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stuck seat post

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  • Charlie
    Hey folks: This week in the middle of a ride my bolt holding my seat to my seat post broke. After riding home (8.5miles) standing up I decided to fix the
    Message 1 of 5 , May 1, 2004
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      Hey folks: This week in the middle of a ride my bolt holding my
      seat to my seat post broke. After riding home (8.5miles) standing
      up I decided to fix the problem. Tried different bolts, clamps
      etc. Nothing seemed to work well with the existing post. I think
      the grooves in the original clamp were somewhat worn. I then tried
      to remove the post. No way. Wouldn't budge. This is my main
      commuter bike with lots of miles, snow , salt etc.. I guess the post
      (kalloy) 'rusted' to the cro-mo frame. Doesn't look rusty tho'. I
      then put a pipe(yes pipe) wrench to the post and oiled the post.
      After 2 days of this I have freed the post but can't remove it. It
      spins with lots of force but does not come up and out. Should I
      drill the post, put something through it and tap up? I'm almost
      ready for the LBS, but not quite. OR is it time for a new bike.
      Charlie
    • Michael Plakus
      I think you re on the right track with your tap up idea. Better get it fixed quick, as of this morning I have widened the gap to over a century again.
      Message 2 of 5 , May 1, 2004
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        I think you’re on the right track with your “tap up” idea.  Better get it fixed quick, as of this morning I have widened the gap to over a century again.  Muirkirk Rd didn’t look that bad though (did it in the reverse of what you described as part of a tour of three suburbs—Landover Hills to Laurel to Bowie).

         

        Michael Plakus

        mailto:mplakus@...

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Charlie [mailto:chalfredm@...]
        Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 10:43 AM
        To: BikeWashingtonDC@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [BikeWashingtonDC] stuck seat post

         

        Hey folks:  This week in the middle of a ride my bolt holding my
        seat to my seat post broke.  After riding home (8.5miles) standing
        up I decided to fix the problem.  Tried different bolts, clamps
        etc.  Nothing seemed to work well with the existing post.  I think
        the grooves in the original clamp were somewhat worn.   I then tried
        to remove the post.  No way.  Wouldn't budge.  This is my main
        commuter bike with lots of miles, snow , salt etc..  I guess the post
        (kalloy) 'rusted' to the cro-mo frame.  Doesn't look rusty tho'.  I
        then put a pipe(yes pipe) wrench to the post and oiled the post. 
        After 2 days of this I have freed the post but can't remove it.  It
        spins with lots of force but does not come up and out.  Should I
        drill the post, put something through it and tap up?  I'm almost
        ready for the LBS, but not quite.  OR is it time for a new bike.
        Charlie
         

      • peter
        ... Probably not time for a new bike, but it might be time for a new seat post. Probably what you have is electrolysis. Since you got the seat post to turn,
        Message 3 of 5 , May 1, 2004
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          At 10:43 AM 5/1/04, Charlie wrote:
          >Hey folks: This week in the middle of a ride my bolt holding my
          >seat to my seat post broke. After riding home (8.5miles) standing
          >up I decided to fix the problem. Tried different bolts, clamps
          >etc. Nothing seemed to work well with the existing post. I think
          >the grooves in the original clamp were somewhat worn. I then tried
          >to remove the post. No way. Wouldn't budge. This is my main
          >commuter bike with lots of miles, snow , salt etc.. I guess the post
          >(kalloy) 'rusted' to the cro-mo frame. Doesn't look rusty tho'. I
          >then put a pipe(yes pipe) wrench to the post and oiled the post.
          >After 2 days of this I have freed the post but can't remove it. It
          >spins with lots of force but does not come up and out. Should I
          >drill the post, put something through it and tap up? I'm almost
          >ready for the LBS, but not quite. OR is it time for a new bike.


          Probably not time for a new bike, but it might be time for a new
          seat post.

          Probably what you have is electrolysis. Since you got the seat
          post to turn, you can probably get it out, but it won't be easy. What has
          happened is that the two different metals have essentially brazed
          themselves to each other. You broke the bond, but now you'll have to
          wrestle the post out of the tube, which now has a rough surface and
          therefore lots of friction.

          Keep turning it. That will wear down the roughness inside the
          tube. Use more oil, especially penetrating oil.

          You may have to use something that will give you some mechanical
          advantage to get the post out. Something like a pipe nipple screwed into
          another pipe nipple that fits over the post and rests on the top
          tube. Clamp a vice grip on the seat post at the top of the pipe. Use two
          pipe wrenches and unscrew the nipples. Be careful, however. You could
          damage the top tube. Someone else may think of a better system to
          accomplish this.

          When you do get the seat post out, ream out the seat tube to make
          the inside surface smooth again.


          Peter
        • Ian Walsh
          As with most mechanical problems, the first thing you should do is go to sheldonbrown.com and see what he has to say on the topic. A saddle is the best way to
          Message 4 of 5 , May 3, 2004
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            As with most mechanical problems, the first thing you should do is go to
            sheldonbrown.com and see what he has to say on the topic. A saddle is the
            best way to hold a post while you extract it. I think I would set the bike
            upside down, so I could put my feet on the saddle while pulling up and
            turning the frame. Since the post is moving, I believe you'll be able to get
            it out this way, rather than having to cut it out.

            Be aware though, you probably will have to clean out and hone the seat tube
            before putting another post in.

            On the other hand, this also sounds like new bike, if you need an excuse
            with the SO.



            -----Original Message-----
            From: peter [mailto:peterstj@...]
            Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2004 10:43 PM
            To: BikeWashingtonDC@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] stuck seat post


            At 10:43 AM 5/1/04, Charlie wrote:
            >Hey folks: This week in the middle of a ride my bolt holding my seat
            >to my seat post broke. After riding home (8.5miles) standing up I
            >decided to fix the problem. Tried different bolts, clamps etc.
            >Nothing seemed to work well with the existing post. I think
            >the grooves in the original clamp were somewhat worn. I then tried
            >to remove the post. No way. Wouldn't budge. This is my main commuter
            >bike with lots of miles, snow , salt etc.. I guess the post
            >(kalloy) 'rusted' to the cro-mo frame. Doesn't look rusty tho'. I
            >then put a pipe(yes pipe) wrench to the post and oiled the post. After
            >2 days of this I have freed the post but can't remove it. It spins
            >with lots of force but does not come up and out. Should I drill the
            >post, put something through it and tap up? I'm almost ready for the
            >LBS, but not quite. OR is it time for a new bike.


            Probably not time for a new bike, but it might be time for a new
            seat post.

            Probably what you have is electrolysis. Since you got the seat
            post to turn, you can probably get it out, but it won't be easy. What has
            happened is that the two different metals have essentially brazed
            themselves to each other. You broke the bond, but now you'll have to
            wrestle the post out of the tube, which now has a rough surface and
            therefore lots of friction.

            Keep turning it. That will wear down the roughness inside the
            tube. Use more oil, especially penetrating oil.

            You may have to use something that will give you some mechanical
            advantage to get the post out. Something like a pipe nipple screwed into
            another pipe nipple that fits over the post and rests on the top
            tube. Clamp a vice grip on the seat post at the top of the pipe. Use two
            pipe wrenches and unscrew the nipples. Be careful, however. You could
            damage the top tube. Someone else may think of a better system to
            accomplish this.

            When you do get the seat post out, ream out the seat tube to make
            the inside surface smooth again.


            Peter






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          • Ed Krafsur
            If worst comes to worst, you can cut the seat post a little above the collar. Then, by inserting a hack-saw blade down the remaining seatpost, cut through to
            Message 5 of 5 , May 3, 2004
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              If worst comes to worst, you can cut the seat post a little above the
              collar. Then, by inserting a hack-saw blade down the remaining
              seatpost, cut through to the frame. One or two cuts and you should be
              able to dislodge it.

              peter wrote:
              > At 10:43 AM 5/1/04, Charlie wrote:
              >
              >>Hey folks: This week in the middle of a ride my bolt holding my
              >>seat to my seat post broke. After riding home (8.5miles) standing
              >>up I decided to fix the problem. Tried different bolts, clamps
              >>etc. Nothing seemed to work well with the existing post. I think
              >>the grooves in the original clamp were somewhat worn. I then tried
              >>to remove the post. No way. Wouldn't budge. This is my main
              >>commuter bike with lots of miles, snow , salt etc.. I guess the post
              >>(kalloy) 'rusted' to the cro-mo frame. Doesn't look rusty tho'. I
              >>then put a pipe(yes pipe) wrench to the post and oiled the post.
              >>After 2 days of this I have freed the post but can't remove it. It
              >>spins with lots of force but does not come up and out. Should I
              >>drill the post, put something through it and tap up? I'm almost
              >>ready for the LBS, but not quite. OR is it time for a new bike.
              >
              >
              >
              > Probably not time for a new bike, but it might be time for a new
              > seat post.
              >
              > Probably what you have is electrolysis. Since you got the seat
              > post to turn, you can probably get it out, but it won't be easy. What has
              > happened is that the two different metals have essentially brazed
              > themselves to each other. You broke the bond, but now you'll have to
              > wrestle the post out of the tube, which now has a rough surface and
              > therefore lots of friction.
              >
              > Keep turning it. That will wear down the roughness inside the
              > tube. Use more oil, especially penetrating oil.
              >
              > You may have to use something that will give you some mechanical
              > advantage to get the post out. Something like a pipe nipple screwed into
              > another pipe nipple that fits over the post and rests on the top
              > tube. Clamp a vice grip on the seat post at the top of the pipe. Use two
              > pipe wrenches and unscrew the nipples. Be careful, however. You could
              > damage the top tube. Someone else may think of a better system to
              > accomplish this.
              >
              > When you do get the seat post out, ream out the seat tube to make
              > the inside surface smooth again.
              >
              >
              > Peter
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > unsubscribe@...
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >

              --
              Ed Krafsur
              AAAS Project 2061
              ekrafsur@...
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