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Re: Advice - Partially filled frames

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  • Joseph Clemens
    I ve been keeping bees since 1964 and I have never used any treatments, ever. Presently I have been keeping bees here in Tucson for 9 years. I have managed to
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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      I've been keeping bees since 1964 and I have never used any
      treatments, ever. Presently I have been keeping bees here in Tucson
      for 9 years. I have managed to maintain 100% survival and all without
      treatments of any kind.

      Joseph Clemens
      Tucson, Arizona

      --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Gillmore" <magfamhist@s...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I have just gotten back into beekeeping this year ( after 25 + years
      ) and have never had to treat my hives in the past with medication. I
      am getting ready to treat my colonies for mites with MiteAway II and
      will be taking off all of the supers prior to treatment. I'm wondering
      what to do with the partially filled frames for the 3 weeks that I am
      treating.
      > Will the honey ferment in that amount of time ?
      > What should I do with them ?
      > If they are to be put back on the hive after treatment, is there
      additional time that I need to wait for the medication to clear out.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Mike
      >
    • D.O.
      Joseph, How often do you requeen? Or do you let the bees do that? I m a first-year beekeeper and hope to not use any treatments. So far, so good. I have two
      Message 2 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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        Joseph,

        How often do you requeen? Or do you let the bees do
        that?

        I'm a first-year beekeeper and hope to not use any
        treatments. So far, so good. I have two strong hives
        with good stores as the cold weather approaches. (Of
        course, I'm in California where they still get out a
        bit in December and January.)

        --- Joseph Clemens <honeybee@...> wrote:

        > I've been keeping bees since 1964 and I have never
        > used any
        > treatments, ever. Presently I have been keeping bees
        > here in Tucson
        > for 9 years. I have managed to maintain 100%
        > survival and all without
        > treatments of any kind.
        >
        > Joseph Clemens
        > Tucson, Arizona
        >
        > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Gillmore"
        > <magfamhist@s...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > I have just gotten back into beekeeping this year
        > ( after 25 + years
        > ) and have never had to treat my hives in the past
        > with medication. I
        > am getting ready to treat my colonies for mites with
        > MiteAway II and
        > will be taking off all of the supers prior to
        > treatment. I'm wondering
        > what to do with the partially filled frames for the
        > 3 weeks that I am
        > treating.
        > > Will the honey ferment in that amount of time ?
        > > What should I do with them ?
        > > If they are to be put back on the hive after
        > treatment, is there
        > additional time that I need to wait for the
        > medication to clear out.
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > >
        > > Mike
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • davidbrowder
        If it s just a couple I d guess one could put em in the freezer, never tried that myself though. Leave the supers out in a covered location where the bees can
        Message 3 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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          If it's just a couple I'd guess one could put em in the freezer, never tried that myself though. Leave the supers out in a covered location where the bees can "rob" em. bet they'll be empty soon enough!!
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, October 07, 2005 6:04 PM
          Subject: [beekeeping] Advice - Partially filled frames

          I have just gotten back into beekeeping this year ( after 25 + years ) and have never had to treat my hives in the past with medication. I am getting ready to treat my colonies for mites with MiteAway II and will be taking off all of the supers prior to treatment. I'm wondering what to do with the partially filled frames for the 3 weeks that I am treating.
          Will the honey ferment in that amount of time ?
          What should I do with them ?
          If they are to be put back on the hive after treatment, is there additional time that I need to wait for the medication to clear out.
           
          Thanks,
           
          Mike
        • Mike Gillmore
          Joseph, It s great to hear that you ve had such wonderful success, with no losses. I m afraid I ve not been been quite as fortunate here in Ohio. My colonies
          Message 4 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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            Joseph,
            It's great to hear that you've had such wonderful success, with no losses.
            I'm afraid I've not been been quite as fortunate here in Ohio. My colonies
            are infested with mites and I need to act before we move into the winter
            season. They have good stores and are prepared for winter, but I need to
            take care of the pests. Hopefully someone will actually respond to my
            original inquiry.
            Mike

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Joseph Clemens" <honeybee@tropical-Subject: [beekeeping] Re: Advice -
            Partially filled frames


            > I've been keeping bees since 1964 and I have never used any
            > treatments, ever. Presently I have been keeping bees here in Tucson
            > for 9 years. I have managed to maintain 100% survival and all without
            > treatments of any kind.
            >
            > Joseph Clemens
            > Tucson, Arizona
            >
            > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Gillmore" <magfamhist@s...>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > I have just gotten back into beekeeping this year ( after 25 + years
            > ) and have never had to treat my hives in the past with medication. I
            > am getting ready to treat my colonies for mites with MiteAway II and
            > will be taking off all of the supers prior to treatment. I'm wondering
            > what to do with the partially filled frames for the 3 weeks that I am
            > treating.
            > > Will the honey ferment in that amount of time ?
            > > What should I do with them ?
            > > If they are to be put back on the hive after treatment, is there
            > additional time that I need to wait for the medication to clear out.
            > >
            > > Thanks,
            > >
            > > Mike
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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            > Yahoo! Groups Links
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          • George Fergusson
            Mike- if you store the supers, wax moth and/or small hive beetle might have them for supper. Given the season, I d feed `em to the bees if it was me. As for
            Message 5 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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              Mike- if you store the supers, wax moth and/or small hive beetle might have
              them for supper. Given the season, I'd feed `em to the bees if it was me.
              As for how to manage your hives post-treatment with Miteaway II, I have no
              idea. I've never used it. I'd hope there were sufficient directions
              supplied with it! If not, I'm sure you can find more information on the
              web. Seems to me you aren't supposed to put supers back on for a while- a
              week or more. Formic acid is nasty. Be careful.

              George-

              At 05:49 PM 10/7/05 -0500, you wrote:
              >Joseph,
              >It's great to hear that you've had such wonderful success, with no losses.
              >I'm afraid I've not been been quite as fortunate here in Ohio. My colonies
              >are infested with mites and I need to act before we move into the winter
              >season. They have good stores and are prepared for winter, but I need to
              >take care of the pests. Hopefully someone will actually respond to my
              >original inquiry.
              >Mike

              ---------------------------------------
              George & Nancy Fergusson
              Sweet Time Apiary
              326 Jefferson Road
              Whitefield Maine 04353
              207-549-5991
              http://www.sweettimeapiary.com/
            • Mike Gillmore
              That makes sense David. Leaving them out would eliminate the possibility of contaminating the supers by putting them back on after treatment, yet I will still
              Message 6 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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                That makes sense David. Leaving them out would eliminate the possibility of contaminating the supers by putting them back on after treatment, yet I will still be fairly sure that my colonies will end up with the goods for winter.
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Friday, October 07, 2005 5:31 PM
                Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Advice - Partially filled frames

                If it's just a couple I'd guess one could put em in the freezer, never tried that myself though. Leave the supers out in a covered location where the bees can "rob" em. bet they'll be empty soon enough!!
              • Mike Gillmore
                I ll be careful, George. I know this stuff is pretty potent, and I really don t like using it, but it sounds like the best route for this time of year
                Message 7 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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                  I'll be careful, George. I know this stuff is pretty potent, and I really
                  don't like using it, but it sounds like the best route for this time of year
                  considering the condition of my colonies. Hopefully this will knock out the
                  mites for the winter and then next spring I can use more moderate management
                  techniques.
                  I have 3 supers that are capped and 3 that are full of nectar, but not yet
                  capped. They are so close to being ready that I hate to just put them out in
                  the yard, but I suppose that's better than losing them to moths or other
                  insects.

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "George Fergusson" <gsferg@...>

                  > Mike- if you store the supers, wax moth and/or small hive beetle might
                  have
                  > them for supper. Given the season, I'd feed `em to the bees if it was me.
                  > As for how to manage your hives post-treatment with Miteaway II, I have no
                  > idea. I've never used it. I'd hope there were sufficient directions
                  > supplied with it! If not, I'm sure you can find more information on the
                  > web. Seems to me you aren't supposed to put supers back on for a while- a
                  > week or more. Formic acid is nasty. Be careful.
                  >
                • Joseph Clemens
                  In my original apiary I let the bees manage their own queens, however, if a hive becomes queenless I ensure they have the eggs they need to produce a
                  Message 8 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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                    In my original apiary I let the bees manage their own queens, however,
                    if a hive becomes queenless I ensure they have the eggs they need to
                    produce a replacement. This season I established a few nucs for
                    keeping standby queens (I have not yet needed to use them).

                    Joseph Clemens
                    Tucson, Arizona

                    --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "D.O." <kg6mvx@y...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Joseph,
                    >
                    > How often do you requeen? Or do you let the bees do
                    > that?
                    >
                    > I'm a first-year beekeeper and hope to not use any
                    > treatments. So far, so good. I have two strong hives
                    > with good stores as the cold weather approaches. (Of
                    > course, I'm in California where they still get out a
                    > bit in December and January.)
                    >
                    > --- Joseph Clemens <honeybee@t...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > I've been keeping bees since 1964 and I have never
                    > > used any
                    > > treatments, ever. Presently I have been keeping bees
                    > > here in Tucson
                    > > for 9 years. I have managed to maintain 100%
                    > > survival and all without
                    > > treatments of any kind.
                    > >
                    > > Joseph Clemens
                    > > Tucson, Arizona
                    > >
                    > > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Gillmore"
                    > > <magfamhist@s...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > I have just gotten back into beekeeping this year
                    > > ( after 25 + years
                    > > ) and have never had to treat my hives in the past
                    > > with medication. I
                    > > am getting ready to treat my colonies for mites with
                    > > MiteAway II and
                    > > will be taking off all of the supers prior to
                    > > treatment. I'm wondering
                    > > what to do with the partially filled frames for the
                    > > 3 weeks that I am
                    > > treating.
                    > > > Will the honey ferment in that amount of time ?
                    > > > What should I do with them ?
                    > > > If they are to be put back on the hive after
                    > > treatment, is there
                    > > additional time that I need to wait for the
                    > > medication to clear out.
                    > > >
                    > > > Thanks,
                    > > >
                    > > > Mike
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
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                  • Joseph Clemens
                    Mike, I didn t mean to imply that my bees are mite-free , they are not, they do have Varroa, but for some unknown reason the mites haven t caused them any
                    Message 9 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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                      Mike,
                      I didn't mean to imply that my bees are "mite-free", they are not,
                      they do have Varroa, but for some unknown reason the mites haven't
                      caused them any obvious distress.

                      Many years ago I kept a few colonies on my uncles farm in Key, Ohio.

                      I hope you find the answer to treatment you are looking for.

                      Joseph Clemens
                      Tucson, Arizona

                      --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Gillmore" <magfamhist@s...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > Joseph,
                      > It's great to hear that you've had such wonderful success, with no
                      losses.
                      > I'm afraid I've not been been quite as fortunate here in Ohio. My
                      colonies
                      > are infested with mites and I need to act before we move into the winter
                      > season. They have good stores and are prepared for winter, but I need to
                      > take care of the pests. Hopefully someone will actually respond to my
                      > original inquiry.
                      > Mike
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: "Joseph Clemens" <honeybee@tropical-Subject: [beekeeping] Re:
                      Advice -
                      > Partially filled frames
                      >
                      >
                      > > I've been keeping bees since 1964 and I have never used any
                      > > treatments, ever. Presently I have been keeping bees here in Tucson
                      > > for 9 years. I have managed to maintain 100% survival and all without
                      > > treatments of any kind.
                      > >
                      > > Joseph Clemens
                      > > Tucson, Arizona
                      > >
                      > > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Gillmore" <magfamhist@s...>
                      > > wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > I have just gotten back into beekeeping this year ( after 25 + years
                      > > ) and have never had to treat my hives in the past with medication. I
                      > > am getting ready to treat my colonies for mites with MiteAway II and
                      > > will be taking off all of the supers prior to treatment. I'm wondering
                      > > what to do with the partially filled frames for the 3 weeks that I am
                      > > treating.
                      > > > Will the honey ferment in that amount of time ?
                      > > > What should I do with them ?
                      > > > If they are to be put back on the hive after treatment, is there
                      > > additional time that I need to wait for the medication to clear out.
                      > > >
                      > > > Thanks,
                      > > >
                      > > > Mike
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >
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                    • Chip Phelps
                      If you leave the supers out in the yards they will probably get robbed and fill up your other frames or other bee s frames and reserves. They would also be
                      Message 10 of 18 , Oct 7, 2005
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                        If you leave the supers out in the yards they will probably get robbed
                        and fill up your other frames or other bee's frames and reserves. They
                        would also be prone to infestation with any beetle or wax moth larvae
                        that are ALREADY on / in them, let alone anything that got in there when
                        they are being stored.

                        The best bet is to do like the one person said and put them in a big
                        freezer if you have one. That will kill everything on them and in them
                        and they will be in perfect shape for your bees after the three weeks
                        are up. Alternatively if you don't have a freezer you need to get
                        them into some type of air tight space (maybe a really large cooler from
                        wal-mart or something but you'd have to pull the frames out of the
                        boxes) and put in about a pound of dry ice or so per deep super and seal
                        it up tight. Not really to freeze everything, but to remove all the
                        oxygen. The dry ice will melt into Carbon Dioxide and kill anything in
                        there almost as good as the cold freezer will. Put new dry ice in every
                        5 days or so and make sure it is all air tight. Also check the frames
                        before you add the new dry ice for any problems.

                        Otherwise, without the bees there to police things on those frames,
                        after three weeks you may not have anything worth putting back on the hives.

                        You could also harvest everything off of the capped frames, and just
                        protect the uncapped frames. Later feed with sugar water to help
                        support them through the hard times.

                        Either way, good luck!

                        -Chip

                        Mike Gillmore wrote:

                        >I'll be careful, George. I know this stuff is pretty potent, and I really
                        >don't like using it, but it sounds like the best route for this time of year
                        >considering the condition of my colonies. Hopefully this will knock out the
                        >mites for the winter and then next spring I can use more moderate management
                        >techniques.
                        >I have 3 supers that are capped and 3 that are full of nectar, but not yet
                        >capped. They are so close to being ready that I hate to just put them out in
                        >the yard, but I suppose that's better than losing them to moths or other
                        >insects.
                        >
                        >----- Original Message -----
                        >From: "George Fergusson" <gsferg@...>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >>Mike- if you store the supers, wax moth and/or small hive beetle might
                        >>
                        >>
                        >have
                        >
                        >
                        >>them for supper. Given the season, I'd feed `em to the bees if it was me.
                        >>As for how to manage your hives post-treatment with Miteaway II, I have no
                        >>idea. I've never used it. I'd hope there were sufficient directions
                        >>supplied with it! If not, I'm sure you can find more information on the
                        >>web. Seems to me you aren't supposed to put supers back on for a while- a
                        >>week or more. Formic acid is nasty. Be careful.
                        >>
                        >>
                      • George Fergusson
                        I ve been using oxalic acid vapor on my bees which isn t the nicest stuff to handle either. You could always get ahold of a refractometer and check the
                        Message 11 of 18 , Oct 8, 2005
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                          I've been using oxalic acid vapor on my bees which isn't the nicest stuff
                          to handle either.

                          You could always get ahold of a refractometer and check the moisture
                          content of the uncapped honey- it might be fine to extract. I understand
                          how you feel about it, but if you're going to be feeding your bees anyways,
                          feeding honey/nectar back to them is desirable thing to do. Letting `em rob
                          it isn't the greatest way to do it, but I've been doing the same thing. A
                          more appropriate way would be to extract it first, then feed it back in a
                          manner that is more traditional.

                          George-

                          At 10:46 PM 10/7/05 -0500, you wrote:
                          >I'll be careful, George. I know this stuff is pretty potent, and I really
                          >don't like using it, but it sounds like the best route for this time of year
                          >considering the condition of my colonies. Hopefully this will knock out the
                          >mites for the winter and then next spring I can use more moderate management
                          >techniques.
                          >I have 3 supers that are capped and 3 that are full of nectar, but not yet
                          >capped. They are so close to being ready that I hate to just put them out in
                          >the yard, but I suppose that's better than losing them to moths or other
                          >insects.
                          >
                          >----- Original Message -----
                          >From: "George Fergusson" <gsferg@...>
                          >
                          >> Mike- if you store the supers, wax moth and/or small hive beetle might
                          >have
                          >> them for supper. Given the season, I'd feed `em to the bees if it was me.
                          >> As for how to manage your hives post-treatment with Miteaway II, I have no
                          >> idea. I've never used it. I'd hope there were sufficient directions
                          >> supplied with it! If not, I'm sure you can find more information on the
                          >> web. Seems to me you aren't supposed to put supers back on for a while- a
                          >> week or more. Formic acid is nasty. Be careful.
                          >>
                          >
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                          ---------------------------------------
                          George & Nancy Fergusson
                          Sweet Time Apiary
                          326 Jefferson Road
                          Whitefield Maine 04353
                          207-549-5991
                          http://www.sweettimeapiary.com/
                        • Scot Mc Pherson
                          George, Why are you using acids, do your bees already show signs of trouble? Scot Mc Pherson McPherson Family Honey Farms Davenport, IA Bradenton, FL
                          Message 12 of 18 , Oct 8, 2005
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                            George,
                            Why are you using acids, do your bees already show signs of trouble?



                            Scot Mc Pherson
                            McPherson Family Honey Farms
                            Davenport, IA
                            Bradenton, FL
                            http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/
                            http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org
                            http://groups.yahoo.com/groups/OrganicBeekeepers/
                          • George Fergusson
                            Yes Scot, deformed wing virus. Bees with shriveled wings walking around the combs, bald-headed brood, uncapped dead larvae. Never having seen it before, I
                            Message 13 of 18 , Oct 8, 2005
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                              Yes Scot, deformed wing virus. Bees with shriveled wings walking around the
                              combs, bald-headed brood, uncapped dead larvae. Never having seen it
                              before, I can't rate it's severity but even to my unpracticed eye, it ain't
                              right.

                              I've requeened two of the worst afflicted hives, I'm hoping that with a new
                              queen and the mite load knocked down to something manageable, they'll make
                              it through the winter and I can start `em on some small cell foundation.

                              Or, they'll die. I'd like to get as many hives through the winter as I can
                              to have as much to work with next year as possible.

                              George-

                              At 12:33 PM 10/8/05 -0500, you wrote:
                              >George,
                              >Why are you using acids, do your bees already show signs of trouble?
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >Scot Mc Pherson
                              >McPherson Family Honey Farms
                              >Davenport, IA
                              >Bradenton, FL
                              >http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/
                              >http://beewiki.linuxfromscratch.org
                              >http://groups.yahoo.com/groups/OrganicBeekeepers/
                              >
                              >
                              >
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                              >Yahoo! Groups Links
                              >
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                              ---------------------------------------
                              George & Nancy Fergusson
                              Sweet Time Apiary
                              326 Jefferson Road
                              Whitefield Maine 04353
                              207-549-5991
                              http://www.sweettimeapiary.com/
                            • Martin Gutzmer
                              Hi all, I have been busy with my day job, and find that nectar flow has stopped. We have had some frost. Can I still get in and get the supers off the hive, or
                              Message 14 of 18 , Oct 8, 2005
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                                Hi all,
                                I have been busy with my day job, and find that nectar flow has stopped.
                                We have had some frost.
                                Can I still get in and get the supers off the hive, or should I just "store" them on the hive until spring??
                                Advice Please.
                                Thanks,.
                                Martin
                              • D.O.
                                I captured a swarm on June 21st and have two hives. The June 21st colony grew okay for a bit, but levelled off and stopped growing. I visited them Saturday and
                                Message 15 of 18 , Oct 11, 2005
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                                  I captured a swarm on June 21st and have two hives.
                                  The June 21st colony grew okay for a bit, but levelled
                                  off and stopped growing. I visited them Saturday and
                                  made the following observations:

                                  - More than a dozen workers walking around outside on
                                  the ground around the hive.

                                  - Very low honey--almost none capped--even though the
                                  hive right next to them has substantial stores.

                                  - A good number of larvae in various stages of
                                  development. (I didn't see the queen.)

                                  - A small number of drones. (They haven't been kicked
                                  out of my other hive either.)

                                  I'm in Santa Clara County, California, where we have
                                  rather mild winters. However, we do have a number of
                                  days that do not get above 50F (10C).

                                  This hive has a solid bottom board. The strong one
                                  next to it has a screened bottom board. I'm not sure
                                  how much difference that makes.

                                  What actions, if any, do you suggest that I take?

                                  Thank you!






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                                • FarmerBrown49@aol.com
                                  In a message dated 10/11/2005 12:48:54 P.M. Central Daylight Time, kg6mvx@yahoo.com writes: - A small number of drones. (They haven t been kicked out of my
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Oct 11, 2005
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                                    In a message dated 10/11/2005 12:48:54 P.M. Central Daylight Time, kg6mvx@... writes:
                                    - A small number of drones. (They haven't been kicked
                                    out of my other hive either.)

                                    I'm in Santa Clara County, California, where we have
                                    rather mild winters. However, we do have a number of
                                    days that do not get above 50F (10C).

                                    This hive has a solid bottom board. The strong one
                                    next to it has a screened bottom board. I'm not sure
                                    how much difference that makes.

                                    What actions, if any, do you suggest that I take?

                                    Thank you!
                                    Sammy Replies:  I don't think the difference bottom boards make the difference.  My suggestion for the smaller hive is feed, feed, feed, or unite them with the stronger one.
                                     
                                    As for drones still being in your hives.  We to have very mild winters here in Southeast Texas.  I also winter in three deep hive bodies and my bees have an abundance of winter stores, helps with early spring build up.  I have seen drones in my hives year around.  Not nearly as many in the winter as in spring and summer, but some just the same.  Also in select hives I keep full frames of Drone combs for the production of drones. 
                                     
                                    Sammy
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                                  • r.david wells
                                    requeen and get a screened bottom board,i m in upstate ny we get down to -20 with bad winds D.O. wrote: I captured a swarm on June 21st
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Oct 11, 2005
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                                      requeen and get a screened bottom board,i'm in upstate ny we get down to -20 with bad winds

                                      "D.O." <kg6mvx@...> wrote:

                                      I captured a swarm on June 21st and have two hives.
                                      The June 21st colony grew okay for a bit, but levelled
                                      off and stopped growing. I visited them Saturday and
                                      made the following observations:

                                      - More than a dozen workers walking around outside on
                                      the ground around the hive.

                                      - Very low honey--almost none capped--even though the
                                      hive right next to them has substantial stores.

                                      - A good number of larvae in various stages of
                                      development. (I didn't see the queen.)

                                      - A small number of drones. (They haven't been kicked
                                      out of my other hive either.)

                                      I'm in Santa Clara County, California, where we have
                                      rather mild winters. However, we do have a number of
                                      days that do not get above 50F (10C).

                                      This hive has a solid bottom board. The strong one
                                      next to it has a screened bottom board. I'm not sure
                                      how much difference that makes.

                                      What actions, if any, do you suggest that I take?

                                      Thank you!





                                                 
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