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Re: Queens

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  • Rmaltby@cfl.rr.com
    Thanks Charlotte. I ll give them a call. ... 352-669-3498.
    Message 1 of 25 , Mar 19, 2001
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      Thanks Charlotte. I'll give them a call.

      --- In beekeeping@y..., workwax@a... wrote:
      > Try D & J Apiaries in Umatilla, Fl 32784. Their phone number is
      352-669-3498.
      > Hope this helps. Charlotte Randall
    • workwax@aol.com
      If the other number does not work then try David Miksa in Groveland, Fl. The phone number is 429-3447. Charlotte
      Message 2 of 25 , Mar 19, 2001
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        If the other number does not work then try David Miksa in Groveland, Fl.

        The phone number is 429-3447.

        Charlotte
      • Ray Maltby
        Thanks Charlotte. Actually, I spoke with Risa at R. Weaver Aparies in Texas and she sent out a Buckfast queen yesterday. I appreciate your help. Ray Maltby ...
        Message 3 of 25 , Mar 21, 2001
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          Thanks Charlotte.
          Actually, I spoke with Risa at R. Weaver Aparies in Texas and she sent out a Buckfast queen yesterday. I appreciate your help.
          Ray Maltby
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, March 19, 2001 8:39 PM
          Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Re: Queens

          If the other number does not work then try David Miksa in Groveland, Fl.

          The phone number is 429-3447.

          Charlotte


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        • Ferguson Apiaries
          In Ontario the beekeepers had originally worked with NY beekeepers to develop a trachea mite resistant bee. We have been very successful. I tested my bees
          Message 4 of 25 , Jun 1, 2004
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            In Ontario the beekeepers had originally worked with NY beekeepers to develop a trachea mite resistant bee.  We have been very successful.  I tested my bees this spring in several yards and out of 300 slices for trachea and in the other 1 out of 300 bees sampled. It cost less than $150 to test but is well worth it as it saved $2000 in treatment.
             
            We are presently working on hygienic and trying to incorporate it into the stock,  Anything over 75% should control AFB.  We encouraged people to breed and raise there own stock and to exchange with good stock from other breeders.  It is a good idea to raise your own stock from proven lines and to trade at your local clubs.
          • LaRae Pranter
            If my queen is marked, how long will she stay marked? Is one method better than another? Also...why would one need to use a queen cell protector? What are
            Message 5 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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              If my queen is marked, how long will she stay marked?   Is one method better than another?
               
              Also...why would one need to use a queen cell protector?
               
              What are queen clipping sissors used for?  
               
               
              LaRae 
            • LEW BEST
              See below Lew ... From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LaRae Pranter Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 11:21 AM To:
              Message 6 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                See below

                 

                Lew

                 

                -----Original Message-----
                From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LaRae Pranter
                Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 11:21 AM
                To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [beekeeping] Queens

                 

                If my queen is marked, how long will she stay marked?   Is one method better than another?

                For life; the colored spot on her thorax is a certain color for each year so you can tell her age.  Also maker easy to find if you want to.

                 

                Also...why would one need to use a queen cell protector?

                Used some way in queen rearing; not sure how.

                 

                What are queen clipping sissors used for?

                Some feel clipping one wing will keep the queen from flying off with a swarm.  Controversial; most feel that a virgin queen will leave with a swarm anyway if the hive gets in the “swarming mood.”

                 

                Lew

                  

                 

                 

                LaRae 

                 

              • jens_khan
                ... method better than another? A: Normally for life which is a couple of years. ... A: The queen cell protector is a little cage around the queen cells when
                Message 7 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                  --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "LaRae Pranter"
                  <prantersacres@t...> wrote:
                  > If my queen is marked, how long will she stay marked? Is one
                  method better than another?

                  A: Normally for life which is a couple of years.
                  >
                  > Also...why would one need to use a queen cell protector?

                  A: The queen cell protector is a little cage around the queen cells
                  when you rear queens. You put it on when the cell is capped. It keep
                  the queen locked in when she crawls out of the cell. If you don't do
                  it the newly crawled queen will kill the queens in the other cells
                  before she does anything else.
                  >
                  > What are queen clipping sissors used for?

                  A: When the queen has finished her mating flight one wing is cut to
                  prevent the queen from flying. When bees swarm it is the old queen who
                  leaves the hive with about half of the bees. I one wing is cut she
                  will fall down just outside the hive and the bees will go back into
                  the hive.
                  The old queen leaves the hive a day or two before the new queen
                  crawls. If she stayed she would be killed by the new queen as she is
                  not able to defend herself - her venom has hardenedand cannot be used.

                  Jens
                  >
                  >
                  > LaRae
                • LaRae Pranter
                  Hmmmmm interesting...so I just have to learn to identify the queen body and the mark on her thorax. At the beekeepers meeting last week, it was discussed about
                  Message 8 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                    Hmmmmm interesting...so I just have to learn to identify the queen body and the mark on her thorax.
                     
                    At the beekeepers meeting last week, it was discussed about how a couple people lost bees because their queen was a virgin.   I wonder why bees sometime don't like a virgin queen?
                     
                     
                    LaRae
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: LEW BEST
                    Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 12:30 PM
                    Subject: RE: [beekeeping] Queens

                    See below

                     

                    Lew

                     

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LaRae Pranter
                    Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 11:21 AM
                    To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [beekeeping] Queens

                     

                    If my queen is marked, how long will she stay marked?   Is one method better than another?

                    For life; the colored spot on her thorax is a certain color for each year so you can tell her age.  Also maker easy to find if you want to.

                     

                    Also...why would one need to use a queen cell protector?

                    Used some way in queen rearing; not sure how.

                     

                    What are queen clipping sissors used for?

                    Some feel clipping one wing will keep the queen from flying off with a swarm.  Controversial; most feel that a virgin queen will leave with a swarm anyway if the hive gets in the “swarming mood.”

                     

                    Lew

                      

                     

                     

                    LaRae 

                     

                  • LaRae Pranter
                    Now I ve heard some people don t re-queen for 3 or 4 years (or whenver the queen stops working)....then other re-queen every single year no matter what. So
                    Message 9 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                      Now I've heard some people don't re-queen for 3 or 4 years (or whenver the
                      queen stops working)....then other re-queen every single year no matter
                      what.

                      So what are the advantages and disadvantages to both practices?

                      I see...so a queen protector cell would be a good thing to have if you are
                      in the business of raising queens.

                      LaRae
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "jens_khan" <jens_khan@...>
                      To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 1:16 PM
                      Subject: [beekeeping] Re: Queens


                      > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "LaRae Pranter"
                      > <prantersacres@t...> wrote:
                      >> If my queen is marked, how long will she stay marked? Is one
                      > method better than another?
                      >
                      > A: Normally for life which is a couple of years.
                      >>
                      >> Also...why would one need to use a queen cell protector?
                      >
                      > A: The queen cell protector is a little cage around the queen cells
                      > when you rear queens. You put it on when the cell is capped. It keep
                      > the queen locked in when she crawls out of the cell. If you don't do
                      > it the newly crawled queen will kill the queens in the other cells
                      > before she does anything else.
                      >>
                      >> What are queen clipping sissors used for?
                      >
                      > A: When the queen has finished her mating flight one wing is cut to
                      > prevent the queen from flying. When bees swarm it is the old queen who
                      > leaves the hive with about half of the bees. I one wing is cut she
                      > will fall down just outside the hive and the bees will go back into
                      > the hive.
                      > The old queen leaves the hive a day or two before the new queen
                      > crawls. If she stayed she would be killed by the new queen as she is
                      > not able to defend herself - her venom has hardenedand cannot be used.
                      >
                      > Jens
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> LaRae
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • jens_khan
                      Normally a queen has a fine production the year she is raised and the next two years but she can go on longer it depends among other things on the amount of
                      Message 10 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                        Normally a queen has a fine production the year she is raised and the
                        next two years but she can go on longer it depends among other things
                        on the amount of semen she stored when she was mated. Normally the
                        queen mates with 7-8 drones, but in bad weather she can start laying
                        after only mating with a couple of drones.
                        The commercial beekeepers I know change 60-70 percent of the queens
                        every year.

                        Jens

                        --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "LaRae Pranter"
                        <prantersacres@t...> wrote:
                        > Now I've heard some people don't re-queen for 3 or 4 years (or
                        whenver the
                        > queen stops working)....then other re-queen every single year no matter
                        > what.
                        >
                        > So what are the advantages and disadvantages to both practices?
                        >
                        > I see...so a queen protector cell would be a good thing to have if
                        you are
                        > in the business of raising queens.
                        >
                        > LaRae
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: "jens_khan" <jens_khan@h...>
                        > To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
                        > Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 1:16 PM
                        > Subject: [beekeeping] Re: Queens
                        >
                        >
                        > > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "LaRae Pranter"
                        > > <prantersacres@t...> wrote:
                        > >> If my queen is marked, how long will she stay marked? Is one
                        > > method better than another?
                        > >
                        > > A: Normally for life which is a couple of years.
                        > >>
                        > >> Also...why would one need to use a queen cell protector?
                        > >
                        > > A: The queen cell protector is a little cage around the queen cells
                        > > when you rear queens. You put it on when the cell is capped. It keep
                        > > the queen locked in when she crawls out of the cell. If you don't do
                        > > it the newly crawled queen will kill the queens in the other cells
                        > > before she does anything else.
                        > >>
                        > >> What are queen clipping sissors used for?
                        > >
                        > > A: When the queen has finished her mating flight one wing is cut to
                        > > prevent the queen from flying. When bees swarm it is the old queen who
                        > > leaves the hive with about half of the bees. I one wing is cut she
                        > > will fall down just outside the hive and the bees will go back into
                        > > the hive.
                        > > The old queen leaves the hive a day or two before the new queen
                        > > crawls. If she stayed she would be killed by the new queen as she is
                        > > not able to defend herself - her venom has hardenedand cannot be used.
                        > >
                        > > Jens
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >> LaRae
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                      • D.O.
                        Some people think that a young queen is more productive and the colony is less likely to swarm. Also, a less productive queen might make the bees a bit more
                        Message 11 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                          Some people think that a young queen is more
                          productive and the colony is less likely to swarm.
                          Also, a less productive queen might make the bees a
                          bit more edgy. I haven't read any research on these
                          topics.

                          Replacing a queen isn't expensive, and gives hobbyists
                          a good reason to spend some time out with the bees.

                          --- LaRae Pranter <prantersacres@...> wrote:
                          > Now I've heard some people don't re-queen for 3 or 4
                          > years (or whenver the
                          > queen stops working)....then other re-queen every
                          > single year no matter
                          > what.
                          >
                          > So what are the advantages and disadvantages to both
                          > practices?
                          >
                          > I see...so a queen protector cell would be a good
                          > thing to have if you are
                          > in the business of raising queens.
                          >
                          > LaRae
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: "jens_khan" <jens_khan@...>
                          > To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
                          > Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 1:16 PM
                          > Subject: [beekeeping] Re: Queens
                          >
                          >
                          > > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "LaRae Pranter"
                          > > <prantersacres@t...> wrote:
                          > >> If my queen is marked, how long will she stay
                          > marked? Is one
                          > > method better than another?
                          > >
                          > > A: Normally for life which is a couple of years.
                          > >>
                          > >> Also...why would one need to use a queen cell
                          > protector?
                          > >
                          > > A: The queen cell protector is a little cage
                          > around the queen cells
                          > > when you rear queens. You put it on when the cell
                          > is capped. It keep
                          > > the queen locked in when she crawls out of the
                          > cell. If you don't do
                          > > it the newly crawled queen will kill the queens in
                          > the other cells
                          > > before she does anything else.
                          > >>
                          > >> What are queen clipping sissors used for?
                          > >
                          > > A: When the queen has finished her mating flight
                          > one wing is cut to
                          > > prevent the queen from flying. When bees swarm it
                          > is the old queen who
                          > > leaves the hive with about half of the bees. I one
                          > wing is cut she
                          > > will fall down just outside the hive and the bees
                          > will go back into
                          > > the hive.
                          > > The old queen leaves the hive a day or two before
                          > the new queen
                          > > crawls. If she stayed she would be killed by the
                          > new queen as she is
                          > > not able to defend herself - her venom has
                          > hardenedand cannot be used.
                          > >
                          > > Jens
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> LaRae
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >
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                        • LaRae Pranter
                          Ok I gotta ask...does anyone feel bad when they have to kill one of their queens to replace them? I m well aware of the necessity of culling etc, we have
                          Message 12 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                            Ok I gotta ask...does anyone feel 'bad' when they have to kill one of their
                            queens to replace them? I'm well aware of the necessity of culling etc, we
                            have to do it also with our other animals....but I do always feel kinda bad
                            about it too.

                            Interesting about the commercial beekeepers, from a business standpoint it
                            would seem to make sense.


                            LaRae

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: "jens_khan" <jens_khan@...>
                            To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 2:01 PM
                            Subject: [beekeeping] Re: Queens


                            > Normally a queen has a fine production the year she is raised and the
                            > next two years but she can go on longer it depends among other things
                            > on the amount of semen she stored when she was mated. Normally the
                            > queen mates with 7-8 drones, but in bad weather she can start laying
                            > after only mating with a couple of drones.
                            > The commercial beekeepers I know change 60-70 percent of the queens
                            > every year.
                            >
                            > Jens
                            >
                            > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "LaRae Pranter"
                            > <prantersacres@t...> wrote:
                            >> Now I've heard some people don't re-queen for 3 or 4 years (or
                            > whenver the
                            >> queen stops working)....then other re-queen every single year no matter
                            >> what.
                            >>
                            >> So what are the advantages and disadvantages to both practices?
                            >>
                            >> I see...so a queen protector cell would be a good thing to have if
                            > you are
                            >> in the business of raising queens.
                            >>
                            >> LaRae
                            >> ----- Original Message -----
                            >> From: "jens_khan" <jens_khan@h...>
                            >> To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
                            >> Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 1:16 PM
                            >> Subject: [beekeeping] Re: Queens
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "LaRae Pranter"
                            >> > <prantersacres@t...> wrote:
                            >> >> If my queen is marked, how long will she stay marked? Is one
                            >> > method better than another?
                            >> >
                            >> > A: Normally for life which is a couple of years.
                            >> >>
                            >> >> Also...why would one need to use a queen cell protector?
                            >> >
                            >> > A: The queen cell protector is a little cage around the queen cells
                            >> > when you rear queens. You put it on when the cell is capped. It keep
                            >> > the queen locked in when she crawls out of the cell. If you don't do
                            >> > it the newly crawled queen will kill the queens in the other cells
                            >> > before she does anything else.
                            >> >>
                            >> >> What are queen clipping sissors used for?
                            >> >
                            >> > A: When the queen has finished her mating flight one wing is cut to
                            >> > prevent the queen from flying. When bees swarm it is the old queen who
                            >> > leaves the hive with about half of the bees. I one wing is cut she
                            >> > will fall down just outside the hive and the bees will go back into
                            >> > the hive.
                            >> > The old queen leaves the hive a day or two before the new queen
                            >> > crawls. If she stayed she would be killed by the new queen as she is
                            >> > not able to defend herself - her venom has hardenedand cannot be used.
                            >> >
                            >> > Jens
                            >> >>
                            >> >>
                            >> >> LaRae
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >> >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
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                          • LaRae Pranter
                            How much do queens normally cost? I ve heard around 15.00? LaRae ... From: D.O. To: Sent: Friday, April 29,
                            Message 13 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                              How much do queens normally cost? I've heard around 15.00?


                              LaRae

                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "D.O." <kg6mvx@...>
                              To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 2:05 PM
                              Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Re: Queens


                              >
                              > Some people think that a young queen is more
                              > productive and the colony is less likely to swarm.
                              > Also, a less productive queen might make the bees a
                              > bit more edgy. I haven't read any research on these
                              > topics.
                              >
                              > Replacing a queen isn't expensive, and gives hobbyists
                              > a good reason to spend some time out with the bees.
                              >
                              > --- LaRae Pranter <prantersacres@...> wrote:
                              >> Now I've heard some people don't re-queen for 3 or 4
                              >> years (or whenver the
                              >> queen stops working)....then other re-queen every
                              >> single year no matter
                              >> what.
                              >>
                              >> So what are the advantages and disadvantages to both
                              >> practices?
                              >>
                              >> I see...so a queen protector cell would be a good
                              >> thing to have if you are
                              >> in the business of raising queens.
                              >>
                              >> LaRae
                              >> ----- Original Message -----
                              >> From: "jens_khan" <jens_khan@...>
                              >> To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
                              >> Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 1:16 PM
                              >> Subject: [beekeeping] Re: Queens
                              >>
                              >>
                              >> > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "LaRae Pranter"
                              >> > <prantersacres@t...> wrote:
                              >> >> If my queen is marked, how long will she stay
                              >> marked? Is one
                              >> > method better than another?
                              >> >
                              >> > A: Normally for life which is a couple of years.
                              >> >>
                              >> >> Also...why would one need to use a queen cell
                              >> protector?
                              >> >
                              >> > A: The queen cell protector is a little cage
                              >> around the queen cells
                              >> > when you rear queens. You put it on when the cell
                              >> is capped. It keep
                              >> > the queen locked in when she crawls out of the
                              >> cell. If you don't do
                              >> > it the newly crawled queen will kill the queens in
                              >> the other cells
                              >> > before she does anything else.
                              >> >>
                              >> >> What are queen clipping sissors used for?
                              >> >
                              >> > A: When the queen has finished her mating flight
                              >> one wing is cut to
                              >> > prevent the queen from flying. When bees swarm it
                              >> is the old queen who
                              >> > leaves the hive with about half of the bees. I one
                              >> wing is cut she
                              >> > will fall down just outside the hive and the bees
                              >> will go back into
                              >> > the hive.
                              >> > The old queen leaves the hive a day or two before
                              >> the new queen
                              >> > crawls. If she stayed she would be killed by the
                              >> new queen as she is
                              >> > not able to defend herself - her venom has
                              >> hardenedand cannot be used.
                              >> >
                              >> > Jens
                              >> >>
                              >> >>
                              >> >> LaRae
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >> >
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >> ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                              >> --------------------~-->
                              >> What would our lives be like without music, dance,
                              >> and theater?
                              >> Donate or volunteer in the arts today at Network for
                              >> Good!
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                            • LEW BEST
                              The blue (this year s color) spot stands out; nothing in the hive the color of the marked queen so VERY easy to see! Virgin queen can t lay fertile eggs;
                              Message 14 of 25 , Apr 29, 2005
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                                The blue (this year’s color) spot stands out; nothing in the hive the color of the marked queen so VERY easy to see!

                                 

                                Virgin queen can’t lay fertile eggs; summer workers only live about 6 weeks so colony dies.

                                 

                                Lew

                                 

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LaRae Pranter
                                Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 1:52 PM
                                To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Queens

                                 

                                Hmmmmm interesting...so I just have to learn to identify the queen body and the mark on her thorax.

                                 

                                At the beekeepers meeting last week, it was discussed about how a couple people lost bees because their queen was a virgin.   I wonder why bees sometime don't like a virgin queen?

                                 

                                 

                                LaRae

                                ----- Original Message -----

                                From: LEW BEST

                                Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 12:30 PM

                                Subject: RE: [beekeeping] Queens

                                 

                                See below

                                 

                                Lew

                                 

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:beekeeping@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of LaRae Pranter
                                Sent: Friday, April 29, 2005 11:21 AM
                                To: beekeeping@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: [beekeeping] Queens

                                 

                                If my queen is marked, how long will she stay marked?   Is one method better than another?

                                For life; the colored spot on her thorax is a certain color for each year so you can tell her age.  Also maker easy to find if you want to.

                                 

                                Also...why would one need to use a queen cell protector?

                                Used some way in queen rearing; not sure how.

                                 

                                What are queen clipping sissors used for?

                                Some feel clipping one wing will keep the queen from flying off with a swarm.  Controversial; most feel that a virgin queen will leave with a swarm anyway if the hive gets in the “swarming mood.”

                                 

                                Lew

                                  

                                 

                                 

                                LaRae 

                                 

                                 

                              • FarmerBrown49@aol.com
                                I know most people re-queen in the spring and that is why I am witting this now. I am looking for a few exceptional Italian queens for this coming spring. I
                                Message 15 of 25 , Oct 10, 2005
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                                  I know most people re-queen in the spring and that is why I am witting this now.  I am looking for a few exceptional Italian queens for this coming spring.  I am not interested in any other bread other than Italians.  I am looking for queens that have a very good laying pattern and lay in 20+ frames.  Will conceder queens that lay in as few as 18 frames.
                                  Please send me the information about the queens which meet these requirements you plan to replace next spring with younger queens.  Please state asking price and date they will be available.  Please send the information to me off List at FarmerBrown49@...  
                                   
                                  Thank You
                                  Sammy
                                  Our web site: http://www.brownsbees.com  or
                                  http://brownsapiaries.com/
                                  Other screen names I can be reached at: sammy@..., farmerbrown49@..., ASamBrown@... Host your Web site with BizLand!
                                • russell spencer
                                  hey all any tips on raiseingQUEENS. CAUSE @ THE PRICE OF QUEENS i HAVE HAD IT .AM GOING TO RAISE MY OWN. ALSO I HAVE FOUND A PLACE FULL OF WILD BEES HUNDREDS
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Jan 29, 2008
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                                    hey all any tips on raiseingQUEENS.
                                    CAUSE @ THE PRICE OF QUEENS i HAVE HAD IT .AM GOING TO RAISE MY OWN.
                                      ALSO I HAVE FOUND A PLACE FULL OF WILD BEES HUNDREDS OF COLONIES.IN THE FOREST.AT ABOVE 5000' ELEVATION.CAPTURED SEVERAL LAST SPRING.NO MITES.BUT WHAT ABOUT OTHER ILLNESS.WOULD THEY HAVE THEM.AND WOULD THEY BE A GOOD STOCK TO RAISE QUEENS FROM.
                                     ALSO THEY APPEAR TO B JUST A TAD SMALLER THAN THE BEES I HAVE.WHEN PUT SIDE BY SIDE.AND THEY REALLY PRODUCE HONEY AND BROOD.WHY IS THIS.
                                     CAN'T FIGURE OUT BREED.THEY ARE QUITE DARKER THAN MY CANOLIANS AND ITALIANS.
                                     HAVE 100 NUKES AND QUEEN LURES TO TRY AND CATCH MORE SWARMS FROM THEY HIVES I FOUND LAST YR SO ANY ADVISE WOULD BE MORE THAN WELCOME.


                                    Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
                                  • Pete
                                    Hi Russell Commercial foundation is larger than natural comb, and some argue smaller bees are healthier. I would give them small starter strips of 4.9 size
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Jan 29, 2008
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                                      Hi Russell

                                      Commercial foundation is larger than natural comb, and some argue
                                      smaller bees are healthier.

                                      I would give them small starter strips of 4.9 size foundation and
                                      let them draw their own natural comb.


                                      Regards

                                      Peter
                                      Cambridge UK



                                      --- In Beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, russell spencer
                                      <beekeeper121@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > hey all any tips on raiseingQUEENS.
                                      > CAUSE @ THE PRICE OF QUEENS i HAVE HAD IT .AM GOING TO RAISE MY
                                      OWN.
                                      > ALSO I HAVE FOUND A PLACE FULL OF WILD BEES HUNDREDS OF
                                      COLONIES.IN THE FOREST.AT ABOVE 5000' ELEVATION.CAPTURED SEVERAL
                                      LAST SPRING.NO MITES.BUT WHAT ABOUT OTHER ILLNESS.WOULD THEY HAVE
                                      THEM.AND WOULD THEY BE A GOOD STOCK TO RAISE QUEENS FROM.
                                      > ALSO THEY APPEAR TO B JUST A TAD SMALLER THAN THE BEES I
                                      HAVE.WHEN PUT SIDE BY SIDE.AND THEY REALLY PRODUCE HONEY AND
                                      BROOD.WHY IS THIS.
                                      > CAN'T FIGURE OUT BREED.THEY ARE QUITE DARKER THAN MY CANOLIANS
                                      AND ITALIANS.
                                      > HAVE 100 NUKES AND QUEEN LURES TO TRY AND CATCH MORE SWARMS
                                      FROM THEY HIVES I FOUND LAST YR SO ANY ADVISE WOULD BE MORE THAN
                                      WELCOME.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ---------------------------------
                                      > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
                                      >
                                    • russell spencer
                                      a footnote these bees are isolated and live in sandstone formations and cliffs.as near as I can find out there has been no beekeeper in area for over 20
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Jan 29, 2008
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                                        a footnote these bees are isolated and live in sandstone formations and cliffs.as near as I can find out there has been no beekeeper in area for over 20 rys.1983.was last time a beekeeper was in area


                                        Pete <intelpete@...> wrote:
                                        Hi Russell

                                        Commercial foundation is larger than natural comb, and some argue
                                        smaller bees are healthier.

                                        I would give them small starter strips of 4.9 size foundation and
                                        let them draw their own natural comb.

                                        Regards

                                        Peter
                                        Cambridge UK

                                        --- In Beekeeping@yahoogro ups.com, russell spencer
                                        <beekeeper121@ ...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > hey all any tips on raiseingQUEENS.
                                        > CAUSE @ THE PRICE OF QUEENS i HAVE HAD IT .AM GOING TO RAISE MY
                                        OWN.
                                        > ALSO I HAVE FOUND A PLACE FULL OF WILD BEES HUNDREDS OF
                                        COLONIES.IN THE FOREST.AT ABOVE 5000' ELEVATION.CAPTURED SEVERAL
                                        LAST SPRING.NO MITES.BUT WHAT ABOUT OTHER ILLNESS.WOULD THEY HAVE
                                        THEM.AND WOULD THEY BE A GOOD STOCK TO RAISE QUEENS FROM.
                                        > ALSO THEY APPEAR TO B JUST A TAD SMALLER THAN THE BEES I
                                        HAVE.WHEN PUT SIDE BY SIDE.AND THEY REALLY PRODUCE HONEY AND
                                        BROOD.WHY IS THIS.
                                        > CAN'T FIGURE OUT BREED.THEY ARE QUITE DARKER THAN MY CANOLIANS
                                        AND ITALIANS.
                                        > HAVE 100 NUKES AND QUEEN LURES TO TRY AND CATCH MORE SWARMS
                                        FROM THEY HIVES I FOUND LAST YR SO ANY ADVISE WOULD BE MORE THAN
                                        WELCOME.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > ------------ --------- --------- ---
                                        > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
                                        >



                                        Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

                                      • axeman axeman
                                        What area??? Alan, Lakeview, NY ... ____________________________________________________________________________________ Be a better friend, newshound, and
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Jan 29, 2008
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                                          What area???

                                          Alan, Lakeview, NY
                                          --- russell spencer <beekeeper121@...> wrote:

                                          > a footnote these bees are isolated and live in
                                          > sandstone formations and cliffs.as near as I can
                                          > find out there has been no beekeeper in area for
                                          > over 20 rys.1983.was last time a beekeeper was in
                                          > area
                                          >
                                          >



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