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Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] Resolution to hit-and-run case on Rhode Island Ave

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  • Carole Jacobs
    About a year in jail for manslaughter by vehicle while drunk seems to be the going thing here is the District. 
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
      About a year in jail for manslaughter by vehicle while drunk seems to be the going thing here is the District.  http://www.wusa9.com/news/article/197592/158/Anthony-Randolph-Sentenced-For-Negligent-Homicide-After-Fatal-Moped-Accident-On-Key-Bridge    

      I do not get it.  Perhaps in Mr. Randolph's case we did not want to spend a lot of money incarcerating him because neither he nor the victim was a DC resident?    What should we expect in the recent Ruby Whitfield case, where the victim was one of ours, although not the drunk driver who fled the scene.  I think some insight into the thinking of the DA's office on the issue of bodily injury or death caused by drivers who are drunk, hostile, or both would be helpful.


      From: Jim Titus <jtitus@...>
      To: Christopher Range <lcms0516@...>
      Cc: bikewashingtondc@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, April 4, 2013 3:26 PM
      Subject: Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] Resolution to hit-and-run case on Rhode Island Ave

       
      No, it is not marginalized in the Courts. It was marginalized in the US
      Attorney's Office. Compare the PG County State's attorney who got a
      decent prison sentence for the killer of Natasha Pettigrew, who committed
      hit and run but did not crash on purpose.

      DC residents who are outraged might want to contact Norton's office to
      ensure that these types of prosecutions are discussed with the next person
      to be appointed US Attorney.

      US attorneys elsewhere do not have to deal with these garden variety
      criminals, so anyone appoined US attorney may have an inherent tendency to
      avoid these cases, where possible. While Norton does not have a vote in
      the Senate, the home-state elected official is usually consulted when the
      US Attorney is appointed, and she needs to raise this issue with DOJ. But
      she won't unless you raise this issue with her.

      Jim

      > On 4/4/2013 12:47 PM, Geof Gee wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> From two years ago! Video included in the link.
      >> http://tiny.cc/2kz0uw
      >>
      >> or
      >>
      >> http://washingtonexaminer.com/former-d.c.-cop-admits-to-hit-and-run-of-cyclist/article/2526149
      >>
      >> I'm just a layperson here, but doesn't this seem awfully light for a
      >> hit-and-run case?
      >>
      >> -G
      >
      > More than light!!!
      >
      > Here is a link from the Jamison Koehler law firm in DC:Hit n' Run
      > <http://koehlerlaw.net/dui-dwi/fleeing-scene-of-accident/>
      >
      > So, It is obvious that, despite the video clearly showing what was done,
      > the life and property of a cyclist is marginalized in the courts, as not
      > important. Like a cyclist is a 'non-person'!!!!!!!
      >
      > Christopher
      >



    • Christopher Range
      ... Jim, It was. A judge can not only second-guess a jury s recommendation(even ignoring it entirely). A judge can do the same with the prosecutor and
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
        On 4/4/2013 3:26 PM, Jim Titus wrote:
        > No, it is not marginalized in the Courts. It was marginalized in the US
        > Attorney's Office. Compare the PG County State's attorney who got a
        > decent prison sentence for the killer of Natasha Pettigrew, who committed
        > hit and run but did not crash on purpose.
        >
        > DC residents who are outraged might want to contact Norton's office to
        > ensure that these types of prosecutions are discussed with the next person
        > to be appointed US Attorney.
        >
        > US attorneys elsewhere do not have to deal with these garden variety
        > criminals, so anyone appoined US attorney may have an inherent tendency to
        > avoid these cases, where possible. While Norton does not have a vote in
        > the Senate, the home-state elected official is usually consulted when the
        > US Attorney is appointed, and she needs to raise this issue with DOJ. But
        > she won't unless you raise this issue with her.
        >
        > Jim

        Jim, It was. A judge can not only second-guess a jury's
        recommendation(even ignoring it entirely). A judge can do the same with
        the prosecutor and sentence someone to an even stiffer sentence.
      • Jim Titus
        I very much doubt that the US Attorney considers whether a victim or perpetrator lives in the District of Columbia. He probably does consider the amount of
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
          I very much doubt that the US Attorney considers whether a victim or perpetrator lives in the District of Columbia.  He probably does consider the amount of political heat, and a Maryland Congressman or Senator can certainly provide that political heat as effectively as the DC Council.  But for that to happen, someone probably would need to make some noise. 
           
          The fact that even drunk killers only spend a year in jail provides additional context for why there might be no jail time for an assault without bodily damage.   Our retired policeman with anger management problems probably got a sentence comparable to what he would have faced had he punched someone without provocation in a bar.
           
          Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2013 3:59 PM
          Subject: Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] Resolution to hit-and-run case on Rhode Island Ave
           
          About a year in jail for manslaughter by vehicle while drunk seems to be the going thing here is the District.  http://www.wusa9.com/news/article/197592/158/Anthony-Randolph-Sentenced-For-Negligent-Homicide-After-Fatal-Moped-Accident-On-Key-Bridge    

          I do not get it.  Perhaps in Mr. Randolph's case we did not want to spend a lot of money incarcerating him because neither he nor the victim was a DC resident?    What should we expect in the recent Ruby Whitfield case, where the victim was one of ours, although not the drunk driver who fled the scene.  I think some insight into the thinking of the DA's office on the issue of bodily injury or death caused by drivers who are drunk, hostile, or both would be helpful.
           

          From: Jim Titus <jtitus@...>
          To: Christopher Range <lcms0516@...>
          Cc: bikewashingtondc@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, April 4, 2013 3:26 PM
          Subject: Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] Resolution to hit-and-run case on Rhode Island Ave
           
           
          No, it is not marginalized in the Courts. It was marginalized in the US
          Attorney's Office. Compare the PG County State's attorney who got a
          decent prison sentence for the killer of Natasha Pettigrew, who committed
          hit and run but did not crash on purpose.

          DC residents who are outraged might want to contact Norton's office to
          ensure that these types of prosecutions are discussed with the next person
          to be appointed US Attorney.

          US attorneys elsewhere do not have to deal with these garden variety
          criminals, so anyone appoined US attorney may have an inherent tendency to
          avoid these cases, where possible. While Norton does not have a vote in
          the Senate, the home-state elected official is usually consulted when the
          US Attorney is appointed, and she needs to raise this issue with DOJ. But
          she won't unless you raise this issue with her.

          Jim

          > On
          4/4/2013 12:47 PM, Geof Gee wrote:
          >>
          >>
          >> From two
          years ago! Video included in the link.
          >>
          href="http://tiny.cc/2kz0uw" rel=nofollow target=_blank>http://tiny.cc/2kz0uw
          >>
          >>
          or
          >>
          >>
          http://washingtonexaminer.com/former-d.c.-cop-admits-to-hit-and-run-of-cyclist/article/2526149
          >>
          >>
          I'm just a layperson here, but doesn't this seem awfully light for a
          >>
          hit-and-run case?
          >>
          >> -G
          >
          > More than
          light!!!
          >
          > Here is a link from the Jamison Koehler law firm in
          DC:Hit n' Run
          >
          <http://koehlerlaw.net/dui-dwi/fleeing-scene-of-accident/>
          >
          >
          So, It is obvious that, despite the video clearly showing what was done,
          >
          the life and property of a cyclist is marginalized in the courts, as not
          >
          important. Like a cyclist is a 'non-person'!!!!!!!
          >
          >
          Christopher
          >



        • Jonathan Krall
          Yes, that was a very light sentence for using a car to intentionally injure a person. FWIW, this guy agrees:
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 4, 2013
            Yes, that was a very light sentence for using a car to intentionally injure a person. FWIW, this guy agrees:
             
            http://www.washingtonian.com/blogs/capitalcomment/local-news/dc-should-be-tougher-on-drivers-who-hit-bikers.php
             

            On April 4, 2013 at 11:47 AM Geof Gee <geoffreygee@...> wrote:
             

             

            From two years ago!  Video included in the link.  
             
             
            http://tiny.cc/2kz0uw
             
            or 
             
            http://washingtonexaminer.com/former-d.c.-cop-admits-to-hit-and-run-of-cyclist/article/2526149
             
            I'm just a layperson here, but doesn't this seem awfully light for a hit-and-run case?  
             
            -G
             
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

            "Growing up is a terribly hard thing to do. It is much easier to skip it and go from one childhood to another." F.S.F.

             


             
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