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Was: essential oils Now: mite fall

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  • Barb Miller
    Mark wrote: I ve been using FGMO in a fogger. It seems to be working for me. I have a couple of weak colonies, but don t think its
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 26, 2002
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      "Mark" <mcoldiron@...> wrote:
      I've been using FGMO in a fogger. It seems to be working for me. I have a
      couple of weak colonies, but don't think its due to mites. The queens just
      didn't produce like the others. If they make it through the winter, I'll
      join them with some others or requeen. By the way, what did you use to
      produce the "mite fall" when you put in the sticky board in?

      Hi Mark,
      I've been reading about FGMO on Bee-L - where did you get the fogger? I
      didn't use anything to facilitate
      the mite fall - just sprayed pam on the board and stuck it in. Been trying
      to get away from
      the chemicals so didn't want to use strips.
      Sincerely,
      Barb Miller
      N. Central PA
    • Mark
      Mornin Barb, The fogger can be purchased at ACE Hardware, Home Depot, Lowes, and others. The name of it is Burgess Fogger, I think that s close. It runs
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 27, 2002
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        Mornin Barb,

        The fogger can be purchased at ACE Hardware, Home Depot, Lowes, and others.
        The name of it is Burgess Fogger, I think that's close. It runs around
        $50-60. The food grade mineral oil can be purchased almost any place -
        WalMart, grocery stores, pharmacies, etc... You may find that to be cost
        effective larger quantities (5 gl.) are better. STE Oil is where I bought
        mine. If you only have a few colonies, a couple of pints might last you all
        year.

        I'm not saying it's the answer to all your mite problems, but it seems to be
        working for me. To review the research from Dr. Rodreguez, go to
        www.beesource.com/pov. A link to his research is at the bottom of the page.
        He talks about using FGMO in other ways besides a fogger too. If you are a
        small operation, you may want to try some of the other methods he mentions
        too.

        Avoiding chemicals is why I chose Dr. Rodriguez's methods, and according to
        Dr. Rodriguez, the fog also kills tracheal mites.

        To get a mite fall, other than just putting in a sticky board, you might try
        some of the alternative methods around - tobacco smoke, grapefruit leaf
        smoke, FGMO fog, Creosote Bush leaf smoke, and others. Don't forget the
        ether roll and the sugar roll for checking mite populations.

        Good luck with your bees.

        Mark in west Texas.

        > Hi Mark,
        > I've been reading about FGMO on Bee-L - where did you get the fogger? I
        > didn't use anything to facilitate
        > the mite fall - just sprayed pam on the board and stuck it in. Been
        trying
        > to get away from
        > the chemicals so didn't want to use strips.
        > Sincerely,
        > Barb Miller
        > N. Central PA
        >
      • Karen Oland
        Mark, at what temperatures do you start/stop fogging? Also, a straight mite drop, with no chemical inducement is now being seen as the most accurate method for
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 27, 2002
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          Mark,

          at what temperatures do you start/stop fogging?

          Also, a straight mite drop, with no chemical inducement is now being seen as
          the most accurate method for determining when to treat, under IPM practices
          (whatever you treat with). I forget the exact count at which they say to
          treat, but it is probably in the archives of the newsgroup
          sci.agriculture.beekeping from last fall. if not there, then on the mailing
          list Bee-L's archives. Of the rolls, the sugar roll was found to be most
          accurate, but not as much as the straight drop for predicting actual mite
          infestation levels, as you are not always getting just a jar of nurse bees.

          Karen
        • Mark
          I fog every two weeks as Dr. Rodreguez recommends. The only time I stop is when I can t get into the apiary due to rain or when it s cold and the bees aren t
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 27, 2002
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            I fog every two weeks as Dr. Rodreguez recommends. The only time I stop is
            when I can't get into the apiary due to rain or when it's cold and the bees
            aren't flying. It only takes a few seconds per hive, so it's really no
            problem to treat.

            Mark

            > at what temperatures do you start/stop fogging?
            >
            > Also, a straight mite drop, with no chemical inducement is now being seen
            as
            > the most accurate method for determining when to treat, under IPM
            practices
            > (whatever you treat with). I forget the exact count at which they say to
            > treat, but it is probably in the archives of the newsgroup
            > sci.agriculture.beekeping from last fall. if not there, then on the
            mailing
            > list Bee-L's archives. Of the rolls, the sugar roll was found to be most
            > accurate, but not as much as the straight drop for predicting actual mite
            > infestation levels, as you are not always getting just a jar of nurse
            bees.
            >
            > Karen
          • Karen Oland
            Perhaps I can rephrase? When do you start fogging in the spring, when do you stop in the fall? And what zone are you in? ... From: Mark
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 27, 2002
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              Perhaps I can rephrase? When do you start fogging in the spring, when do you
              stop in the fall? And what zone are you in?

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Mark [mailto:mcoldiron@...]
              Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2002 11:31 AM
              To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Was: essential oils Now: mite fall


              I fog every two weeks as Dr. Rodreguez recommends. The only time I stop is
              when I can't get into the apiary due to rain or when it's cold and the bees
              aren't flying. It only takes a few seconds per hive, so it's really no
              problem to treat.

              Mark

              > at what temperatures do you start/stop fogging?
              >
              > Also, a straight mite drop, with no chemical inducement is now being seen
              as
              > the most accurate method for determining when to treat, under IPM
              practices
              > (whatever you treat with). I forget the exact count at which they say to
              > treat, but it is probably in the archives of the newsgroup
              > sci.agriculture.beekeping from last fall. if not there, then on the
              mailing
              > list Bee-L's archives. Of the rolls, the sugar roll was found to be most
              > accurate, but not as much as the straight drop for predicting actual mite
              > infestation levels, as you are not always getting just a jar of nurse
              bees.
              >
              > Karen






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            • Mark
              There s no specific date or dates to start and stop. I just go by the weather. If it s warm and the bees are flying in December, I fog. A couple of days ago
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 27, 2002
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                There's no specific date or dates to start and stop. I just go by the
                weather. If it's warm and the bees are flying in December, I fog. A couple
                of days ago it was 83 here, so I fogged. The key is brood rearing. It's
                important to fog when the queen is actively laying eggs to kill the Varroa
                before they can crawl into the cell to breed. I started Spring buildup in
                the last week in January, so I tried to fog every couple of weeks after
                that, but sometimes couldn't because it was too cold. As it gets warmer,
                I'll try to keep it as close to every two weeks as I can.

                I suppose it's not so important during the winter, but it's good to kill off
                as many mites as possible before the bees begin to cluster so the mites
                don't spend all winter working on the existing bees.

                Hope this helps.

                Mark

                > Perhaps I can rephrase? When do you start fogging in the spring, when do
                you
                > stop in the fall? And what zone are you in?
              • Mark
                ... I think I m in zone 7 Mark
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 27, 2002
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                  > And what zone are you in?

                  I think I'm in zone 7

                  Mark
                • Karen Oland
                  A couple of days ago here, it was nearly 70. Today s high is about 20. Thanks for the explanation, sounds like I would have to fog even in the 40 s in winter,
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 27, 2002
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                    A couple of days ago here, it was nearly 70. Today's high is about 20.

                    Thanks for the explanation, sounds like I would have to fog even in the 40's
                    in winter, as brood rearing starts before it gets warm enough for a lot of
                    flying (esp on the italians).

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Mark

                    There's no specific date or dates to start and stop. I just go by the
                    weather. If it's warm and the bees are flying in December, I fog. A couple
                    of days ago it was 83 here, so I fogged. The key is brood rearing. It's
                    important to fog when the queen is actively laying eggs to kill the Varroa
                    before they can crawl into the cell to breed.
                  • Mark
                    No. Only fog when they are flying. 40 s are too cold to fly. The day it was up to 70 would have been good. Mark ... 40 s
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 27, 2002
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                      No. Only fog when they are flying. 40's are too cold to fly. The day it
                      was up to 70 would have been good.

                      Mark


                      > A couple of days ago here, it was nearly 70. Today's high is about 20.
                      >
                      > Thanks for the explanation, sounds like I would have to fog even in the
                      40's
                      > in winter, as brood rearing starts before it gets warm enough for a lot of
                      > flying (esp on the italians).
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