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Re: [beekeeping] newbie with feeding question

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  • Shane Woodruff
    Greg & Terri, Its a natural thing for bees to swarm when they are doing well and a good nectar flow is happening. It is unusual for this to happen this late in
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 22, 2002
      Greg & Terri,

      Its a natural thing for bees to swarm when they
      are doing well and a good nectar flow is happening.
      It is unusual for this to happen this late in the
      summer though. Since your clipped queen couldn't fly
      they raised up a new queen who could. I'm not sure
      how many frames your observation hive contains but if
      its large enough and you have it ventillated to the
      outside you may be able to keep the bees alive during
      the winter. Just feed them if they run low on food if
      you keep them in a cold climate. They will build up
      in population in the coming weeks. If bees want to
      swarm there isn't much you can do to keep them back
      but to remove some bees and give them more room. I
      usually unite any observation hives I have back with a
      regular hive prior to winter. Its easier that way.
      It is often difficult to keep them alive during the
      winter. Then, I start a new one in the spring with a
      few frames of bees containing eggs less than 3 days
      old. Generally, they raise up a new queen in the
      spring and I have an observation hive going again for
      the following summer. Shane from NJ
      --- Indianfields Township Cemetery <indcem@...>
      wrote:
      > We have recently begun beekeeping and have started
      > an observation hive at the nature center in our
      > park. We learned a lot from "hands on" training
      > last year, or so we thought. This year, we ordered
      > bees for our observation hive with a clipped queen,
      > which we thought would prevent swarming. The bees
      > did very well for four months; building honeycomb,
      > making capped brood, etc., and we had a very large
      > bee population. Suddenly, we have only about 1/3 of
      > the original number, just within the last few days
      > they must have swarmed, anyway. Does anybody have
      > an observation hive and do you have any advice on
      > what we might have done better?
      >
      > Greg & Teri Barrons
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Garry Libby
      > To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, August 21, 2002 10:03 AM
      > Subject: RE: [beekeeping] newbie with feeding
      > question
      >
      >
      > Hi Dave,
      > What Shane said is true. Also, old honey is
      > not good for bees You should just get rid of it. But
      > make sure it stays sealed so bees can't rob it.
      > Best wishes,
      > Garry Libby
      >
      >
      >
      > Garry Libby
      > Attleboro, Massachusetts, USA
      >
      >
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