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RE: [Bicycle_Restoration] Re: Hello all. New member. Question Schwinn

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  • Steve Birmingham
    Not a bed video. The guy making those is/was a member here. Nice basic videos that won’t confuse someone new to mechanical stuff. The headset one didn’t
    Message 1 of 37 , Jan 29, 2011

      Not a bed video. The guy making those is/was a member here.

       

      Nice basic videos that won’t confuse someone new to mechanical stuff.

       

      The headset one didn’t seem to have audio for me, but it could be a computer or cable thing on my end.

      And there isn’t much info about what to do if it goes wrong, or if there’s a problem with the parts.

       

      If I get a chance, I might do a few videos of my own this summer. There’s a few oldtime mechanic tricks I learned while working on industrial stuff

      that I’d like to teach.

       

       

      Steve B

       

      From: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of david folch
      Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2011 01:36 AM
      To: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Bicycle_Restoration] Re: Hello all. New member. Question Schwinn

       

       

      well maybe I should have just watch this

      http://bicycletutor.com/overhaul-threaded-headset/

      :-O

      ok, tomorrow, I'm bringing the frame+fork to be checked (alignment) to see if there's more than the cracks in the paint on the head tube...

    • Rich
      Sherwin Williams Automotive (there s one in my neighborhood -off walden ave in cheektowaga ny) offers rattle cans of automotive clear and custom mixed-to orig.
      Message 37 of 37 , Feb 21, 2011
        Sherwin Williams Automotive (there's one in my neighborhood -off walden ave in cheektowaga ny) offers rattle cans of automotive clear and custom mixed-to orig. bike color-rattle cans.
        I used their clear coat on the LeTour Tourist. Lot clearer and seemingly a lot harder/tougher than the stuff in harware or pep boys style auto parts stores.
        Rich Mc.

        --- In Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com, "Paulos, Richard G" <rick-paulos@...> wrote:
        >
        > Yeah, clear spray paint on the pitted chrome surfaces is fine. I also use car wax but that needs redoing every year more or less.
        >
        > Go slow with the clear. It's usually rather runny and dries slow. There are lots of clears for art work that give you a cloudy or matte look. Not what you would want on chrome.
        > You don't need a thick coat. The goal is to just seal the pin holes. Hang the parts vertically so dust doesn't land in the paint while it's drying.
        >
        > A well waxed bike is much easier to keep clean and doesn't attract as much dirt to start with.
        >
        > Rick
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________________
        > From: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com [Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Craig Maefs [cmaefs@...]
        > Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2011 9:20 AM
        > To: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: RE: [Bicycle_Restoration] Re: Photos and hubs [3 Attachments]
        >
        > [Attachment(s) from Craig Maefs included below]
        > Hello everyone. I am new to this forum and have been enjoying your problem solving skills!
        >
        > My project to get a pair of 1970's Raleigh Sport 3 speeds set up for riding (Not restoration to 1970's condition but rebuilt to be usable as city cruisers). So far I have dissembled the entire bike (the lady's) and stripped the paint and rust. I have primed and painted the frame, fork, and fenders. I must say these are some well-built bikes. Everything came apart without any difficulty at all. Things like the seat post and stem were well greased and in good shape. The bikes had a lot of surface rust but nothing that was deep or pitted. The chrome on the handle bars has been penetrated by rust and although 95% or better of the chrome is intact, there are places where pin head sized pieces have flaked off. I am not sure how to protect the remaining chrome and cover the bare metal exposed where the chrome failed so that rust does not reappear. I was thinking of putting clear lacquer over the exposed parts of the stem and handlebars. All the other parts seem salvageable. Any thoughts or help on this repair/restoration would be appreciated.
        >
        > Craig R. Maefs
        > LTC, U.S. Army(Ret)
        >
        > From: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rich
        > Sent: Friday, February 18, 2011 10:51 AM
        > To: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Bicycle_Restoration] Re: Photos and hubs
        >
        >
        >
        > Bad news good news Bad news etc.
        > Bad news..Got to going over the frame and installing the SH54 taper BB and...the BB in frame has a crack (possibly due to the chrome plating?)
        > Good news..
        > Guy took the frame back and refunded $$ no problem.
        > Bad news..Now I have to find another frame (hey...I'm picky what can I say
        > Good news, if I go with an old school bike I have several 80-100mm alloy stems, and a set of 27" SS wheels I picked up at last years swap meet. (saves a bundle)
        > Band news..had my heart set on the chrome and red combination.
        > Rich "Dad said There's A Reason For Everything" Mc.
        >
        > --- In Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>, "Rich" <mcyak@<mailto:mcyak@>> wrote:
        > >
        > > I'm going to (I promise!) make a photo album of the build.
        > > Biggest problem I have requires a GEEK to come over and erase whatever gremlin it is that keeps blocking my sending photos once they're in the darn album. Rod Sterling would have had a field day with the new technology and gremlins.
        > > I may have to use sons laptop to load and transfer the photos.
        > > I'm thinking this frame /fork setup was origionally intended as a single speed (by whomever manufactured it)but for a fat tire SS.
        > > The 126mm spacing in the rear dropout totally conflicts with the rearword facing dropout setup.
        > > All virgin territory for me :oD!
        > > I'm going with polished alluminum and chrome off set by red wheels and red grips on the inverted northroad bars.
        > > Sence I'm taking this on club rides (no lilly dippers on most of niagara frontiers rides)lightweight is playing a part and I am watching the grams.
        > > I AM totally bummed that the E3 Gel saddles are not to be found any longer (although their inventor-joshua-assured me a replacement is in the works....why would you mess with a great saddle?)Knew I should have bought a third one when they were available from Performance Bike..8o(
        > > Most of the parts came from curbside collections (aka garbage picking)
        > > so the wheels will be the large ticket in this.
        > >
        > > On the 7speed hubs.
        > > When you can and what you can Steve.
        > > The spacing on the Paramount is 126. I can give you the overall length of the axel on the oem hub if it'll help.
        > >
        > > Um...did I mention the complete motor kit I got on craigslist?
        > > Looks like gas is going into th wild blue yonder and I've got Forbes Indian sourced bike togeather and it looks like it's a match made in..well, whereever.
        > > It'll let me get to and from the job (evenings)with a bit less wear and tear.(although, my susan-short legs and all-spotted the mockup in the bikeroom and set her eyes on it OO)
        > > Need to come up with a good (excellent) lighting system tho.
        > > and..the oem wheels ?
        > > Need something I can hook disc brakes to.
        > > Maby I'll go pick the brains over on the electrical forum of bikeforums.net.
        > > Later guys.
        > > Rich Mc.
        > > hey..what ever happened to that gal from new zealand??
        > >
        > > --- In Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>, "Steve Birmingham" <sbirmingham@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Now that chrome frame sounds interesting. Any pics? I'd avoid threadless on
        > > > an old frame, it just looks odd. I know a place that has or can get
        > > > inexpensive chrome replacement forks….
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > 110mm front hubs? Tandem maybe, most are 100.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > I had a look at the hubs I could find easily in the 5 minutes the baby gave
        > > > me. I have a road hub shell, and enough internals to make nearly any spacing
        > > > you'd like. I'm not positive about a 7 speed freehub body, but I'm pretty
        > > > sure I have at least one. Most of the junker wheels are still under snow.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Steve B
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > From: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > [mailto:Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of Rich
        > > > Sent: Monday, February 14, 2011 09:19 PM
        > > > To: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > Subject: [Bicycle_Restoration] Re: Hello all. New member. Question Schwinn
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Regarding single speeds (at my age I bruise too easily and bleed too hard
        > > > for a fixed gear antyhing)
        > > > I've no idea the origin of the chrome rear facing dropout road bike I bought
        > > > (for a mere $40)from the owner of all the bike stuff laying at the curb
        > > > (most of which is now at my place OO)but it gave me the excuse for another
        > > > project and something (chrome goes with everything)
        > > > I could play with the colors on.
        > > > I'm discovering a under 20 lb bike is possible at a very reasonable price.
        > > > The alloy northroads that were in the pile will have a new home inverted on
        > > > the SS.
        > > > Discovered also is the fact that spacers for threadless stem to 25.4 road
        > > > bars abound for very reasonable prices (although Velo-Orange has a new
        > > > threadless to 25.4 in chrome that...would really look nice.
        > > > The "trash pile" rewarded me with a nice set of cane creek sidepulls that'll
        > > > go nicely on the bike and a pair of bmx style levers with the spring returns
        > > > :o))
        > > > And, of course, the availability of 120mm flip flop and 110 front hubs
        > > > available (can get them fine..a 127mm7speed is hens teeth..lol)
        > > > affords one yet another reason to 'build wheels' (it's like knitting for
        > > > senior males)
        > > > and all this brings me to the upcomming bike swap being held here april 3rd.
        > > > where I'll be cash and list in hand.
        > > > This will make three bikes restored, One bike built up from scratch, two
        > > > vintage bikes upgraded yet kept in pristine condition(and all the nos parts
        > > > are polished and bagged) and one new (as of 08) bike.
        > > > Rich Mc.
        > > >
        > > > --- In Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > <mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com> , "Steve Birmingham"
        > > > <sbirmingham@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > What I've seen lately in the fixies is a move toward not removing
        > > > > everything. I'm considering making decorative stuff that mounts on shifter
        > > > > bosses and hangers, I think it might sell ok.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Most of the frames being converted aren't high end ones, and if they
        > > > weren't
        > > > > converted they would either be recycled, landfill, or donated to be sent
        > > > to
        > > > > a developing nation. Anything that keeps a common production bike running
        > > > > and ridden is mostly ok by me. Some more ok than others.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > The bikes the shop had that languished for 3-4 years went to bikes not
        > > > > bombs. For most production bikes in typical condition I don't feel at all
        > > > > bad if they get converted. There's thousands of them out there. Nicer ones
        > > > > I try to convince people to leave it original, even to the point of
        > > > offering
        > > > > a trade – In one case an identical frame with bad paint +cash. No takers….
        > > > > And some of the original paint schemes are just as bad as the neon colors
        > > > > being used now. 10 and 12 speeds are already becoming popular again
        > > > > especially if the area isn't flat. Our shop is on a flat rail trail, but
        > > > the
        > > > > town is steep hills on either side. Speeds are pretty popular.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > The most recent powder job we worked on was a Univega Mixte. Powdered
        > > > blue,
        > > > > similar to the original but a much nicer shade. Built up with a mix of
        > > > newer
        > > > > and older stuff as a flat bar commuting /shopping bike. Single speed but
        > > > not
        > > > > fixed. It came out beautiful. And it can have speeds added at any time.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Powder isn't hard to strip for a pro shop. Chemical then media blast. A
        > > > bit
        > > > > tougher to do at home, especially if you insist on using "natural"
        > > > cleaners
        > > > > which aren't aggressive enough. you can rough it up and paint over it too.
        > > > > Oddly the worst paint I've ever tried to remove is the white lead paint on
        > > > > my house. The parts that aren't peeling resist almost any paint stripper
        > > > > I've tried. The orange based stripper did do a nice job of cleaning it.
        > > > The
        > > > > only stuff that worked at all was the stuff that was soaked into cloth
        > > > left
        > > > > to sit for a couple hours then peeled off. Expensive, and after doing the
        > > > > math I decided against spending more than the house to get the paint off.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Steve B
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > From: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > <mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > > [mailto:Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > <mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Paul Schmidt
        > > > > Sent: Saturday, February 12, 2011 12:44 PM
        > > > > To: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > <mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > > Subject: Re: [Bicycle_Restoration] Re: Hello all. New member. Question
        > > > > Schwinn
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > I think there are some questions about powder coat, and maybe you know the
        > > > > answer, maybe not, lets try anyway....
        > > > >
        > > > > How much stuff are people now doing to old frames that 10 years from now
        > > > > they will be wishing they didn't, like take half the steel frames ever
        > > > built
        > > > > and hack off everything to make it a fixie and then powder coated it a
        > > > cross
        > > > > between neon puke green and lemon yellow. Of course the problem is that in
        > > > > 2020, 10 and 12 speeds (retro) will be as popular as free money because
        > > > > there will be so few left, and here is Bubba trying to get the powder off
        > > > so
        > > > > they can braze on a hanger and cable stops, before painting it the colour
        > > > it
        > > > > was in 1978, when it was built, to take advantage of the new 10/12 speed
        > > > > craze.
        > > > >
        > > > > Everything I have heard about powder coating is that the stuff is hideous
        > > > to
        > > > > remove, so what if you get the colour wrong or later want to change it?
        > > > > Paint is easy, bead blast off the paint, sand and repaint.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > On 11-02-12 09:53 AM, Steve Birmingham wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Looks pretty good. It still has a couple marks/cracks on the lower headlug
        > > > > That might concern me, but those could be brazed with silver and I think
        > > > it
        > > > > would be just fine . (if they are cracks. Heating with the torch would
        > > > prove
        > > > > it as the edges of the crack heat up first) Silver braze would also make a
        > > > > good filler if they're just gouges.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > I'm not a huge fan of powdercoat. It's not as easy to change later, or
        > > > have
        > > > > graphics done. And most places totally don't understand what parts of a
        > > > bike
        > > > > should be masked. Few places are anywhere near as good as Spectrum. Our
        > > > shop
        > > > > had a guy we sent stuff to who was good, but who stopped answering calls
        > > > and
        > > > > hadn't done 3 frames for over 4-5 months. The replacement guy seems pretty
        > > > > good, and can do bikes so we're good again.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > It is much cheaper and way more durable than a cheap paint job.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > What I'm extremely curious about is the electric motorcycle. Looks like
        > > > it's
        > > > > actually being ridden! Was that at a café? Really impressive bit of
        > > > > machinery, most try to make it look like a gas bike rather than design
        > > > > around the requirements of an electric.
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > Steve B
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > From: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > <mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > > [mailto:Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > <mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of david
        > > > > Sent: Friday, February 11, 2011 08:36 PM
        > > > > To: Bicycle_Restoration@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > <mailto:Bicycle_Restoration%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > > Subject: [Bicycle_Restoration] Re: Hello all. New member. Question Schwinn
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > I've finally got some time after my trip to LA (where I almost bought a
        > > > > WaterFord 70cm !) to take some pics of the Schwinn frame without the
        > > > paint.
        > > > > It look good to me. I'm bringing it (and the Raleigh stripped down too) to
        > > > > be checked tomorrow.
        > > > > Next step powder coating !
        > > > > here is the link
        > > > > http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidfolch/5437043539/
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
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