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2738RE: Suet Science

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  • ken@wildlanders.com
    Nov 5, 2004
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      Debie and others,

      Would like to know if you (or any others here) have used the kidney fat from your
      cattle for bird suet? In particular, I am looking for confirmation that the kidney suet
      is softer than the traditional corporate USDA inspected beef suet. At about 75F the
      fed lot (USDA) sources will be hard while the free range sources (aka, your cattle)
      will be firm but not hard (not as soft as butter at room temperature but not as hard
      as butter in the fridge either). Somewhere in between. Free pasture/range should
      also be a bit yellower from the grass diet (vs grain, silage, and animal blood and
      bone meal diets which tend to be whiter). I am looking to confirm that too. I have
      checked with many sources now and we are finding that the free grass/pasture beef
      (those raised on a small farm and not force fed controlled diets through the fed lots)
      have softer fat tissues. I would like to confirm that with as many sources as
      possible.

      As for a source of natural suet, yes, send me a message privately. And anyone else
      too that raises cattle on a smaller scale. I am staying away from the corporate beef
      where we had the mad cow problems. I am staying with the small farms where the
      beef is more isolated from the large corporate cattle issues, supplemented with
      whole grain rather than force fed rotted silage, no hormones, and no animal based
      feeds (blood and bone meal). In essence, I am looking for animals that have led a
      good wholesome life on free range or large pasture without confinement or
      mistreatment in fed lots. Better for the cows and better for the birds.


      Ken
      ken@...




      > We have raised beef for several years on a small farm.
      > What information are you looking for?
      > Do you need a source for natural suet?
      > Debie Brown
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      > Message: 2
      > Date: Thu, 04 Nov 2004 13:08:39 -0800
      > From: ken@...
      > Subject: Re: Digest Number 1005
      >
      > Acid scarification helps break the dormancy of some native plant seeds. In
      essence,
      > it naturally has to the go through a digestive system. The main seed and embryo
      > have evolved to survive the digestive systems of animals including birds. This is
      > common in berries. Birds are a natural transport system for native plants. Much
      like
      > pollen in bees.
      >
      > An example is the human sludge buried in soil after treatment. They used to do
      this
      > up in the Omak area where we picked baby's breath in the summer back in the
      70's.
      > The sludge was buried in rows and covered with bark. The baby's breath grew
      > adjacent to those rows where there was moisture. But what was amazing was that
      > you would find tomatoes, squash and other plants growing out in the desert where
      > they buried the sludge. (the bark covering helped retain the moisture during the
      heat
      > of summer).
      >
      > In regards to the the smooth sumac, the birds eat it, carry it a distance, then poop
      it
      > out elsewhere. Since it has gone through the digestive system, it has received its
      > natural acid scarification that breaks the dormancy. The seed is still alive and then
      > begins to grow. In any event, smooth sumac probably will not grow so well directly
      > under feeder.
      >
      > I own a native plant business and supply seed to some of the largest native plant
      > nurseries in the northwest. And the wild bird suet is an extension of that business.
      >
      > -Ken
      >
      >
      > > Nice idea - native plant seeds. They will at least start growing under the
      > > feeder. hehe
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      Kenneth J. Boettger, Owner and General Manager
      Alpine WildSeed
      http://www.wildlanders.com/members/aws
      All Green Thumbs
      http://www.wildlanders.com/wildlanders/aaaasp/agt/agt.asp
      bimonthly: Native Plants & Wildlife, The PNW and the Inland Empire
      http://www.wildlanders.com/wildlanders/aaaasp/home/newsletter.asp
      ken@...
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