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Re: Queen cells :S

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  • mrbeeva
    It s hard to say, usually cells on the dace are signs of supercedure. But eggs in those and the one at the bottom may suggest a swarming impulse. Try moving
    Message 1 of 7 , May 7, 2007
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      It's hard to say, usually cells on the dace are signs of supercedure.
      But eggs in those and the one at the bottom may suggest a swarming
      impulse. Try moving some of the foundation frames next to the brood
      area. Eliminate ALL queens cell and check in a few days. Maybe the new
      queen does not want to stay with you; I have had new queens in newly
      started hives take off with a swarm. You will BEE surprised a the
      different things bees will do, contrary to all the publications that
      man has written. They are after all wild animals and behave at their
      whim. And they don't read the same books we do. Even the 10 frame
      boxes we stuff them in are not there natural preference. They seem
      just to accommodate us, usually to their own peril.

      I've kept bees since 1980 and still am amazed at the "new" things I
      discover about them. Fascinating little creatures. Observe and enjoy !!

      Ken





      --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "mcconja" <bearlc@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi there,
      >
      > A few weeks ago I received a split from a friend. We put a new queen
      > in and she was accepted. She has been laying well with no signs of
      > problems. A week ago I noticed a couple queen cups in the hive so I
      > cut them out and added the second hive body (even though there is
      > still 4 frames they haven't drawn out in the 1st story). Yesterday I
      > found 3-4 more queen cells with eggs in them on the face of the frame
      > and one near the bottom of the frame. I removed all of them. The
      > bees have yet to go to the top box which is mostly drawn empty comb.
      > I have also been feeding them 1:1 syrup and they are packing it away
      > at a rate of a gallon every 4-5 days. The weather has been lousy and
      > they have not had many flying days.
      >
      > I wonder if they have too much honey stored around the brood nest.
      > At this time there are about 5 full frames of bees so it's not bee
      > congestion. The only thing i could think of is they are nectar bound.
      >
      > At this point what should I do? Should I seed the brood nest with a
      > couple empty drawn frames?
      >
      > What would you suggest?
      >
      > Thank you in advance!
      >
      > Joe
      >
    • mrbeeva
      PS - Healthy hives will usually always have cell cups on the bottom of the frames, especially early in spring. But never will the queen lay in them unless
      Message 2 of 7 , May 7, 2007
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        PS - Healthy hives will usually always have cell cups on the bottom of
        the frames, especially early in spring. But never will the queen lay
        in them unless there is an urge to swarm. I just glance at them for
        signs if eggs or larva, indicating they want to leave. Trying to keep
        those unused cells cleared is a futile effort; they will re-construct
        new ones in a couple days. On a fast check I just tilt the hive body
        back where it sita and glean for eggs or larva. If none -- all is well.
        Ken
        --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "mcconja" <bearlc@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi there,
        >
        > A few weeks ago I received a split from a friend. We put a new queen
        > in and she was accepted. She has been laying well with no signs of
        > problems. A week ago I noticed a couple queen cups in the hive so I
        > cut them out and added the second hive body (even though there is
        > still 4 frames they haven't drawn out in the 1st story). Yesterday I
        > found 3-4 more queen cells with eggs in them on the face of the frame
        > and one near the bottom of the frame. I removed all of them. The
        > bees have yet to go to the top box which is mostly drawn empty comb.
        > I have also been feeding them 1:1 syrup and they are packing it away
        > at a rate of a gallon every 4-5 days. The weather has been lousy and
        > they have not had many flying days.
        >
        > I wonder if they have too much honey stored around the brood nest.
        > At this time there are about 5 full frames of bees so it's not bee
        > congestion. The only thing i could think of is they are nectar bound.
        >
        > At this point what should I do? Should I seed the brood nest with a
        > couple empty drawn frames?
        >
        > What would you suggest?
        >
        > Thank you in advance!
        >
        > Joe
        >
      • Mike Stoops
        mcconja wrote: A few weeks ago I received a split from a friend. We put a new queen in and she was
        Message 3 of 7 , May 7, 2007
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          mcconja <bearlc@...> wrote:
          A few weeks ago I received a split from a friend. We put a new queen
          in and she was accepted. She has been laying well with no signs of
          problems. A week ago I noticed a couple queen cups ......    Yesterday I
          found 3-4 more queen cells with eggs in them on the face of the frame
          and one near the bottom of the frame. ............
          At this point what should I do? Should I seed the brood nest with a
          couple empty drawn frames?
          I learned a new term last week:  checkerboarding.  It refers to the procedure of inserting frames of foundation between frames of brood.  How many you insert is dependent upon the colony's bees' capability of taking care of the expanded brood nest area.  This means that if you have  a strong colony you could insert three or four frames of foundation between frames of brood.  The frames you replace (at the sides) can be placed in the second brood chamber in the middle above the brood.  This would force the bees to work more to take care of the expanded brood nest, give the queen more room to lay, and to encourage the bees to move up into the second brood chamber.  From what I have read, this produces some boomer hives.

          A thought for what it is worth.

          Mike in LA


          Ahhh...imagining that irresistible "new car" smell?
          Check out new cars at Yahoo! Autos.

        • Kalia Kliban
          ... This seems like it ought to work, but I keep hearing that it s a bad idea to break up the brood cluster. Is that only in the winter? Kalia
          Message 4 of 7 , May 7, 2007
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            Mike Stoops wrote:

            > I learned a new term last week: checkerboarding. It refers to the
            > procedure of inserting frames of foundation between frames of
            > brood. This
            > means that if you have a strong colony you could insert three or
            > four frames of foundation between frames of brood.

            This seems like it ought to work, but I keep hearing that it's a bad idea
            to break up the brood cluster. Is that only in the winter?

            Kalia
          • Mike Stoops
            ... This seems like it ought to work, but I keep hearing that it s a bad idea to break up the brood cluster. Is that only in the winter? __ It can be a bad
            Message 5 of 7 , May 8, 2007
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              Kalia Kliban <kalia@...> wrote:
              Mike Stoops wrote:

              >  checkerboarding. It refers to the procedure of inserting frames of foundation between frames of brood. 
              This seems like it ought to work, but I keep hearing that it's a bad idea
              to break up the brood cluster. Is that only in the winter?
              __
              It can be a bad idea at any time.  You have to judge the strength of your colony.  When you have a strong colony, where you have the volume of bees to care for an expanded brood nest, you can checkerboard.  If not, don't.  That also means covering adequately during low temps at night.  When you see occupied swarm cells, you generally too late to make much of a positive impact on the colony.

              Mike in LA


              Ahhh...imagining that irresistible "new car" smell?
              Check out new cars at Yahoo! Autos.
            • MSP
              I use this method to control swarming It works. Although you have to be confident there isn t a cold weather snap around the corner. The outcome will be either
              Message 6 of 7 , May 26, 2007
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                I use this method to control swarming It works. Although you have to be confident there isn’t a cold weather snap around the corner.

                The outcome will be either the frames of brood at the top our the</

                (Message over 64 KB, truncated)

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