Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Laying Workers?

Expand Messages
  • Joseph A. Clark
    I m experiencing the same problem, and I checked all 3 of my new hives and found queens in 2 of them. Now, on the third hive, I carefully moved each frame,
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm experiencing the same problem, and I checked all 3 of my new
      hives and found queens in 2 of them. Now, on the third hive, I
      carefully moved each frame, lifted them out one by one, and looked
      all over for "Mama", but couldn't find her. I slid the frames along
      the rabbets on the hive body, thinking maybe she was crawling around
      on the sides, but still didn't find her. I did notice one worker
      with her abdomen in a cell, but when she moved, I didn't see an egg
      there.

      So, my question is, if I find a viable "occupied" queen cell in
      another colony, can I shake the bees off that frame and transfer it
      to the queenless colony? I realize that anything involving queens is
      a risk we accept, but I wonder if maybe this would be a way to
      approach it without having to get a new queen from a breeder.

      Thanks all.

      Joe
      --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "mstmechanix" <mstmechanix@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Scott Townsend" <jtst@> wrote:
      > >
      > > So one of our Hives had has had issues since we brought home the
      > > nuc. We could not find the queen and there was a Queen Cell on
      > one
      > > of the frames. We waited a few weeks and nothing seemed to
      > indicate
      > > there was a Queen. Then we noticed several eggs and pearl. So we
      > > thought we were in good shape. Now there does not seem to be
      any
      > > foragers, the entrance of the hive is pretty vacant compared to
      > the
      > > other hive. There are only 4 or so frames that have comb and
      not
      > > all of them are filly extruded. What comb does have stuff in it
      is
      > > mostly Honey and pollen at this point.
      > >
      > > We were thinking that maybe the Eggs and pearl we saw could have
      > been
      > > from a Laying worker? How can I be sure?
      > >
      > > If so My plan is going to be:
      > > Get new queen
      > > Take hive body 100 yards away
      > > remove all bees from all frames
      > > Replace frames in Hive body
      > > Place Good hive in its new location
      > > (10' away, was going to do this next weekend anyway)
      > > Move Base of hive to location where good hive was.
      > > (2' away from old location)
      > > Place hive body with frames and queen on base
      > >
      > > So if there are any laying workers, they will be stranded 100
      > yards
      > > away. Any foragers would know their way home and go back to the
      > hive,
      > > though its 2' from its old location should find it. Some foragers
      > > from the good hive will go to the old hive location (now the hive
      > > that has a new queen) and switch colonies.
      > >
      > > The good hive has 7 or so frames that are loaded with Honey,
      Brood
      > > and Pearl. Should I help the hive in need by adding one of the
      > brood
      > > Frames, minus the bees, to the hive in need?
      > >
      > > Suggestions, Comments?
      > >
      > > Scott<-
      > >
      > Scott Just got done reading your message. Experienced same
      > problem used the same solution. Installed
      >
      > the new queen box and waited 6 days for her to be released.It was
      > if the workers had no interest in her. After a while I just helped
      > her out . This was 3 weeks ago. This hive is going nowhere. It
      > rejected the new queen, after installing the bees in early April I
      > just have 5 racks of comb and what brood cells there are is mostly
      > drone. I hope you have better luck but it did not ork for me.
      >
    • tom langley
      If it is truly a laying worker it will kill the new queen...but You can move the current hive and replace it with a vacant one. Then take the laying worker
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
         If it is truly a laying worker it will kill the new queen...but
        You can move the current hive and replace it with a vacant one.
        Then take  the laying worker hive a few feet away from the original
        spot, the laying worker won't leave the original hive but the  worker bees
        will return to the new hive which you can add your queen cell or a frame
        of brood in  various stages to. It worked for me this spring and I was
        pleased that I did not lose the colony and it is doing good now. There may
        be easier ways but this  is all I know about.
        Tom

        "Joseph A. Clark" <josephaclark@...> wrote:
        I'm experiencing the same problem, and I checked all 3 of my new
        hives and found queens in 2 of them. Now, on the third hive, I
        carefully moved each frame, lifted them out one by one, and looked
        all over for "Mama", but couldn't find her. I slid the frames along
        the rabbets on the hive body, thinking maybe she was crawling around
        on the sides, but still didn't find her. I did notice one worker
        with her abdomen in a cell, but when she moved, I didn't see an egg
        there.

        So, my question is, if I find a viable "occupied" queen cell in
        another colony, can I shake the bees off that frame and transfer it
        to the queenless colony? I realize that anything involving queens is
        a risk we accept, but I wonder if maybe this would be a way to
        approach it without having to get a new queen from a breeder.

        Thanks all.

        Joe
        --- In beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com, "mstmechanix" <mstmechanix@ ...>
        wrote:
        >
        > --- In beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com, "Scott Townsend" <jtst@> wrote:
        > >
        > > So one of our Hives had has had issues since we brought home the
        > > nuc. We could not find the queen and there was a Queen Cell on
        > one
        > > of the frames. We waited a few weeks and nothing seemed to
        > indicate
        > > there was a Queen. Then we noticed several eggs and pearl. So we
        > > thought we were in good shape. Now there does not seem to be
        any
        > > foragers, the entrance of the hive is pretty vacant compared to
        > the
        > > other hive. There are only 4 or so frames that have comb and
        not
        > > all of them are filly extruded. What comb does have stuff in it
        is
        > > mostly Honey and pollen at this point.
        > >
        > > We were thinking that maybe the Eggs and pearl we saw could have
        > been
        > > from a Laying worker? How can I be sure?
        > >
        > > If so My plan is going to be:
        > > Get new queen
        > > Take hive body 100 yards away
        > > remove all bees from all frames
        > > Replace frames in Hive body
        > > Place Good hive in its new location
        > > (10' away, was going to do this next weekend anyway)
        > > Move Base of hive to location where good hive was.
        > > (2' away from old location)
        > > Place hive body with frames and queen on base
        > >
        > > So if there are any laying workers, they will be stranded 100
        > yards
        > > away. Any foragers would know their way home and go back to the
        > hive,
        > > though its 2' from its old location should find it. Some foragers
        > > from the good hive will go to the old hive location (now the hive
        > > that has a new queen) and switch colonies.
        > >
        > > The good hive has 7 or so frames that are loaded with Honey,
        Brood
        > > and Pearl. Should I help the hive in need by adding one of the
        > brood
        > > Frames, minus the bees, to the hive in need?
        > >
        > > Suggestions, Comments?
        > >
        > > Scott<-
        > >
        > Scott Just got done reading your message. Experienced same
        > problem used the same solution. Installed
        >
        > the new queen box and waited 6 days for her to be released.It was
        > if the workers had no interest in her. After a while I just helped
        > her out . This was 3 weeks ago. This hive is going nowhere. It
        > rejected the new queen, after installing the bees in early April I
        > just have 5 racks of comb and what brood cells there are is mostly
        > drone. I hope you have better luck but it did not ork for me.
        >



        Take the Internet to Go: Yahoo!Go puts the Internet in your pocket: mail, news, photos & more.

      • Joseph A. Clark
        Thanks, Tom. I ll give it a shot to see if it works. Hopefully, the problem will solve itself then. ... worker bees ... frame ... was ... There may
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks, Tom. I'll give it a shot to see if it works. Hopefully, the
          problem will solve itself then.

          --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, tom langley <bruthagrizz@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > If it is truly a laying worker it will kill the new queen...but
          > You can move the current hive and replace it with a vacant one.
          > Then take the laying worker hive a few feet away from the original
          > spot, the laying worker won't leave the original hive but the
          worker bees
          > will return to the new hive which you can add your queen cell or a
          frame
          > of brood in various stages to. It worked for me this spring and I
          was
          > pleased that I did not lose the colony and it is doing good now.
          There may
          > be easier ways but this is all I know about.
          > Tom
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.