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Re: [beekeeping] no activity in super

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  • M Nist
    It all depends on whether you are having a dearth (lack) of flow right now. If the bees have nothing to store, they won t be inclined to draw out comb. Why did
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 7, 2006
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      It all depends on whether you are having a dearth (lack) of flow right
      now. If the bees have nothing to store, they won't be inclined to draw
      out comb.

      Why did you put a queen excluder on there? my mentor calls them
      "honey excluders" because he believes that discouraging the queen from
      going up there also discouraged the bees from using that space.

      Just a thought.

      --Madeleine in NJ

      Monday, August 7, 2006, 3:08:33 PM, you wrote:

      > The bees in my hive had fully drawn two hive bodies and I put a
      > honey super on top, over a queen excluder. After about 8-10 days, I
      > checked the super and though there were bees all over it, none of the
      > (all wax) foundation has been drawn. The hive bodies have plastic
      > foundation covered with wax.

      > The hive still looks fine, lots of brood and capped honey, etc.,
      > but nothing up top. Am I being impatient?

      > Stefani





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    • Mike Stoops
      Stefani Leto wrote: The bees in my hive had fully drawn two hive bodies and I put a honey super on
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 7, 2006
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        Stefani Leto <parkdayknitter@...> wrote:
        The bees in my hive had fully drawn two hive bodies and I put a honey super on top, over a queen excluder. After about 8-10 days, I checked the super and though there were bees all over it, none of the (all wax) foundation has been drawn.


        Stefani,
            You might try taking the queen excluder off for about a week or so to get the bees up and started in your super.  After a week, put your excluder back in if the bees have started drawing the comb and storing honey in the frames.  Check for eggs.  If you see them, the queen is up there and laying.  Find her and move her back down into the lower hive bodies, place your excluder on, and then see how the bees do in drawing out the frames in the super.  The eggs that have been laid will hatch out in 21 days and the bees will start filling in those portions of comb with honey. 
            If you don't see any eggs, place your excluder on then the super.  Check a week later to see if the queen is above or below the excluder and to see if the bees are continuing to work the super.
            Some beekeepers swear by the excluders, other swear at them.  Sometimes with plain foundation you have to let the bees start drawing out the frames and storing honey before you insert the excluder.

        Mike in LA


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      • trevor mansell
        Stefani I would not recomend removing the excluder. Since you have 100% beeswax foundation ,if the queen lays any eggs in the super the wax moths will destroy
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 7, 2006
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          Stefani
          I would not recomend removing the excluder. Since you
          have 100% beeswax foundation ,if the queen lays any
          eggs in the super the wax moths will destroy the area
          as soon as the super is removed and extracted. The
          queen excluder will not stop the bees from drawing wax
          out. Other things may ,if the bees have mites they
          wont be healthy enough to produce wax. If the honey
          flow is not strong enough then the bees wont draw wax.

          Check the brood nest to make sure the bees are not
          plugging themselves with honey. As long as the queen
          has room to lay eggs then they should be ok. If they
          dont have enough room you can remove the frames and
          either extract them. Or you can replace them with flat
          foundation and place the honey filled frames in a deep
          box over the excluder.

          Trevor

          --- Stefani Leto <parkdayknitter@...> wrote:

          > The bees in my hive had fully drawn two hive bodies
          > and I put a honey super on top, over a queen
          > excluder. After about 8-10 days, I checked the super
          > and though there were bees all over it, none of the
          > (all wax) foundation has been drawn. The hive bodies
          > have plastic foundation covered with wax.
          >
          > The hive still looks fine, lots of brood and capped
          > honey, etc., but nothing up top. Am I being
          > impatient?
          >
          > Stefani
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls
          > to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2¢/min or less.


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        • Shanta McBain
          ... Foundation in the honey box, except in a assume flow is not too attractive to the bees. They will not move up unless they run out of room in the hive area.
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 7, 2006
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            Quoting Stefani Leto <parkdayknitter@...>:

            > The bees in my hive had fully drawn two hive bodies and I put a
            > honey super on top, over a queen excluder. After about 8-10 days, I
            > checked the super and though there were bees all over it, none of
            > the (all wax) foundation has been drawn. The hive bodies have
            > plastic foundation covered with wax.

            Foundation in the honey box, except in a assume flow is not too
            attractive to the bees. They will not move up unless they run out of
            room in the hive area. They will fill the second box with honey before
            moving up. To get around this you can take two young brood from the
            lower box and ''bait' the honey box. Put the two foundation that you
            removed from the honey box in the outside or second from the outside
            position on each side of the top box. They will fill this with honey
            rather than brood so you can swap back the brood frames you moved up.

            > The hive still looks fine, lots of brood and capped honey, etc., but
            > nothing up top. Am I being impatient?

            Maybe maybe not. If there is no flow happening right now they will not
            move into it until they have a need. You can see this by how much they
            are filling the top brood box with honey. If herself is being forced
            into the bottom box and all the open cells in the top box are being
            filled with honey you will need to bait them up.

            Thanks

            Shanta McBain

            http://ecf.beemaster.ca
          • Shanta McBain
            ... This is not my experience nor my mentors. Although inferior stock will not go through most good stock will. It is also a complication that a beginner dose
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 7, 2006
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              Quoting M Nist <mnist@...>:

              > It all depends on whether you are having a dearth (lack) of flow right
              > now. If the bees have nothing to store, they won't be inclined to draw
              > out comb.
              >
              > Why did you put a queen excluder on there? my mentor calls them
              > "honey excluders" because he believes that discouraging the queen from
              > going up there also discouraged the bees from using that space.

              This is not my experience nor my mentors. Although inferior stock will
              not go through most good stock will. It is also a complication that a
              beginner dose not need to worry about. The elimination of brood in the
              honey box is a simplification for the newbee. It saves steps in the
              long run. Also the number of hives that it makes a difference with are
              the minority.

              As with all beekeeping practices you will get a variety of opinions on
              the topic. Some based in fact, others personal experience, and some
              preconceived ideas. I have hives in my yards with and without
              excluder's. As for the amount of honey they produce. There is little
              or no difference that could not be explained by other characteristics
              of the colony.


              Thanks

              Shanta McBain
              http://ecf.beemaster.ca
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