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Re: [beekeeping] Request for guidance on selling a hive

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  • Rich
    Heck, why not delivery? I have heard of some people paying as much as $400 for hives. For that price I think I would rent/buy a truck and do hive delivery.
    Message 1 of 18 , Sep 13, 2006
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      Heck, why not delivery? I have heard of some people paying as much as $400 for hives. For that price I think I would rent/buy a truck and do hive delivery.

      Rich
      ---- Darcy Holleman <gardenbeez@...> wrote:
      > Do you deliver to NH? LOL
      >
      > David Browder <davidbrowder@...> wrote: From the September North Carolina Agricultural Review "Classifieds",,,,,,20 new beehives w/excellent honey producing bees, $110/ea,
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: jtnbb
      > To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 3:32 PM
      > Subject: [beekeeping] Request for guidance on selling a hive
      >
      >
      > I have an established hive, pretty well mite free as well, that I am
      > interested in offering for sale.
      >
      > I am posting here as much to get some feedback as to make the listing
      > known. What would an established hive with two deeps full of honey
      > and brood go for? The woodenware, foundation, and a package of bees
      > (obviously far fewer bees than are in there now) would be at least
      > $150. I imagine the established hive with brood and honey and bees
      > and all would be worth more than $200... Would the price of a nuc be
      > any guide? What does a nuc cost? Any thoughts anyone? Anyone
      > interested?
      >
      > I can be reached at j_boulware@... or on cell 203-500-3404. I
      > will be going away from Sept 17 through Oct 5th, but will respond to
      > any interest around those times. The hive is in southern Connecticut.
      >
      > Thanks for any ideas anyone may have.
      >
      > Jtnb
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ---------------------------------
      > Do you Yahoo!?
      > Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.
    • Rich
      Is that to say that what you can get is not fair? Or that it is not fair to get what you can? I m just not quite sure which way to interpret what you are
      Message 2 of 18 , Sep 14, 2006
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        Is that to say that what you can get is not fair? Or that it is not fair to get what you can? I'm just not quite sure which way to interpret what you are tralking abuot.

        ---- Scot Mc Pherson <scot.mcpherson@...> wrote:
        > I was tralking abuot what is fair, not what you can get, and that's why
        > I said what I said, the whole message.
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Scot McPherson
        > The McPherson Family Honey Farms
        > Davenport, Iowa USA
        > http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org
        > <http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org/>
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/groups/OrganicBeekeepers/
        > mailto:scot.mcpherson@...
        >
        > . ` , ` '
        > .,';`,. ``. '.
        > _/^\_ :;.,';`'.,` `., ' '`,
        > /_____\ .:.,"'`
        > /\_____/\ .,:`'"
        > \###/.,';`
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On
        > Behalf Of Rich
        > Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2006 3:50 AM
        > To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: RE: [beekeeping] Request for guidance on selling a hive
        >
        >
        >
        > $400 for a hive?! Wow, I think I need to move to your neighborhood and
        > make a nice living just selling hives full time.
        >
        > Rich
        > ---- Scot Mc Pherson <scot.mcpherson@
        > <mailto:scot.mcpherson%40gmail.com> gmail.com> wrote:
        > > A fair price would be about $400 for a mature colony, however you will
        > > be lucky to get $200 unless you know a new beekeeper really wanting
        > your
        > > equipment.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --
        > > Scot McPherson
        > > The McPherson Family Honey Farms
        > > Davenport, Iowa USA
        > > http://beewiki. <http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org>
        > linuxfromscratch.org
        > > <http://beewiki. <http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org/>
        > linuxfromscratch.org/>
        > > http://groups. <http://groups.yahoo.com/groups/OrganicBeekeepers/>
        > yahoo.com/groups/OrganicBeekeepers/
        > > mailto:scot.mcpherson@ <mailto:scot.mcpherson%40gmail.com> gmail.com
        > >
        > > . ` , ` '
        > > .,';`,. ``. '.
        > > _/^\_ :;.,';`'.,` `., ' '`,
        > > /_____\ .:.,"'`
        > > /\_____/\ .,:`'"
        > > \###/.,';`
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: beekeeping@yahoogro <mailto:beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com>
        > ups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogro
        > <mailto:beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com> ups.com] On
        > > Behalf Of jtnbb
        > > Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 5:32 PM
        > > To: beekeeping@yahoogro <mailto:beekeeping%40yahoogroups.com> ups.com
        > > Subject: [beekeeping] Request for guidance on selling a hive
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I have an established hive, pretty well mite free as well, that I am
        > > interested in offering for sale.
        > >
        > > I am posting here as much to get some feedback as to make the listing
        > > known. What would an established hive with two deeps full of honey
        > > and brood go for? The woodenware, foundation, and a package of bees
        > > (obviously far fewer bees than are in there now) would be at least
        > > $150. I imagine the established hive with brood and honey and bees
        > > and all would be worth more than $200... Would the price of a nuc be
        > > any guide? What does a nuc cost? Any thoughts anyone? Anyone
        > > interested?
        > >
        > > I can be reached at j_boulware@hotmail.
        > > <mailto:j_boulware%40hotmail.com> com or on cell 203-500-3404. I
        > > will be going away from Sept 17 through Oct 5th, but will respond to
        > > any interest around those times. The hive is in southern Connecticut.
        > >
        > > Thanks for any ideas anyone may have.
        > >
        > > Jtnb
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Mike Stoops
        Rich wrote: Is that to say that what you can get is not fair? Or that it is not fair to get what you can?
        Message 3 of 18 , Sep 14, 2006
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          Rich <wd6esz@...> wrote:
          Is that to say that what you can get is not fair? Or that it is not fair to get what you can?

          Sometime what you can get isn't as much as what might be consider as being fair.  A friend of mine and I bought somewhere around 80 hives several years ago.  They had a screened bottom board, a hive body, a super, a queen excluder, and migratory tops.  Just about all the hives were if pretty good shape.   We paid $75.00 a piece for them.  Was that fair?  It's what the beekeeper was asking.  We've not been disappointed with the bees since.

          Mike in LA


          Stay in the know. Pulse on the new Yahoo.com. Check it out.

        • Tim Arheit
          ... I ve rarely seen a hive sell for what it s really worth. Given the price of an assembled double deep hive (about 115 plus shipping from Mann lake), paint,
          Message 4 of 18 , Sep 14, 2006
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            At 08:17 AM 9/14/2006, you wrote:
            Rich <wd6esz@...> wrote:
            Is that to say that what you can get is not fair? Or that it is not fair to get what you can?
            Sometime what you can get isn't as much as what might be consider as being fair.

            I've rarely seen a hive sell for what it's really worth.  Given the price of an assembled double deep hive (about 115 plus shipping from Mann lake), paint, the cost of a package of bees ($50 to 70 plus shipping), the cost of feeding to get them to draw out 20 frames and build up to strength, and $200 would only cover your costs.

            But, in practice they sell for much less.  In 2000 there were two auctions in my area, one with 100 hives, the other with 600 hives (enough to bring out some bigger buyers),  The average selling price was $50.  The equipment was in rough, but serviceable condition and should have lasted another 5 years, but at $50 you couldn't buy a nuc and it was comparable to a package price.

            In 2002 there was another auction of about 100 hives, these went for about $110 on average.  The equipment was in similar condition to the auction in 2000, but the hives weren't as strong in my opinion. 

            In 2005 a local beekeeper was getting out of the business and was offering his hives for $75 (again in rough condition, but very strong hives).  If I had the money I probably should have purchased them all and made nucs for sale as nucs sell for $75-$90 in my area in a cardboard nuc box.

            $100 to $150 per hive is probably what you'll see in the bee journal.  Sometimes with relatively new equipment.  Of course these guys didn't pay $70 for a single deep hive from mann lake (without bees), but purchased in bulk from cheaper dealers or made some of it themselves.]

            None of it seems to make much sense to me, with nucs going for as high as $110 from one person I know of, and full hives that at least are periodically available for less than that.

            -Tim



          • Rich
            Then would it be fair to say that there is no fair or unfair, but simply what the market will bare?
            Message 5 of 18 , Sep 14, 2006
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              Then would it be fair to say that there is no fair or unfair, but simply what the market will bare?

              ---- Mike Stoops <mws1112004@...> wrote:
              > Rich <wd6esz@...> wrote: Is that to say that what you can get is not fair? Or that it is not fair to get what you can?
              >
              > Sometime what you can get isn't as much as what might be consider as being fair. A friend of mine and I bought somewhere around 80 hives several years ago. They had a screened bottom board, a hive body, a super, a queen excluder, and migratory tops. Just about all the hives were if pretty good shape. We paid $75.00 a piece for them. Was that fair? It's what the beekeeper was asking. We've not been disappointed with the bees since.
              >
              >
              > Mike in LA
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Stay in the know. Pulse on the new Yahoo.com. Check it out.
            • Rich
              Sort of like a CD single. Though smaller with less material cost, it ends up being more expensive because of volume of numbers.
              Message 6 of 18 , Sep 14, 2006
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                Sort of like a CD single. Though smaller with less material cost, it ends up being more expensive because of volume of numbers.

                ---- Tim Arheit <tarheit@...> wrote:
                > At 08:17 AM 9/14/2006, you wrote:
                > >Rich <wd6esz@...> wrote:
                > >Is that to say that what you can get is not fair? Or that it is not fair to get what you can?
                > >Sometime what you can get isn't as much as what might be consider as being fair.
                >
                > I've rarely seen a hive sell for what it's really worth. Given the price of an assembled double deep hive (about 115 plus shipping from Mann lake), paint, the cost of a package of bees ($50 to 70 plus shipping), the cost of feeding to get them to draw out 20 frames and build up to strength, and $200 would only cover your costs.
                >
                > But, in practice they sell for much less. In 2000 there were two auctions in my area, one with 100 hives, the other with 600 hives (enough to bring out some bigger buyers), The average selling price was $50. The equipment was in rough, but serviceable condition and should have lasted another 5 years, but at $50 you couldn't buy a nuc and it was comparable to a package price.
                >
                > In 2002 there was another auction of about 100 hives, these went for about $110 on average. The equipment was in similar condition to the auction in 2000, but the hives weren't as strong in my opinion.
                >
                > In 2005 a local beekeeper was getting out of the business and was offering his hives for $75 (again in rough condition, but very strong hives). If I had the money I probably should have purchased them all and made nucs for sale as nucs sell for $75-$90 in my area in a cardboard nuc box.
                >
                > $100 to $150 per hive is probably what you'll see in the bee journal. Sometimes with relatively new equipment. Of course these guys didn't pay $70 for a single deep hive from mann lake (without bees), but purchased in bulk from cheaper dealers or made some of it themselves.]
                >
                > None of it seems to make much sense to me, with nucs going for as high as $110 from one person I know of, and full hives that at least are periodically available for less than that.
                >
                > -Tim
                >
                >
                >
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