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Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] my altercation on Rock Creek Parkway this morning

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  • drey samuelson
    Peter:  Yes, that s a great idea.  Has anyone ever contacted the NPS about it?  If so, what did they say?  Jonathan--I wish I had a better memory of what
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 21, 2013
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      Peter:  Yes, that's a great idea.  Has anyone ever contacted the NPS about it?  If so, what did they say? 

      Jonathan--I wish I had a better memory of what his pick-up looked like--all I remember, in the heat of the moment, is that it had Maryland license plates...  I have to figure out how to get this video camera mounted on my helmet--I had a fantasy later about pulling up next to him and saying something like: "Smile, your on Candid Camera, mofo!"



      From: P.C. Kohler <kohl57@...>
      To: BikeWDC <BikeWashingtonDC@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2013 3:54 PM
      Subject: Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] my altercation on Rock Creek Parkway this morning

       
      The Parkway is real problem... same thing has happened to me half a dozen times. What is needed and I've been asking for them forever are the same "Share The Road" signs that are on Beach Drive. 
       
      Not sure where this occured, for me it's usually close enough to the Zoo tunnel that one can easy catch up with the motorist stuck in traffic and "exchange pleasantries".
       
      What the WABA really needs to do is lobby the Park Service to get these Share the Roads signs posted. We don't need anymore bike lanes, "side paths", studies or other nonsenses... just basic signage reminding what the LAW is... and the police to earn their keep by ENFORCING THE LAW. Period.
       
      Peter Kohler


    • Christopher Range
      ... WABA probably won t do it, for legal reasons. Because motorists will be allowed to claim, I didn t see him/her . But emotionally, I sure would like to
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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        On 2/21/2013 3:32 PM, drey samuelson wrote:
        I strongly believe that WABA, or some like-minded entity, should include on their website a menu item where cyclists could list the license plate numbers of aggressive drivers, and my near accident on Rock Creek Parkway is a good example of the need for it.  I was riding to work on the Parkway (on the far righthand side of the road)--not the pathetically rutted trail that parallels it--when a pick-up passed me, the driver yelling out an epithet at me, and I--perhaps stupidly--responded in kind.  That might have been the end of it, but apparently cyclists aren't permitted to respond to jerk-drivers swearing at them, and with me directly behind him he slammed on his brakes, causing me to slam on mine and miss the back of his truck by about six inches as I swerved around him to the right.  I rode up to the open passenger's window to confront him and he yelled out something like--"hey, asshole, get on the bike trail!"  And then he drove off...  I, of course, didn't remember his license plate number, but I just purchased a helmet video camera, and in the future I'll have stuff like that on tape--and the reason why it's valuable is that if this fool actually hurts someone on a bike, we can use his license number as evidence that he has exhibited aggressive actions against cyclists...

        WABA probably won't do it, for legal reasons.  Because motorists' will be allowed to claim, 'I didn't see him/her'.

        But emotionally, I sure would like to see this being done.

        Personally, After I replace my bike computer(Garmin Edge 200(GPS); I have the Blackburn Delphi 6.0(Magnet) as a backup) with the Garmin Edge 500, I will start looking into getting two video cameras(GoPro Hero 3), that I will use with GoPro's Chest Mount Strap.  Not just to cut down on wind resistance.  But also, to be inconspicuous so motorists' won't be alerted to their existence by them being on my helmet.
      • Christopher Range
        ... Agreed They are along Old Georgetown Road in Bethesda. They need to be everywhere. Christopher
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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          On 2/21/2013 3:54 PM, P.C. Kohler wrote:
          The Parkway is real problem... same thing has happened to me half a dozen times. What is needed and I've been asking for them forever are the same "Share The Road" signs that are on Beach Drive. 
           
          Not sure where this occured, for me it's usually close enough to the Zoo tunnel that one can easy catch up with the motorist stuck in traffic and "exchange pleasantries".
           
          What the WABA really needs to do is lobby the Park Service to get these Share the Roads signs posted. We don't need anymore bike lanes, "side paths", studies or other nonsenses... just basic signage reminding what the LAW is... and the police to earn their keep by ENFORCING THE LAW. Period.
           
          Peter Kohler
          Agreed

          They are along Old Georgetown Road in Bethesda.  They need to be everywhere.

          Christopher
        • Christopher Range
          ... Jonathan, If you are referring to the surgeon who pulled that stunt, out in L.A., he lost his medical license and got five years in prison. But to his
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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            On 2/21/2013 4:31 PM, Jonathan Krall wrote:
            This should be reported to the police. In a similar case in Los Angeles within the past few years,
            a driver behaving this way was reported more than once before he seriously injured two cyclists
            this way (I didn't recall whether or not there was a fatality). Because there had bee multiple
            reports the police took it seriously and that person did time in jail.
             
            Please document what you can and report it to the police. Some other rider may have already
            reported this dangerous lunatic and the police may already have license plate info to match the
            description that you provide of the car and the driver.
             
            Thanks,
             
            Jonathan

            Jonathan, If you are referring to the surgeon who pulled that stunt, out in L.A., he lost his medical license and got five years in prison.  But to his chagrin, both cyclists' survived.

            Christopher
          • drey samuelson
            I couldn t agree more--is this something that WABA could help organize? ________________________________ From: Christopher Range To:
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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              I couldn't agree more--is this something that WABA could help organize?



              From: Christopher Range <lcms0516@...>
              To: BikeWashingtonDC@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 7:44 PM
              Subject: Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] my altercation on Rock Creek Parkway this morning

               
              On 2/21/2013 3:54 PM, P.C. Kohler wrote:
              The Parkway is real problem... same thing has happened to me half a dozen times. What is needed and I've been asking for them forever are the same "Share The Road" signs that are on Beach Drive. 
               
              Not sure where this occured, for me it's usually close enough to the Zoo tunnel that one can easy catch up with the motorist stuck in traffic and "exchange pleasantries".
               
              What the WABA really needs to do is lobby the Park Service to get these Share the Roads signs posted. We don't need anymore bike lanes, "side paths", studies or other nonsenses... just basic signage reminding what the LAW is... and the police to earn their keep by ENFORCING THE LAW. Period.
               
              Peter Kohler
              Agreed

              They are along Old Georgetown Road in Bethesda.  They need to be everywhere.

              Christopher


            • Jonathan Krall
              ... Yes, that s the guy. He was nailed because he tried that stunt more than once and was reported to the police. As best I can tell, the police don t really
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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                On February 26, 2013 at 7:47 PM Christopher Range <lcms0516@...> wrote:
                 

                 

                On 2/21/2013 4:31 PM, Jonathan Krall wrote:
                This should be reported to the police. In a similar case in Los Angeles within the past few years,
                a driver behaving this way was reported more than once before he seriously injured two cyclists
                this way (I didn't recall whether or not there was a fatality). Because there had bee multiple
                reports the police took it seriously and that person did time in jail.
                 
                Please document what you can and report it to the police. Some other rider may have already
                reported this dangerous lunatic and the police may already have license plate info to match the
                description that you provide of the car and the driver.
                 
                Thanks,
                 
                Jonathan

                Jonathan, If you are referring to the surgeon who pulled that stunt, out in L.A., he lost his medical license and got five years in prison.  But to his chagrin, both cyclists' survived.

                Christopher

                 

                Yes, that's the guy. He was nailed because he tried that stunt more than once and was reported to the police.

                As best I can tell, the police don't really want to take reports like this from cyclists, but it is their job to take

                this info and to investigate if the same complaint keeps cropping up. They will do everything they can to

                discourage such reporting until they decide it's important (then they'll pretend they thought it was important

                all along).

                 

                Jonathan

                 

                 

              • Jim Titus
                Did you go to the WABA annual meeting this evening? From: drey samuelson Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 10:48 PM To: Christopher Range ;
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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                  Did you go to the WABA annual meeting this evening?
                   
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 10:48 PM
                  Subject: Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] my altercation on Rock Creek Parkway this morning
                   
                   

                  I couldn't agree more--is this something that WABA could help organize?

                   

                  From: Christopher Range <lcms0516@...>
                  To: BikeWashingtonDC@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 7:44 PM
                  Subject: Re: [BikeWashingtonDC] my altercation on Rock Creek Parkway this morning
                   
                   
                  On 2/21/2013 3:54 PM, P.C. Kohler wrote:
                  The Parkway is real problem... same thing has happened to me half a dozen times. What is needed and I've been asking for them forever are the same "Share The Road" signs that are on Beach Drive. 
                   
                  Not sure where this occured, for me it's usually close enough to the Zoo tunnel that one can easy catch up with the motorist stuck in traffic and "exchange pleasantries".
                   
                  What the WABA really needs to do is lobby the Park Service to get these Share the Roads signs posted. We don't need anymore bike lanes, "side paths", studies or other nonsenses... just basic signage reminding what the LAW is... and the police to earn their keep by ENFORCING THE LAW. Period.
                   
                  Peter Kohler
                  Agreed

                  They are along Old Georgetown Road in Bethesda.  They need to be everywhere.

                  Christopher


                • drey samuelson
                  which really is one of the gems of our region... ________________ Lenny Bernstein MisFits columnist In praise of a reliable workout buddy Michael S.
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 28, 2013
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                    which really is one of the gems of our region...
                    ________________
                    Lenny Bernstein
                    MisFits columnist

                    In praise of a reliable workout buddy

                    Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post - The Capital Crescent Trail is an 11-mile arc of wooded refuge that runs through the heart of suburbia and deep into the city, from Silver Spring in the northeast to Georgetown in the southwest.

                    By Lenny Bernstein, Published: February 26

                    It’s easy to take your most reliable running buddy for granted, or to forget, over time, how lucky you are to have that one friend who’s truly there anytime you want to go for a bike ride.
                    I’m referring, of course, to myself and the Capital Crescent Trail, an 11-mile arc of wooded refuge that runs through the heart of suburbia and deep into the city, from Silver Spring in the northeast to Georgetown in the southwest. If it’s weird for an adult to express affection for a sloping stretch of pavement, to admit a crush on crushed gravel, so be it. I’m certainly not the only one.

                    “When you try to estimate . . . what a trail like this is worth,” says Jake Lynch, spokesman for the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, a national advocacy group, “that sort of value is priceless. You can’t put a price on it.”
                    “You’re seeing the Potomac. You’re seeing the woods. You’re getting out of the urban environment almost immediately,” says Ron Tripp, chairman of the Coalition for the Capital Crescent Trail, the local volunteer organization that helped get the trail built, beginning in the late 1980s, and now maintains and improves it.
                    “It provides this rural wooded setting. . . . It is a very convenient place to get out of an urban environment and do whatever [you] want to do.”
                    Indeed it is. I’ve walked, run and biked every inch of the CCT hundreds of times over the years — in the dark and at dawn, in 95-degree summers and 10-degree winters, alone and with groups of more than 100. I know the location of every water fountain, pothole, access point and secluded emergency pit stop. I plan my workouts around them. We all do.
                    Yet the trail is also a major commuter artery, a rush-hour bike highway whose traffic increases every year. That dual purpose makes the CCT a rare and valuable asset among the nation’s 1,768 rail trails, which cover more than 20,000 miles.
                    A 2006 survey, the most recent, revealed that more than 1 million people used the CCT annually, a total that Lynch and Tripp are certain has been greatly surpassed in the ensuing seven years. But even that outdated figure puts the CCT among the most heavily traveled rail trails in the United States, along with the Minuteman Bikeway outside Boston and the Midtown Greenway in Minneapolis. At almost every point where coalition volunteers counted trail users, cyclists were dominant, with runners second.
                    “When we’re talking about a trail like the CCT,” says Lynch, “the two things are urban utility . . . and public health, making sure there are pathways for people to walk and stroll.”
                    The conversion of unprofitable, abandoned railroad rights-of-way to trails began in 1983 with the passage of federal legislation allowing “railbanking,” which keeps sometimes lengthy corridors of land intact but diverts them to other uses.
                    The CCT was completed in pieces between 1988 and 2003, though the stretch from the tunnel under Route 355 in Bethesda to the Lyttonsville area of Silver Spring, known as the Georgetown Branch, remains unpaved and retains an “interim” designation.
                    “The timing on that conversion was ideal,” Tripp says. “There were just enough people looking forward at the time to see the value.”
                    The CCT has its problems, not the least of which is that the currently unfunded Purple Line light rail would run right down the Georgetown Branch. Even if a proposed 12-foot-wide paved trail is built alongside it, I’d have to reserve judgment about using it. That would be a very different experience from running on crushed gravel beneath overhanging limbs.
                    In October, the only violent attack anyone can remember on the CCT occurred when a woman was knocked unconscious and sexually assaulted while running on the trail one evening between Massachusetts Avenue and MacArthur Boulevard. The case remains unsolved. Some months earlier, there were two attempted robberies and a robbery farther north.
                    Despite those incidents and its heavy use, the CCT remains one of the safest, most graffiti-free stretches of public land you’ll find. On the three-plus miles they patrol between Bethesda and the District line, Maryland-National Capital Park Police responded to just 20 crime reports in 2012, only a handful of them for serious offenses, according to officer Sabrina Pirtle.
                    And of course, on weekends in good weather the trail is so crowded that some friction is inevitable as speedy cyclists tangle with slower walkers and runners. There have been collisions with cars where the trail crosses roads. Tussles continue about other future development.
                    “The biggest problem the trail has,” Tripp says, “is that it’s a victim of its own success.”
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