Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [beekeeping] RE: Do you charge to get swarms?

Expand Messages
  • tom langley
    My first removal was an extraction from the outside wall of an old Victorian house. The entrance hole was about 15 feet up so I began to remove the old
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 4, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
        My first removal was an extraction from the outside wall
      of an old Victorian house. The entrance hole was about
      15 feet up so I began to remove the old asbestos siding
      panels only to find wooden siding underneath. The comb
      was about 5 rows wide and it went down at least 8 feet.
      It was the most awesome thing I had ever seen but it was
      also one of the hardest things I had ever done. It took me
      and my dad 3 days after work (total 8-10 hours)to get it all done
      and the house somewhat back in order. Unfortunately I had
      agreed to do it for free. It was worth it for the experience and
      all the honey though. But now I don't do it for free any more.
      I charge anywhere from $0.00 - ???? depending on the
      difficulty of the task. Average price is probably $50.00.
      It's always a great experience though.
      Tom

      Mike Gillmore <HMA@...> wrote:
      David,
       
      When capturing a swarm you are spending your own "time" and "gas money" to remove it from someones property. Usually they want to see it removed as much, or more, than you would like it to be added to your collection.
       
      When taking a swarm call I will first question them very carefully to make sure it actually is a "honeybee" swarm before wasting time and money only to discover a wasp or hornet nest when arriving at the site. When getting around to discussing charges I let them know that I am not an "exterminator" , who may charge $75-$100 to come out and kill them. I explain that I do not "charge" for removing them live, but will accept a "donation" for the effort to cover my costs. Most rational people will cough up $20-$25 for your service and feel that it was money well spent. This will cover your expenses plus you get a free package.
       
      I don't worry too much about getting money for capturing swarms.. some I get nothing, others more than $25. It usually ends up being a very enjoyable experience for myself and the people involved, either way.
       
      I don't do extractions, so someone else can respond to that part of your question.
       
      Mike
       
      >> I am a hobbyist beekeeper. I've picked up a number of easy swarms at no
      cost. I've also picked up a bald-faced hornet nest for $35. (It was
      really easy!) I've heard some hobbyist beekeepers say that they always
      charge.

      Do you get swarms? Do you charge? How much for an easy swarm? How about
      for something more challenging, like in a wall?


      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
      http://mail.yahoo.com

    • Dan&jan
      Check your State laws before you work for a pest control outfit for any certification you may need. Dan Veilleux in the mountains of NC zone 6a
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 5, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Check your State laws before you work for a pest control outfit for any
        certification you may need.

        Dan Veilleux
        in the mountains of NC
        zone 6a
      • David O.
        Yes, Mike, I agree that a thorough questioning is always in order: - Where are the bees? - Are they inside of something? - How long have they been there? - How
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 5, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Yes, Mike, I agree that a thorough questioning is always in order:

          - Where are the bees?
          - Are they inside of something?
          - How long have they been there?
          - How high off the ground are they?
          - What size is the cluster?
          - Why do you think they are honey bees? (Listen carefully.)
          - (If on a branch:) May I cut the branch?

          You can think of many other good questions. My biggest surprise came
          when an apparently easy so-called swarm was just 4 feet off the
          ground in a privet hedge next to a driveway. The man said that he had
          just noticed them.

          It wasn't until quite a bit of smoke and a sting that I found
          underneath all those bees was a good 12 square inches of new comb.
          They had started setting up house, and did NOT want to leave! Sadly,
          I lost the queen with that one, and had to combine them with an
          existing colony.

          --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Gillmore" <HMA@...> wrote:
          >
          > David,
          >
          > When capturing a swarm you are spending your own "time" and "gas
          money" to remove it from someones property. Usually they want to see
          it removed as much, or more, than you would like it to be added to
          your collection.
          >
          > When taking a swarm call I will first question them very carefully
          to make sure it actually is a "honeybee" swarm before wasting time
          and money only to discover a wasp or hornet nest when arriving at the
          site. When getting around to discussing charges I let them know that
          I am not an "exterminator", who may charge $75-$100 to come out and
          kill them. I explain that I do not "charge" for removing them live,
          but will accept a "donation" for the effort to cover my costs. Most
          rational people will cough up $20-$25 for your service and feel that
          it was money well spent. This will cover your expenses plus you get a
          free package.
          >
          > I don't worry too much about getting money for capturing swarms..
          some I get nothing, others more than $25. It usually ends up being a
          very enjoyable experience for myself and the people involved, either
          way.
          >
          > I don't do extractions, so someone else can respond to that part of
          your question.
          >
          > Mike
          >
          > >> I am a hobbyist beekeeper. I've picked up a number of easy
          swarms at no
          > cost. I've also picked up a bald-faced hornet nest for $35. (It was
          > really easy!) I've heard some hobbyist beekeepers say that they
          always
          > charge.
          >
          > Do you get swarms? Do you charge? How much for an easy swarm? How
          about
          > for something more challenging, like in a wall?
          >
        • Dan&jan
          ... One way to cover your costs is to require a minimum consultation donation of ~ $ 25 for a visit PLUS a removal fee. I would isolate any swarm in a separate
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 5, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            >>When taking a swarm call I will first question them very carefully to make sure it actually is a "honeybee" swarm before wasting time and money only to discover a wasp or hornet nest <<
             
            One way to cover your costs is to require a minimum consultation donation of ~ $ 25 for a visit PLUS a removal fee.
             
            I would isolate any swarm in a separate yard to ensure freedom from foulbrood.
             
            Dan Veilleux
            in the mountains of NC
            zone 6a
          • Scot Mc Pherson
            Foul is not a concern with swarms. One of the very successful ways to treat for foul is to shake the infected colony into fresh equipment. However, it being
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 5, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Foul is not a concern with swarms. One of the very successful ways to "treat" for foul is to shake the infected colony into fresh equipment. However, it being chem free, it is still a treatment (or therapy), and therefore a form of crutch.
               
              I think foul infected colonies should be allowed to run their course on their own or manually destroyed. If the colony (and much of the yard) dies, you are blessed by their removal from the gene pool. The ones that aren't susceptible or succeed and survive the infection are worthy contributions to the gene pool. Susceptibility to foul is a weakness, and not to be tolerated.
               
              Stress (disease, drought, pestilence, climate) is the only way to discover weaknesses. You can help by quickly culling the weak preventing further propogation of the specific weakness, or you can let nature take its course and allow some of the good factors to remain included in the pool while nature more slowly works the weakness out.
               
              This is literally how varroa became strong enough to not only be virtually uneffected by chemical treatments, but actually become somewhat dependent on a chemical for ideal conditions. We placed stresses on the varroa until the weakness to the chemicals used were nearly wiped out of the gene pool.
               
              If you want to be a successful beekeeper, you need to understand this principle. Just because a beekeeper has 1000 colonies doesn't mean he/she is successful. I can unsuccessfully maintain 1000 colonies and keep loosing most of them only to purchase replacements. This is not beekeeping success, this is failing....Sustaining your numbers without population inputs, and generating a sustainable income is successful beekeeping.
               
              Scot McPherson
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.