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Ferruginous Hawk-30 March

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  • Andy Stepniewski
    Yakkers, While on a hike to the crest of Rattlesnake Ridge (due north of Wapato WA) about 5 PM on March 30, an adult Ferruginous Hawk flew by me. I happened to
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 3, 2001
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      Yakkers,

      While on a hike to the crest of Rattlesnake Ridge (due north of Wapato WA)
      about 5 PM on March 30, an adult Ferruginous Hawk flew by me. I happened to
      be sitting in the Bluebunch Wheatgrass grassland on the north slope atop the
      peak known locally as "Ladybug Peak," near the radio-towers, when the hawk
      went by. It was my 1st sighting of this species from this peak in my 23
      years of visiting this area, though Debie Brown has noted them occasionally
      just to the east.

      As a bonus, I had chanced upon a new Lomatium hidden away in the bunchgrass,
      a species I'll have to let the botany people help me with when they visit
      the area April 14.

      In discussion with others who are aware of the Ferruginous Hawks plight in
      Washington, it seems the state has perhaps ~ 30 pairs of this regal bird.
      Each year sees less, we feel, primarily due to the tremendous regional
      decline of both White-tailed and Black-tailed Jackrabbits and Townsend's
      Ground Squirrels. Indeed, the ground squirrel has become rare, only isolated
      remnant colonies remain. East of the Columbia River, the closely related
      Washington Ground Squirrel is in a similar steep decline.

      Andy Stepniewski
      Wapato WA
      steppie@...
    • SR
      Townsend s Ground Squirrels have become quite a problem around our place. They dig into any soft soil they can find. There are probably several hundred within
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 4, 2001
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        Townsend's Ground Squirrels have become quite a problem around our place.
        They dig into any soft soil they can find. There are probably several
        hundred within 2000 feet of our place. I didn't know they were so rare and
        will try to be more tolerant.

        Scott

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Andy Stepniewski [mailto:steppie@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2001 3:13 AM
        To: BIRDYAK
        Subject: [BirdYak] Ferruginous Hawk-30 March


        Yakkers,

        While on a hike to the crest of Rattlesnake Ridge (due north of Wapato WA)
        about 5 PM on March 30, an adult Ferruginous Hawk flew by me. I happened to
        be sitting in the Bluebunch Wheatgrass grassland on the north slope atop the
        peak known locally as "Ladybug Peak," near the radio-towers, when the hawk
        went by. It was my 1st sighting of this species from this peak in my 23
        years of visiting this area, though Debie Brown has noted them occasionally
        just to the east.

        As a bonus, I had chanced upon a new Lomatium hidden away in the bunchgrass,
        a species I'll have to let the botany people help me with when they visit
        the area April 14.

        In discussion with others who are aware of the Ferruginous Hawks plight in
        Washington, it seems the state has perhaps ~ 30 pairs of this regal bird.
        Each year sees less, we feel, primarily due to the tremendous regional
        decline of both White-tailed and Black-tailed Jackrabbits and Townsend's
        Ground Squirrels. Indeed, the ground squirrel has become rare, only isolated
        remnant colonies remain. East of the Columbia River, the closely related
        Washington Ground Squirrel is in a similar steep decline.

        Andy Stepniewski
        Wapato WA
        steppie@...






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      • Andy Stepniewski
        Scott, ANY colonies still persisting are of great interest; this species will soon be on the Threatened WA list. Andy ... From: SR To:
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 5, 2001
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          Scott,

          ANY colonies still persisting are of great interest; this species will soon
          be on the Threatened WA list.

          Andy
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: SR <scray@...>
          To: <birdyak@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2001 10:50 PM
          Subject: RE: [BirdYak] Ferruginous Hawk-30 March


          > Townsend's Ground Squirrels have become quite a problem around our place.
          > They dig into any soft soil they can find. There are probably several
          > hundred within 2000 feet of our place. I didn't know they were so rare
          and
          > will try to be more tolerant.
          >
          > Scott
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Andy Stepniewski [mailto:steppie@...]
          > Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2001 3:13 AM
          > To: BIRDYAK
          > Subject: [BirdYak] Ferruginous Hawk-30 March
          >
          >
          > Yakkers,
          >
          > While on a hike to the crest of Rattlesnake Ridge (due north of Wapato WA)
          > about 5 PM on March 30, an adult Ferruginous Hawk flew by me. I happened
          to
          > be sitting in the Bluebunch Wheatgrass grassland on the north slope atop
          the
          > peak known locally as "Ladybug Peak," near the radio-towers, when the hawk
          > went by. It was my 1st sighting of this species from this peak in my 23
          > years of visiting this area, though Debie Brown has noted them
          occasionally
          > just to the east.
          >
          > As a bonus, I had chanced upon a new Lomatium hidden away in the
          bunchgrass,
          > a species I'll have to let the botany people help me with when they visit
          > the area April 14.
          >
          > In discussion with others who are aware of the Ferruginous Hawks plight in
          > Washington, it seems the state has perhaps ~ 30 pairs of this regal bird.
          > Each year sees less, we feel, primarily due to the tremendous regional
          > decline of both White-tailed and Black-tailed Jackrabbits and Townsend's
          > Ground Squirrels. Indeed, the ground squirrel has become rare, only
          isolated
          > remnant colonies remain. East of the Columbia River, the closely related
          > Washington Ground Squirrel is in a similar steep decline.
          >
          > Andy Stepniewski
          > Wapato WA
          > steppie@...
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > birdyak-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > birdyak-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
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