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flowers

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  • tlcrosley
    Hi- What kinds of flowers would be good to plant in my gardens this year that would be beneficial to my bees. I live in North-Central PA. Sorry for any
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 19, 2002
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      Hi-
      What kinds of flowers would be good to plant in my gardens this year
      that would be beneficial to my bees. I live in North-Central PA.
      Sorry for any cross-posting.
      Leah
    • Reuben Watkins
      There are several good resources on line. You could try a google search on bee plants . My favorite source is beeplants.com, but they are in the midst of an
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 19, 2002
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        There are several good resources on line. You could try a google search on "bee plants". My favorite source is beeplants.com, but they are in the midst of an overhaul. Tom Clothier has a great site and sells seed he has collected from his garden. I have had excellent results with Tom's seed. http://users.anet.com/~manytimes/
         
        Plant all you can,
         
        Reuben Watkin
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: tlcrosley
        Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 12:20 PM
        To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [beekeeping] flowers
         
        Hi-
        What kinds of flowers would be good to plant in my gardens this year
        that would be beneficial to my bees.  I live in North-Central PA.
        Sorry for any cross-posting.
        Leah




        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


      • Mark
        It depends on the size of your yard and if you want the flowers THIS year. If you have the room, try Vitec. It s a woody bush with tons of flowers. Bees love
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 19, 2002
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          It depends on the size of your yard and if you want the flowers THIS year.
          If you have the room, try Vitec. It's a woody bush with tons of flowers.
          Bees love it and it produces a lot of nectar. Problem is, it takes a year
          or so to get big enough to put out many flowers, and it gets really big -
          15-17 feet tall. I suppose you could keep it pruned. :-) Cotton puts out a
          lot more nectar than most plants. It blooms in Texas around the end of July
          or middle of Aug. depending when it was planted. Cotton is a pretty plant
          and the bolls look nice in a garden. Fruit trees are good in the Spring. I
          like apples, cherries, and pears. I suppose you could pick what you like.
          Again it takes 3 to 5 years to get big enough to really have a lot of
          blooms. Alfalfa makes a lot of blooms, and bees like it. Sunflowers are
          good too, but you will need to plant a lot of them. The trick is to find
          several plants and stagger the blooming periods. I'm in Texas, so you'll
          have to check out some of the crops grown in your area. Rape - used for
          rape oil is also a good one for the spring. A lot of your good smelling
          flowers, like roses, don't help the bees. Dandelions are another good
          spring plant. Lots of people use them for salads. Sage blooms later in the
          season and makes a good honey. I like purple sage the best. I think there
          is a Russian variety that's pretty good too. You can buy wild flower mixes
          at a lot of stores - I know Wally World has them. Trouble with that is you
          need a pretty big space to make any difference.

          Hope this helps.

          Mark

          Mark
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "tlcrosley" <crosley@...>
          To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 12:16 PM
          Subject: [beekeeping] flowers


          > Hi-
          > What kinds of flowers would be good to plant in my gardens this year
          > that would be beneficial to my bees. I live in North-Central PA.
          > Sorry for any cross-posting.
          > Leah
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
        • tlcrosley
          Thanks Mark. I ve never heard of vitec . I don t think cotton will grow in PA, but I d be willing to give it a try. We have several apple trees in the
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 20, 2002
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            Thanks Mark. I've never heard of 'vitec'. I don't think cotton will grow
            in PA, but I'd be willing to give it a try. We have several apple trees in
            the area, as well as wild cherry. A local hunting club has planted alfalfa
            in the past. My husband is a member, I told him to mention planting it
            again to them. I've haven't heard of 'rape' either. Maybe it doesn't grow
            in this zone. Dandelions grow everywhere here from early spring till
            mid-summer. Sage is do-able. We don't have 'Wally Worlds' here, but I've
            seen wildflower mixtures at Wal-Mart. The mixes they had were: shady, full
            sun, sun & shade, butterfly, and humming bird. Would the butterfly be ok?
            Space isn't a problem, we live on the edges of old farming fields, near
            woods. The nearest neighbors are 1/2 - 1 mile away.
            Leah

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Mark" <mcoldiron@...>
            To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 1:44 PM
            Subject: Re: [beekeeping] flowers


            > It depends on the size of your yard and if you want the flowers THIS year.
            > If you have the room, try Vitec. It's a woody bush with tons of flowers.
            > Bees love it and it produces a lot of nectar. Problem is, it takes a year
            > or so to get big enough to put out many flowers, and it gets really big -
            > 15-17 feet tall. I suppose you could keep it pruned. :-) Cotton puts out
            a
            > lot more nectar than most plants. It blooms in Texas around the end of
            July
            > or middle of Aug. depending when it was planted. Cotton is a pretty plant
            > and the bolls look nice in a garden. Fruit trees are good in the Spring.
            I
            > like apples, cherries, and pears. I suppose you could pick what you like.
            > Again it takes 3 to 5 years to get big enough to really have a lot of
            > blooms. Alfalfa makes a lot of blooms, and bees like it. Sunflowers are
            > good too, but you will need to plant a lot of them. The trick is to find
            > several plants and stagger the blooming periods. I'm in Texas, so you'll
            > have to check out some of the crops grown in your area. Rape - used for
            > rape oil is also a good one for the spring. A lot of your good smelling
            > flowers, like roses, don't help the bees. Dandelions are another good
            > spring plant. Lots of people use them for salads. Sage blooms later in
            the
            > season and makes a good honey. I like purple sage the best. I think
            there
            > is a Russian variety that's pretty good too. You can buy wild flower
            mixes
            > at a lot of stores - I know Wally World has them. Trouble with that is
            you
            > need a pretty big space to make any difference.
            >
            > Hope this helps.
            >
            > Mark
            >
            > Mark
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "tlcrosley" <crosley@...>
            > To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 12:16 PM
            > Subject: [beekeeping] flowers
            >
            >
            > > Hi-
            > > What kinds of flowers would be good to plant in my gardens this year
            > > that would be beneficial to my bees. I live in North-Central PA.
            > > Sorry for any cross-posting.
            > > Leah
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • Reuben Watkins
            I suspect Mark meant Vitex. There are two common varieties V. negundo and V. agnus castus. Both are easy to grow from seed but will need a couple of years to
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 20, 2002
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              I suspect Mark meant Vitex. There are two common varieties V. negundo and V. agnus castus. Both are easy to grow from seed but will need a couple of years to bloom.
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: tlcrosley
              Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2002 12:35 PM
              To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [beekeeping] flowers
               
              Thanks Mark.  I've never heard of 'vitec'.  I don't think cotton will grow
              in PA, but I'd be willing to give it a try.  We have several apple trees in
              the area, as well as wild cherry.  A local hunting club has planted alfalfa
              in the past.  My husband is a member, I told him to mention planting it
              again to them.  I've haven't heard of 'rape' either.  Maybe it doesn't grow
              in this zone.  Dandelions grow everywhere here from early spring till
              mid-summer.  Sage is do-able.  We don't have 'Wally Worlds' here, but I've
              seen wildflower mixtures at Wal-Mart.  The mixes they had were: shady, full
              sun, sun & shade, butterfly, and humming bird.  Would the butterfly be ok?
              Space isn't a problem, we live on the edges of old farming fields, near
              woods.  The nearest neighbors are 1/2 - 1 mile away.
                Leah

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Mark" <mcoldiron@...>
              To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 1:44 PM
              Subject: Re: [beekeeping] flowers


              > It depends on the size of your yard and if you want the flowers THIS year.
              > If you have the room, try Vitec.  It's a woody bush with tons of flowers.
              > Bees love it and it produces a lot of nectar.  Problem is, it takes a year
              > or so to get big enough to put out many flowers, and it gets really big -
              > 15-17 feet tall.  I suppose you could keep it pruned. :-)  Cotton puts out
              a
              > lot more nectar than most plants.  It blooms in Texas around the end of
              July
              > or middle of Aug. depending when it was planted.  Cotton is a pretty plant
              > and the bolls look nice in a garden. Fruit trees are good in the Spring.
              I
              > like apples, cherries, and pears.  I suppose you could pick what you like.
              > Again it takes 3 to 5 years to get big enough to really have a lot of
              > blooms.  Alfalfa makes a lot of blooms, and bees like it.  Sunflowers are
              > good too, but you will need to plant a lot of them.  The trick is to find
              > several plants and stagger the blooming periods.  I'm in Texas, so you'll
              > have to check out some of the crops grown in your area.  Rape - used for
              > rape oil is also a good one for the spring.  A lot of your good smelling
              > flowers, like roses, don't help the bees.  Dandelions are another good
              > spring plant.  Lots of people use them for salads.  Sage blooms later in
              the
              > season and makes a good honey.  I like purple sage the best.  I think
              there
              > is a Russian variety that's pretty good too.  You can buy wild flower
              mixes
              > at a lot of stores - I know Wally World has them.  Trouble with that is
              you
              > need a pretty big space to make any difference.
              >
              > Hope this helps.
              >
              > Mark
              >
              > Mark
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: "tlcrosley" <crosley@...>
              > To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 12:16 PM
              > Subject: [beekeeping] flowers
              >
              >
              > > Hi-
              > > What kinds of flowers would be good to plant in my gardens this year
              > > that would be beneficial to my bees.  I live in North-Central PA.
              > > Sorry for any cross-posting.
              > > Leah
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >


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            • tlcrosley
              Thanks, I looked at the site. He had quite a variety! Leah ... From: Reuben Watkins To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 1:32 PM
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 20, 2002
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                Thanks, I looked at the site.  He had quite a variety!
                Leah 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 1:32 PM
                Subject: Re: [beekeeping] flowers

                There are several good resources on line. You could try a google search on "bee plants". My favorite source is beeplants.com, but they are in the midst of an overhaul. Tom Clothier has a great site and sells seed he has collected from his garden. I have had excellent results with Tom's seed. http://users.anet.com/~manytimes/
                 
                Plant all you can,
                 
                Reuben Watkin
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: tlcrosley
                Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2002 12:20 PM
                To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [beekeeping] flowers
                 
                Hi-
                What kinds of flowers would be good to plant in my gardens this year
                that would be beneficial to my bees.  I live in North-Central PA.
                Sorry for any cross-posting.
                Leah




                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/




                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
              • Mark
                ... member, I told him to mention planting it again to them. A note about alfalfa, most people who plant it are doing so for the purpose of bailing it.
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 20, 2002
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                  >A local hunting club has planted alfalfa in the past. My husband is a
                  member, I told him to mention planting it
                  again to them.

                  A note about alfalfa, most people who plant it are doing so for the purpose
                  of bailing it. Farmers know that to get the best feed for livestock, it
                  must cut it before it blooms.

                  >The mixes they had were: shady, full sun, sun & shade, butterfly, and
                  humming bird. Would the butterfly be ok?

                  Sounds like humming bird and butterfly would do just fine.

                  > Space isn't a problem, we live on the edges of old farming fields, near
                  woods. The nearest neighbors are 1/2 - 1 mile away.

                  Sounds like a good long term solution would be planting trees and bushes.
                  I'm also assuming that you are just doing this for the pleasure of watching
                  your bees. I doubt that you can plant enough to really make much difference
                  unless you plant several acres. Don't forget, bees forage up to 3 miles.
                  It also sounds like you're living in an area where the bees can find plenty
                  of nectar and pollen.

                  Hope you have fun with your bees.

                  Mark
                • Karen Oland
                  Not so for hunting clubs - they are planting it to attract deer, elk, etc. So, it is left standing and not cut (which could get them into trouble for baiting,
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 20, 2002
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                    Not so for hunting clubs - they are planting it to attract deer, elk, etc.
                    So, it is left standing and not cut (which could get them into trouble for
                    baiting, in some states, but defeats the main purpose in any case).

                    It is difficult to plant annual/legume crops in large enough sizes to
                    matter. But not shrubs and/or trees -- you just have to be (much) more
                    patient. Vitex are popular due to flowering in late summer, in what is here
                    a normal dearth.

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Mark

                    A note about alfalfa, most people who plant it are doing so for the purpose
                    of bailing it. Farmers know that to get the best feed for livestock, it
                    must cut it before it blooms.
                  • Ferguson Apiaries
                    In Ontario we tried to plant some of the best honey plants for bees. One of our men had several thousands of plants started. I have Anis hyssop , catnip ,
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jan 25, 2005
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                      In Ontario we tried to plant some of the best honey plants for bees.  One of our men had several thousands of plants started.  I have Anis hyssop , catnip , Fig wart and mountain fig wart.  I did not have as good a luck with mountain mint.  Statistics from Michigan said that a acre of Mountain Mint would look after 80 hives.
                    • James A. Ward
                      So, I am guessing that Daylilies are not a good plant for the bees. DARN! I Love Daylilies! I have never heard of Mountain Mint... where can I find some?
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jan 25, 2005
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                        So, I am guessing that Daylilies are not a good plant for the bees.  DARN!  I Love Daylilies!  I have never heard of Mountain Mint... where can I find some?
                         
                        Peace,
                        Jim
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2005 5:57 PM
                        Subject: [Norton AntiSpam] [beekeeping] flowers

                        In Ontario we tried to plant some of the best honey plants for bees.  One of our men had several thousands of plants started.  I have Anis hyssop , catnip , Fig wart and mountain fig wart.  I did not have as good a luck with mountain mint.  Statistics from Michigan said that a acre of Mountain Mint would look after 80 hives.
                      • Ted Flower
                        Hi just wondering what is the botanical name for mountain mint Ted Ferguson Apiaries wrote: In Ontario we tried to plant some of the best honey
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jan 25, 2005
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                          Hi just wondering what is the botanical name for mountain mint
                          Ted

                          Ferguson Apiaries <ferga@...> wrote:
                          In Ontario we tried to plant some of the best honey plants for bees.  One of our men had several thousands of plants started.  I have Anis hyssop , catnip , Fig wart and mountain fig wart.  I did not have as good a luck with mountain mint.  Statistics from Michigan said that a acre of Mountain Mint would look after 80 hives.



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