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Re: [Beekeeping] Sister bees?

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  • Guro Dennis Servaes
    Ever have someone tell you they know exactly what something is like, when you know they don t have a clue, because they never had the experience to find out?
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 14, 2007
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      Ever have someone tell you they know "exactly" what something is like, when you know they don't have a clue, because they never had the experience to find out?  Especially, to know what you are going through?  We have a difficult time empathizing with others simply because we see what we look for in others based upon our own points of view.  Sorta 'takes one to know one' paradigm.  Anthropomorphism is a little word that means comparing animals or insects etc. to one's own thoughts or behaviors or  motives.   As if bees sting from anger. No bees sting as a response to stimuli.  Lots of things in nature are instinctive, and not the way people believe or imagine them to be.  If you lived a day as a honeybee then came back as a human, then you could tell us 'why' honey bees do what they do.  We know 'what' they do, and saying 'why' they do something is kind of presumptuous.  We could illicit a certain behavior by triggering a response, but that isn't really why they did it.  It is because we triggered a response.  If we let things happen instead of triggering a response then 'why' would be the right question.  A queen bee has both a mom and dad and grandparents, a worker bee has both a mom and dad and grandparents, but a drone doesn't have a father!  He has a mom and his maternal grandparents only, and he is referred to by the word haploid.  His sisters are called diploids.  We cannot know what it is like to a drone to not have a dad.  I am no expert on encaustic art and I may be wrong, but I think encaustic art is usually done with other stuff besides bee's wax, probably paraffin or some other substance, and whether or not more women are into that type of art than men or not, I don't know that either.  We can sympathize for the drone, but can we truly empathize?  I think it would still be presumptious for us to be able claim that the truth regarding a female energy transmitted from worker honeybees to the female artists is real or imaginary or even believable?  Maybe that and the sphinx's grin will have to remain a mystery. 
      dennis
       
       
       
    • marc sepesh
      Thanks for the responses--love the authority of anthropomorphism and the zany sister chicken egg tempera connex! regards, marc ... Bored stiff? Loosen
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 14, 2007
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        Thanks for the responses--love the authority of "anthropomorphism" and the zany "sister chicken" egg tempera connex!
         
        regards,
        marc


        Bored stiff? Loosen up...
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      • odessa_kai
        Thanks for the info on the Guineas. Boy, would be happy minus the grasshoppers, but not the bees! Non selective insect eaters! Suppose thats not much better
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 14, 2007
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          Thanks for the info on the Guineas. Boy, would be happy minus the
          grasshoppers, but not the bees! Non selective insect eaters! Suppose
          thats not much better than the chemicals
          CA
          --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Marco Polo" <marco5819@...> wrote:
          >
          > Once the Guineas find your hive , they will stay around all day and
          eat as many as they
          > can....then come back the next day for more.... I had a guinea that
          came and camped out
          > in the trees near my hive...all day it ate its fill... and after the
          week that sure was a good
          > taisting guinea!
          > my chickens dont bother the hives tho... but do get the occasional
          "crawler"...
          >
          > for whats its worth
          >
          > Mark in VA
          >
          >
          >
          > >
          > > I've heard both ways; some say guineas will sit in front of the
          hives &
          > > catch bees as they come & go. Any idea if it's common or not?
          > >
          > > Lew Best near Waco, TX
          > >
          > > -----Original Message-----
          > > Subject: [Beekeeping] Re:insecticides
          > >
          > > <<snip>> Next year I may have Guinnea Hens to eat the bugs instead.
          > > Good luck!
          > > CA
          > >
          > > _____
          > >
          > > Be a better Globetrotter. HYPERLINK
          > >
          "http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=48254/*http:/answers.yahoo.com/dir/_ylc=X3oD
          > >
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          > klf
          > > MzYwBHNsawNQcm9kdWN0X3F1ZXN0aW9uX3BhZ2U-?link=list&sid=396545469"Get
          > > better travel answers from someone who knows.
          > > Yahoo! Answers - Check it out.
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        • Anne Wheeler
          I work full-time, but I d go out in the early morning when the JB s are still slow and would knock them into soapy water. It s the only non-toxic solution
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 19, 2007
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            I work full-time, but I'd go out in the early morning when the JB's
            are still slow and would knock them into soapy water. It's the only
            non-toxic solution I've found, other than putting netting over
            everything.

            --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "axeman_002000"
            <axeman_002000@...> wrote:
            >
            > I now have 2 hives that I'm keeping in my small back yard. I have a
            > nice vegetable garden in front of the hives, blueberries,
            raspberry's
            > and a few fledling apple trees.
            >
            > The problem I'm having is with Japanese beetles. They pretty much
            > leave my garden alone and I don't mind them munching on the leaves
            of
            > the trees and berry bushes. What really upsets me is when they gang
            > up and devour the fruit of the trees and berry's.
            >
            > I know that SEVIN kills the beetles dead but I've read that it's
            one
            > of the most toxic insecticides to honeybees.
            >
            > To those that pollinate crops: what do the farmers use? What do you
            > personally use in your own yards?
            >
            > I suppose I can spray in the spring for grubs but that does nothing
            > when the neighborhood around me doesn't do that. Short of encasing
            my
            > yard in a big mosquito net with some tubes leading out and directly
            > to the hive for the bees to get in and out I don't know what to do.
            >
            > Thanks for any advice.
            >
            > Alan, Lakeview,NY
            >
          • John B.
            An observation: Here in very dry central Ohio the Japanese beetles seem to be partial to my grape vines and to a few odd weed trees in the back acreage.
            Message 5 of 14 , Jul 21, 2007
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              An observation: Here in very dry central Ohio the Japanese beetles
              seem to be partial to my grape vines and to a few odd weed trees in
              the back acreage. There are very few in my blackberries or
              raspberries, and I suppose I ought to now look more closely at my
              fruit trees. I have taken the position of avoiding spraying
              anything insecticidal around the homestead for about ten years so as
              to experiment with the idea of seeing if natural controls would
              rebound. Sure enough, mantids are quite common here now. It's been
              said that JPs don't have natural predators, but they have been seen
              here as meals for mantids. The mantids in my grape vines are much
              bigger and broader than the mantids that are in the other gardens.

              I have always avoided using Sevin as much as possible, even in an
              orchard that I worked decades ago without bees, because in my book
              it is one of the nastier insecticides. Trapping and catching JPs
              manually has paid off here, and then there is the 'meals for
              mantids' phenomenon- it has a nice, natural ring to it.

              -John



              --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "axeman_002000"
              <axeman_002000@...> wrote:
              >
              > I now have 2 hives that I'm keeping in my small back yard. I have
              a
              > nice vegetable garden in front of the hives, blueberries,
              raspberry's
              > and a few fledling apple trees.
              >
              > The problem I'm having is with Japanese beetles. They pretty much
              > leave my garden alone and I don't mind them munching on the leaves
              of
              > the trees and berry bushes. What really upsets me is when they
              gang
              > up and devour the fruit of the trees and berry's.
              >
              > I know that SEVIN kills the beetles dead but I've read that it's
              one
              > of the most toxic insecticides to honeybees.
              >
              > To those that pollinate crops: what do the farmers use? What do
              you
              > personally use in your own yards?
              >
              > I suppose I can spray in the spring for grubs but that does
              nothing
              > when the neighborhood around me doesn't do that. Short of encasing
              my
              > yard in a big mosquito net with some tubes leading out and
              directly
              > to the hive for the bees to get in and out I don't know what to
              do.
              >
              > Thanks for any advice.
              >
              > Alan, Lakeview,NY
              >
            • axeman axeman
              hmmm... Do mantids eat bees? Alan, Lakeview, NY ... ____________________________________________________________________________________ Sick sense of humor?
              Message 6 of 14 , Jul 23, 2007
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                hmmm...
                Do mantids eat bees?

                Alan, Lakeview, NY

                --- "John B." <jwbees@...> wrote:

                > An observation: Here in very dry central Ohio the
                > Japanese beetles
                > seem to be partial to my grape vines and to a few
                > odd weed trees in
                > the back acreage. There are very few in my
                > blackberries or
                > raspberries, and I suppose I ought to now look more
                > closely at my
                > fruit trees. I have taken the position of avoiding
                > spraying
                > anything insecticidal around the homestead for about
                > ten years so as
                > to experiment with the idea of seeing if natural
                > controls would
                > rebound. Sure enough, mantids are quite common here
                > now. It's been
                > said that JPs don't have natural predators, but they
                > have been seen
                > here as meals for mantids. The mantids in my grape
                > vines are much
                > bigger and broader than the mantids that are in the
                > other gardens.
                >
                > I have always avoided using Sevin as much as
                > possible, even in an
                > orchard that I worked decades ago without bees,
                > because in my book
                > it is one of the nastier insecticides. Trapping and
                > catching JPs
                > manually has paid off here, and then there is the
                > 'meals for
                > mantids' phenomenon- it has a nice, natural ring to
                > it.
                >
                > -John
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "axeman_002000"
                > <axeman_002000@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > I now have 2 hives that I'm keeping in my small
                > back yard. I have
                > a
                > > nice vegetable garden in front of the hives,
                > blueberries,
                > raspberry's
                > > and a few fledling apple trees.
                > >
                > > The problem I'm having is with Japanese beetles.
                > They pretty much
                > > leave my garden alone and I don't mind them
                > munching on the leaves
                > of
                > > the trees and berry bushes. What really upsets me
                > is when they
                > gang
                > > up and devour the fruit of the trees and berry's.
                > >
                > > I know that SEVIN kills the beetles dead but I've
                > read that it's
                > one
                > > of the most toxic insecticides to honeybees.
                > >
                > > To those that pollinate crops: what do the farmers
                > use? What do
                > you
                > > personally use in your own yards?
                > >
                > > I suppose I can spray in the spring for grubs but
                > that does
                > nothing
                > > when the neighborhood around me doesn't do that.
                > Short of encasing
                > my
                > > yard in a big mosquito net with some tubes leading
                > out and
                > directly
                > > to the hive for the bees to get in and out I don't
                > know what to
                > do.
                > >
                > > Thanks for any advice.
                > >
                > > Alan, Lakeview,NY
                > >
                >
                >
                >




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              • John B.
                I haven t seen it yet, but they do come across as a hungry opportunists. Definitely have not seen them hanging around hive openings, so they have that
                Message 7 of 14 , Jul 23, 2007
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                  I haven't seen it yet, but they do come across as a hungry
                  opportunists. Definitely have not seen them hanging around hive
                  openings, so they have that advantage over guinea hens.

                  John

                  --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, axeman axeman <axeman_002000@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > hmmm...
                  > Do mantids eat bees?
                  >
                  > Alan, Lakeview, NY
                  >
                • David Browder
                  Seen it happen more than once. First time it was off to the side, waiting. Grabbed a guard bee as she went by. Any I see hanging round my hives gets its head
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jul 23, 2007
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                    Seen it happen more than once. First time it was off to the side, waiting. Grabbed a guard bee as she went by.  Any I see hanging round my hives gets its head tore of.  I've always wondered whether they ate around the stinger and poison sac, spit it out, or digested it.
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: John B
                    Sent: Monday, July 23, 2007 5:32 PM
                    Subject: [Beekeeping] Re: insecticides

                    I haven't seen it yet, but they do come across as a hungry
                    opportunists. Definitely have not seen them hanging around hive
                    openings, so they have that advantage over guinea hens.

                    John

                    --- In beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com, axeman axeman <axeman_002000@ ...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > hmmm...
                    > Do mantids eat bees?
                    >
                    > Alan, Lakeview, NY
                    >

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