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Bees in shock?

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  • molnar_louispatricia
    After taking a swarm, apparently without the queen, all the queen less bees took off seemingly during the night. We received a call from the same person, went
    Message 1 of 8 , May 5, 2005
      After taking a swarm, apparently without the queen, all the queen less
      bees took off seemingly during the night.
      We received a call from the same person, went back and rescued what we
      think was the queen and a handful of bees. (During our rescue with the
      B-Vac I think the queen hid during the activity) They have been with us
      for about a week now and we have not noticed anything happening. We
      gave them honeycomb and some pollen mixed with honey that came from the
      hive (these very bees produced) where we rescued this swarm. Is there
      a chance that the queen will begin her egg laying again or is she still
      in a state of shock, if bees go into such a state.
      I am concerned that the bees she has around her will die off before she
      has a chance to produce new bees.
      These bees are not in a hive body with frames. They are in a cardboard
      box and we placed one frame in there for them and applied the pollen
      honey mix, or royal jelly, that which I believe is used to feed the
      queen and new bees. Should we move them again into a regular hive body
      and just hope for the best?
      Pat
    • jens_khan
      Put the bees in a hive and then add a frame with eggs from another hive. If the bees start making queen cells they are either without a queen or something is
      Message 2 of 8 , May 5, 2005
        Put the bees in a hive and then add a frame with eggs from another
        hive. If the bees start making queen cells they are either without a
        queen or something is wrong with the queen. You should do this as soon
        as possible while there are still young bees to feed larvae and the
        coming queen.

        Jens


        --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "molnar_louispatricia"
        <molnar_louispatricia@y...> wrote:
        > After taking a swarm, apparently without the queen, all the queen less
        > bees took off seemingly during the night.
        > We received a call from the same person, went back and rescued what we
        > think was the queen and a handful of bees. (During our rescue with the
        > B-Vac I think the queen hid during the activity) They have been with us
        > for about a week now and we have not noticed anything happening. We
        > gave them honeycomb and some pollen mixed with honey that came from the
        > hive (these very bees produced) where we rescued this swarm. Is there
        > a chance that the queen will begin her egg laying again or is she still
        > in a state of shock, if bees go into such a state.
        > I am concerned that the bees she has around her will die off before she
        > has a chance to produce new bees.
        > These bees are not in a hive body with frames. They are in a cardboard
        > box and we placed one frame in there for them and applied the pollen
        > honey mix, or royal jelly, that which I believe is used to feed the
        > queen and new bees. Should we move them again into a regular hive body
        > and just hope for the best?
        > Pat
      • Louis/Patricia Molnar
        Jens, Where in the hive would I find the frame with eggs? And will I be robbing all the eggs from the other hive? Is it best to do this in the evening or
        Message 3 of 8 , May 5, 2005
          Jens,
          Where in the hive would I find the frame with eggs?  And will I be robbing all the eggs from the other hive?  Is it best to do this in the evening or early am.
          Pat

          jens_khan <jens_khan@...> wrote:
          Put the bees in a hive and then add a frame with eggs from another
          hive. If the bees start making queen cells they are either without a
          queen or something is wrong with the queen. You should do this as soon
          as possible while there are still young bees to feed larvae and the
          coming queen.

          Jens


          --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "molnar_louispatricia"
          <molnar_louispatricia@y...> wrote:
          > After taking a swarm, apparently without the queen, all the queen less
          > bees took off seemingly during the night. 
          > We received a call from the same person, went back and rescued what we
          > think was the queen and a handful of bees.  (During our rescue with the
          > B-Vac I think the queen hid during the activity) They have been with us
          > for about a week now and we have not noticed anything happening.  We
          > gave them honeycomb and some pollen mixed with honey that came from the
          > hive (these very bees produced) where we rescued this swarm.  Is there
          > a chance that the queen will begin her egg laying again or is she still
          > in a state of shock, if bees go into such a state.
          > I am concerned that the bees she has around her will die off before she
          > has a chance to produce new bees.
          > These bees are not in a hive body with frames.  They are in a cardboard
          > box and we placed one frame in there for them and applied the pollen
          > honey mix, or royal jelly, that which I believe is used to feed the
          > queen and new bees.  Should we move them again into a regular hive body
          > and just hope for the best?
          > Pat



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        • Jon McFadden
          Pat, When you rescue a swarm, it s always a good idea to verify where the queen is. In the last two weeks, my son and I have rescued three swarms. Each was
          Message 4 of 8 , May 5, 2005
            Pat,
            When you "rescue" a swarm, it's always a good idea to
            verify where the queen is.
            In the last two weeks, my son and I have "rescued"
            three swarms. Each was a different scenario.
            Only one was typical. This swarm was about 14 feet in
            up in a Pin Oak tree.
            We tied a piece of string to the limb they were on.
            Will borrowed a ladder from the homeowner. He then
            climbed to the top of the ladder and held the nuc
            under the cluster. As soon as he was in position, I
            gave the limb a quick shake. Down the came. Bullseye!
            Will climbed down, leaving the nuc on the top of the
            ladder. We were 90% sure the queen was in there, but
            we waited until the bees on the limb confirmed it for
            us.
            Jon


            --- molnar_louispatricia
            <molnar_louispatricia@...> wrote:
            > After taking a swarm, apparently without the queen,
            > all the queen less
            > bees took off seemingly during the night.
            > We received a call from the same person, went back
            > and rescued what we
            > think was the queen and a handful of bees. (During
            > our rescue with the
            > B-Vac I think the queen hid during the activity)
            > They have been with us
            > for about a week now and we have not noticed
            > anything happening. We
            > gave them honeycomb and some pollen mixed with honey
            > that came from the
            > hive (these very bees produced) where we rescued
            > this swarm. Is there
            > a chance that the queen will begin her egg laying
            > again or is she still
            > in a state of shock, if bees go into such a state.
            > I am concerned that the bees she has around her will
            > die off before she
            > has a chance to produce new bees.
            > These bees are not in a hive body with frames. They
            > are in a cardboard
            > box and we placed one frame in there for them and
            > applied the pollen
            > honey mix, or royal jelly, that which I believe is
            > used to feed the
            > queen and new bees. Should we move them again into
            > a regular hive body
            > and just hope for the best?
            > Pat
            >
            >
            >
            >



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          • Jon McFadden
            Pat, If this is the same swarm that was under the sink by the pool, cutting the comb out and fixing it into frames with cotton string would have been the best
            Message 5 of 8 , May 5, 2005
              Pat,
              If this is the same swarm that was under the sink by
              the pool, cutting the comb out and fixing it into
              frames with cotton string would have been the best way
              to proceed. Doing it this way, the queen would have
              probably been moved to the hive without your even
              seeing her.
              Queens are delicate creatures. When you catch one,
              hold her by the wings.
              Jon

              --- molnar_louispatricia
              <molnar_louispatricia@...> wrote:
              > After taking a swarm, apparently without the queen,
              > all the queen less
              > bees took off seemingly during the night.
              > We received a call from the same person, went back
              > and rescued what we
              > think was the queen and a handful of bees. (During
              > our rescue with the
              > B-Vac I think the queen hid during the activity)
              > They have been with us
              > for about a week now and we have not noticed
              > anything happening. We
              > gave them honeycomb and some pollen mixed with honey
              > that came from the
              > hive (these very bees produced) where we rescued
              > this swarm. Is there
              > a chance that the queen will begin her egg laying
              > again or is she still
              > in a state of shock, if bees go into such a state.
              > I am concerned that the bees she has around her will
              > die off before she
              > has a chance to produce new bees.
              > These bees are not in a hive body with frames. They
              > are in a cardboard
              > box and we placed one frame in there for them and
              > applied the pollen
              > honey mix, or royal jelly, that which I believe is
              > used to feed the
              > queen and new bees. Should we move them again into
              > a regular hive body
              > and just hope for the best?
              > Pat
              >
              >
              >
              >



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            • Jon McFadden
              Pat, You ll be looking for frames that don t have capped brood. Do this during the heat of the day so the brood doesn t get chilled. If you hold the frame
              Message 6 of 8 , May 5, 2005
                Pat,
                You'll be looking for frames that don't have capped
                brood. Do this during the heat of the day so the brood
                doesn't get chilled. If you hold the frame
                horizontally (something you shouldn't do with a TBF)
                and look into the cells, you will be able to see
                something in the bottom of the open cells; eggs and
                larvae. When you find a frame with eggs, be watchful
                because the queen may be on this frame. Make sure you
                don't transfer her to the new colony.
                Jon

                --- Louis/Patricia Molnar
                <molnar_louispatricia@...> wrote:
                > Jens,
                > Where in the hive would I find the frame with eggs?
                > And will I be robbing all the eggs from the other
                > hive? Is it best to do this in the evening or early
                > am.
                > Pat
                >
                > jens_khan <jens_khan@...> wrote:
                > Put the bees in a hive and then add a frame with
                > eggs from another
                > hive. If the bees start making queen cells they are
                > either without a
                > queen or something is wrong with the queen. You
                > should do this as soon
                > as possible while there are still young bees to feed
                > larvae and the
                > coming queen.
                >
                > Jens
                >
                >
                > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com,
                > "molnar_louispatricia"
                > <molnar_louispatricia@y...> wrote:
                > > After taking a swarm, apparently without the
                > queen, all the queen less
                > > bees took off seemingly during the night.
                > > We received a call from the same person, went back
                > and rescued what we
                > > think was the queen and a handful of bees.
                > (During our rescue with the
                > > B-Vac I think the queen hid during the activity)
                > They have been with us
                > > for about a week now and we have not noticed
                > anything happening. We
                > > gave them honeycomb and some pollen mixed with
                > honey that came from the
                > > hive (these very bees produced) where we rescued
                > this swarm. Is there
                > > a chance that the queen will begin her egg laying
                > again or is she still
                > > in a state of shock, if bees go into such a state.
                > > I am concerned that the bees she has around her
                > will die off before she
                > > has a chance to produce new bees.
                > > These bees are not in a hive body with frames.
                > They are in a cardboard
                > > box and we placed one frame in there for them and
                > applied the pollen
                > > honey mix, or royal jelly, that which I believe is
                > used to feed the
                > > queen and new bees. Should we move them again
                > into a regular hive body
                > > and just hope for the best?
                > > Pat
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ---------------------------------
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beekeeping/
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > beekeeping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                >
                >
                >
                >
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              • Louis/Patricia Molnar
                Hi Jon, We lost all the hives we had during the past years hurricane season. The oldest hive we now have in the back yard has been here for barely a month, and
                Message 7 of 8 , May 5, 2005
                  Hi Jon,
                  We lost all the hives we had during the past years hurricane season. 
                  The oldest hive we now have in the back yard has been here for barely a month, and there will not be enough eggs or larve for me to take.  We will have to wait and see what will happen to these few. 
                  I thought I could just take a frame from the oldest hive and put them in with the few.  Looks like I was mistaken. 
                  I forgot to mention this in my posts.
                  My husband has been a keeper for much longer than I.  My association with bees was waaaay back when I had purchased an entire hive 2 supers high for $50. And I have to be reintroduced to bee keeping. 
                  I enjoy this group, I am learning from it and my husband.
                  Pat

                  Jon McFadden <n6vc@...> wrote:
                  Pat,
                  You'll be looking for frames that don't have capped
                  brood. Do this during the heat of the day so the brood
                  doesn't get chilled. If you hold the frame
                  horizontally (something you shouldn't do with a TBF)
                  and look into the cells, you will be able to see
                  something in the bottom of the open cells; eggs and
                  larvae. When you find a frame with eggs, be watchful
                  because the queen may be on this frame. Make sure you
                  don't transfer her to the new colony.
                  Jon

                  --- Louis/Patricia Molnar
                  <molnar_louispatricia@...> wrote:
                  > Jens,
                  > Where in the hive would I find the frame with eggs?
                  > And will I be robbing all the eggs from the other
                  > hive?  Is it best to do this in the evening or early
                  > am.
                  > Pat
                  >
                  > jens_khan <jens_khan@...> wrote:
                  > Put the bees in a hive and then add a frame with
                  > eggs from another
                  > hive. If the bees start making queen cells they are
                  > either without a
                  > queen or something is wrong with the queen. You
                  > should do this as soon
                  > as possible while there are still young bees to feed
                  > larvae and the
                  > coming queen.
                  >
                  > Jens
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com,
                  > "molnar_louispatricia"
                  > <molnar_louispatricia@y...> wrote:
                  > > After taking a swarm, apparently without the
                  > queen, all the queen less
                  > > bees took off seemingly during the night. 
                  > > We received a call from the same person, went back
                  > and rescued what we
                  > > think was the queen and a handful of bees.
                  > (During our rescue with the
                  > > B-Vac I think the queen hid during the activity)
                  > They have been with us
                  > > for about a week now and we have not noticed
                  > anything happening.  We
                  > > gave them honeycomb and some pollen mixed with
                  > honey that came from the
                  > > hive (these very bees produced) where we rescued
                  > this swarm.  Is there
                  > > a chance that the queen will begin her egg laying
                  > again or is she still
                  > > in a state of shock, if bees go into such a state.
                  > > I am concerned that the bees she has around her
                  > will die off before she
                  > > has a chance to produce new bees.
                  > > These bees are not in a hive body with frames.
                  > They are in a cardboard
                  > > box and we placed one frame in there for them and
                  > applied the pollen
                  > > honey mix, or royal jelly, that which I believe is
                  > used to feed the
                  > > queen and new bees.  Should we move them again
                  > into a regular hive body
                  > > and just hope for the best?
                  > > Pat
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >    To visit your group on the web, go to:
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beekeeping/
                  >  
                  >    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > beekeeping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >  
                  >    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                  > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >            
                  > ---------------------------------
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                • Jon McFadden
                  Hi Pat, I am sorry to hear about the hurricane damage. There is another way to get eggs in the colony. You can take a page from the queen breeders. Locate some
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 6, 2005
                    Hi Pat,
                    I am sorry to hear about the hurricane damage.
                    There is another way to get eggs in the colony.
                    You can take a page from the queen breeders. Locate
                    some eggs in the donor colony and cut out comb with
                    several cells of eggs. This is easy if you have
                    beeswax combs. Another method is grafting 1-3 day old
                    larvae. The grafting requires Royal Jelly to float it
                    in. It's delicate work and care needs to be taken that
                    the larvae aren't chilled.
                    Jon

                    --- Louis/Patricia Molnar
                    <molnar_louispatricia@...> wrote:

                    > Hi Jon,
                    > We lost all the hives we had during the past years
                    > hurricane season.
                    > The oldest hive we now have in the back yard has
                    > been here for barely a month, and there will not be
                    > enough eggs or larve for me to take. We will have
                    > to wait and see what will happen to these few.
                    > I thought I could just take a frame from the oldest
                    > hive and put them in with the few. Looks like I was
                    > mistaken.
                    > I forgot to mention this in my posts.
                    > My husband has been a keeper for much longer than I.
                    > My association with bees was waaaay back when I had
                    > purchased an entire hive 2 supers high for $50. And
                    > I have to be reintroduced to bee keeping.
                    > I enjoy this group, I am learning from it and my
                    > husband.
                    > Pat
                    >
                    > Jon McFadden <n6vc@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Pat,
                    > You'll be looking for frames that don't have capped
                    > brood. Do this during the heat of the day so the
                    > brood
                    > doesn't get chilled. If you hold the frame
                    > horizontally (something you shouldn't do with a TBF)
                    > and look into the cells, you will be able to see
                    > something in the bottom of the open cells; eggs and
                    > larvae. When you find a frame with eggs, be watchful
                    > because the queen may be on this frame. Make sure
                    > you
                    > don't transfer her to the new colony.
                    > Jon
                    >
                    > --- Louis/Patricia Molnar
                    > <molnar_louispatricia@...> wrote:
                    > > Jens,
                    > > Where in the hive would I find the frame with
                    > eggs?
                    > > And will I be robbing all the eggs from the other
                    > > hive? Is it best to do this in the evening or
                    > early
                    > > am.
                    > > Pat
                    > >
                    > > jens_khan <jens_khan@...> wrote:
                    > > Put the bees in a hive and then add a frame with
                    > > eggs from another
                    > > hive. If the bees start making queen cells they
                    > are
                    > > either without a
                    > > queen or something is wrong with the queen. You
                    > > should do this as soon
                    > > as possible while there are still young bees to
                    > feed
                    > > larvae and the
                    > > coming queen.
                    > >
                    > > Jens
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com,
                    > > "molnar_louispatricia"
                    > > <molnar_louispatricia@y...> wrote:
                    > > > After taking a swarm, apparently without the
                    > > queen, all the queen less
                    > > > bees took off seemingly during the night.
                    > > > We received a call from the same person, went
                    > back
                    > > and rescued what we
                    > > > think was the queen and a handful of bees.
                    > > (During our rescue with the
                    > > > B-Vac I think the queen hid during the activity)
                    > > They have been with us
                    > > > for about a week now and we have not noticed
                    > > anything happening. We
                    > > > gave them honeycomb and some pollen mixed with
                    > > honey that came from the
                    > > > hive (these very bees produced) where we rescued
                    > > this swarm. Is there
                    > > > a chance that the queen will begin her egg
                    > laying
                    > > again or is she still
                    > > > in a state of shock, if bees go into such a
                    > state.
                    > > > I am concerned that the bees she has around her
                    > > will die off before she
                    > > > has a chance to produce new bees.
                    > > > These bees are not in a hive body with frames.
                    > > They are in a cardboard
                    > > > box and we placed one frame in there for them
                    > and
                    > > applied the pollen
                    > > > honey mix, or royal jelly, that which I believe
                    > is
                    > > used to feed the
                    > > > queen and new bees. Should we move them again
                    > > into a regular hive body
                    > > > and just hope for the best?
                    > > > Pat
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ---------------------------------
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beekeeping/
                    > >
                    > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
                    > to:
                    > > beekeeping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > >
                    > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                    > > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ---------------------------------
                    > > Do you Yahoo!?
                    > > Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources
                    > site!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > __________________________________
                    > Yahoo! Mail Mobile
                    > Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Check email on your
                    > mobile phone.
                    > http://mobile.yahoo.com/learn/mail
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beekeeping/
                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > beekeeping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                    > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                    >
                    >
                    >
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