evening Grosbeak - F
        House Sparrow - Dayton mini-mart!

        Mammals of note:

        Elk - G
        Mule Deer - F, G, B
        Bighorn Sheep - G
        Black Bear - 1 in G, 1 at F

        Andy Stepniewski
        Wapato WA
        Steppie@...








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