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Re: [Advice about laying workers

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  • Evans Christopher
    Thanks for the advice. Additionally, should I freeze or chill the frames with all drone brood, larvae, and eggs before re-hiving? Chris Tifton, GA From: Jeff
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 1, 2006
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      Thanks for the advice. Additionally, should I freeze
      or chill the frames with all drone brood, larvae, and
      eggs before re-hiving?

      Chris
      Tifton, GA


      From: "Jeff Lunglhofer" Jeff@...
      Date: Tue May 30, 2006 2:45pm(PDT)
      Subject: Re: Advice about laying workers

      I was in the same situation recently. I removed the
      hive during the
      day and
      swapped it with my new hive. The returning foragers
      seemed to be let
      in in
      all the confusion, perhaps because they were all
      loaded with food.

      I then went away about 1/2 a mile and shook out ALL
      the bees from the
      old
      hive. The hive is now queen right, and much stronger
      in terms of total
      bees
      than the newly installed hive, so they must have
      accepted the bulk of
      the
      old bees that flew "home".

      I didn't really do anything more fancy than that!

      -Jeff

      _____

      From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of Evans Christopher
      Sent: Tuesday, May 30, 2006 8:10 AM
      To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [beekeeping] Advice about laying workers


      Greetings,

      I am a new beekeeper in South Georgia with two hives
      (Bought used equipment with established bees). One of
      my hives went queenless a while back and I left it
      alone to see if it would raise a new queen. I thought
      everything was going well when I saw eggs but a later
      inspection revealed it was only a laying worker
      (multiple eggs per cell). My hive has now been
      without a queen for a long time and I am assuming only
      has old workers and young drones. I want to add a
      small package of bees and a queen to try to save the
      hive. I plan on shaking all of the bees currently
      residing in the hive off away from the hive before
      adding the package and queen. My question is this:
      Will the bees that return from the shaking event
      accept the new bees that I add? If not, what do you
      recommend my course of action to be?

      Thanks,

      Chris
      Tifton, GA

      __________________________________________________
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    • Jeff Lunglhofer
      Actually yes, I forgot that part. I did freeze the frames for about two days to not only kill all the drone brood, but also all the mites that are in those
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 1, 2006
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        Actually yes, I forgot that part.  I did freeze the frames for about two days to not only kill all the drone brood, but also all the mites that are in those cells (they love the drone cells).  Then scrap off the caps and replace the frames.  My new hive cleaned them out and the queen started laying in the frames almost immediately.
         
        -Jeff


        From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Evans Christopher
        Sent: Thursday, June 01, 2006 5:17 AM
        To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [beekeeping] Re: [Advice about laying workers


        Thanks for the advice.  Additionally, should I freeze
        or chill the frames with all drone brood, larvae, and
        eggs before re-hiving?

        Chris
        Tifton, GA


        From: "Jeff Lunglhofer" Jeff@...
            Date: Tue May 30, 2006 2:45pm(PDT)
        Subject: Re: Advice about laying workers

        I was in the same situation recently.  I removed the
        hive during the
        day and
        swapped it with my new hive.  The returning foragers
        seemed to be let
        in in
        all the confusion, perhaps because they were all
        loaded with food. 

        I then went away about 1/2 a mile and shook out ALL
        the bees from the
        old
        hive.  The hive is now queen right, and much stronger
        in terms of total
        bees
        than the newly installed hive, so they must have
        accepted the bulk of
        the
        old bees that flew "home". 

        I didn't really do anything more fancy than that!

        -Jeff

          _____ 

        From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Evans Christopher
        Sent: Tuesday, May 30, 2006 8:10 AM
        To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [beekeeping] Advice about laying workers


        Greetings,

        I am a new beekeeper in South Georgia with two hives
        (Bought used equipment with established bees).  One of
        my hives went queenless a while back and I left it
        alone to see if it would raise a new queen.  I thought
        everything was going well when I saw eggs but a later
        inspection revealed it was only a laying worker
        (multiple eggs per cell).  My hive has now been
        without a queen for a long time and I am assuming only
        has old workers and young drones.  I want to add a
        small package of bees and a queen to try to save the
        hive.  I plan on shaking all of the bees currently
        residing in the hive off away from the hive before
        adding the package and queen.  My question is this:
        Will the bees that return from the shaking event
        accept the new bees that I add?  If not, what do you
        recommend my course of action to be?

        Thanks,

        Chris
        Tifton, GA

        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • FarmerBrown49@aol.com
        In a message dated 6/1/2006 7:22:24 A.M. Central Daylight Time, evanscw@yahoo.com writes: Thanks for the advice. Additionally, should I freeze or chill the
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 1, 2006
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          In a message dated 6/1/2006 7:22:24 A.M. Central Daylight Time, evanscw@... writes:
          Thanks for the advice.  Additionally, should I freeze
          or chill the frames with all drone brood, larvae, and
          eggs before re-hiving?

          Chris
          Tifton, GA
          Sammy Replies:  I wouldn't.
           
          Sammy
          A Beekeepers Chat Room. Go to our web site click on Chat Room.
          The 2006 Beekeepers Record Book is Now Available To Order go to
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        • evanscw
          Should I freeze ... What are the benefits/problems with freezing frames? I was going to shake the bees (and the laying worker) today and hive the a new
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 1, 2006
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            Should I freeze
            > or chill the frames with all drone brood, larvae, and
            > eggs before re-hiving?

            > Sammy Replies: I wouldn't.

            What are the benefits/problems with freezing frames? I was going to
            shake the bees (and the laying worker) today and hive the a new
            package tomorrow but the rain and wind has delayed that a bit. I hope
            to shake tomorrow and may hive the package at the same time. I
            thought about at least uncapping all of the drone brood.


            Thanks,

            Chris
            Tifton, GA
          • FarmerBrown49@aol.com
            In a message dated 6/1/2006 1:42:32 P.M. Central Daylight Time, evanscw@yahoo.com writes: Should I freeze ... What are the benefits/problems with freezing
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 1, 2006
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              In a message dated 6/1/2006 1:42:32 P.M. Central Daylight Time, evanscw@... writes:
              Should I freeze
              > or chill the frames  with all drone brood, larvae, and
              > eggs before  re-hiving?

              > Sammy Replies:  I wouldn't.

              What are the benefits/problems with freezing frames?  I was going to
              shake the bees (and the laying worker) today and hive the a new
              package tomorrow but the rain and wind has delayed that a bit.  I hope
              to shake tomorrow and may hive the package at the same time.  I
              thought about at least uncapping all of the drone brood.


              Thanks,

              Chris
              Tifton, GA
              Sammy Replies:  Frankly I missed the word "Drone" but I still wouldn't unless there was some good reason such as bad gene line.  But if it is mites your are trying to prevent or control indeed freeze them.
               
              Sammy
              A Beekeepers Chat Room. Go to our web site click on Chat Room.
              The 2006 Beekeepers Record Book is Now Available To Order go to
              Our web site: http://brownsapiaries.com/
              add your name to our Beekeepers Directory at http://brownsapiaries.com/addtolist.html
              Subscribe to: AmericanBeeBreeders-subscribe@yahoogroups.com Host your Web site with BizLand!
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