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Re: Digest Number 791

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  • dickbeekeeper
    Awhile back, Canadian bee researcher Steve Pernal looked at methods used to decontaminate woodenware. (Some numbers I have bookmarked.) 1. Scorching and Virkon
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 16, 2005
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      Awhile back, Canadian bee researcher Steve Pernal looked at methods used
      to decontaminate woodenware.

      (Some numbers I have bookmarked.)

      1. Scorching and Virkon S were about 84% effective.
      2. Powered water was 81% effective.
      3. Scrubbing was 77% effective.
      4. Steam and lye were nearly 100% effective, as is irradiation.

      Notice that scorching is not quite as effective as some think. Boiling *in lye* is
      effective, but that's nasty work.

      Regards,
      Dick Allen
    • jens_khan
      In Denmark a blend of lye and soap is the most common way to clean frames and supers whether you have AFB, EFB or not. It removes all wax, fat and dirt left on
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 16, 2005
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        In Denmark a blend of lye and soap is the most common way to clean
        frames and supers whether you have AFB, EFB or not. It removes all
        wax, fat and dirt left on the frames when the wax has been steamed
        off.
        Most beekeepeers change the bottom board in spring, and the super +
        frames used during the winter is always taken away in the autumn
        together with all frames that has contained brood. And it is all
        cleaned in boiling water with lye and soap.
        By following these simple procedures AFB and EFB is very rare, and
        almost always caused by beekeepers, who are not carefull enough when
        cleaning.
        There will always be af few spores og AFB or EFB but by only having
        strong straines og bees and follow the procedures above, it is
        possbile to keep the spores at such a low level, that it will not
        harm the bees.


        --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "dickbeekeeper"
        <dickbeekeeper@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Awhile back, Canadian bee researcher Steve Pernal looked at methods
        used
        > to decontaminate woodenware.
        >
        > (Some numbers I have bookmarked.)
        >
        > 1. Scorching and Virkon S were about 84% effective.
        > 2. Powered water was 81% effective.
        > 3. Scrubbing was 77% effective.
        > 4. Steam and lye were nearly 100% effective, as is irradiation.
        >
        > Notice that scorching is not quite as effective as some think.
        Boiling *in lye* is
        > effective, but that's nasty work.
        >
        > Regards,
        > Dick Allen
      • Ron/Eefje van Mierlo
        Ehh.. I understand your thinking, but it would not be correct to think that lower numbers of spores after a less than thorough treatment could ever be a
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 17, 2005
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          Ehh..
          I understand your thinking, but it would not be correct to think that lower
          numbers of spores after a less than thorough treatment could ever be a
          solution to get rid of AFB for 100%.
          Only an approach that will really remove all the spores should be applied
          for a hive burdened by AFB and that would be accomplished by for instance
          the burning up of the complete hive(s) or irradiation of them, just as Dick
          Allen alreay mentioned.
          Half measures are not worth anything in this regard and will only ensure
          that you will never really get rid of the AFB from your apiaries!
          Just one AFB infested cell can contain 2,5 milliard spores, the spores can
          become up till 80 years old and be found in the larvae, the honey, wax or
          cracks of hive boxes involved, so this should not be taken lightly!

          But in for hives in general it is of course better to keep clean and treated
          than to let them become dirty and thereby giving diseases a possible
          breeding ground.

          Ron van Mierlo
          Sweden

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "jens_khan" <jens_khan@...>
          To: <beekeeping@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, January 16, 2005 9:29 PM
          Subject: [beekeeping] Re: Digest Number 791


          >
          >
          > In Denmark a blend of lye and soap is the most common way to clean
          > frames and supers whether you have AFB, EFB or not. It removes all
          > wax, fat and dirt left on the frames when the wax has been steamed
          > off.
          > Most beekeepeers change the bottom board in spring, and the super +
          > frames used during the winter is always taken away in the autumn
          > together with all frames that has contained brood. And it is all
          > cleaned in boiling water with lye and soap.
          > By following these simple procedures AFB and EFB is very rare, and
          > almost always caused by beekeepers, who are not carefull enough when
          > cleaning.
          > There will always be af few spores og AFB or EFB but by only having
          > strong straines og bees and follow the procedures above, it is
          > possbile to keep the spores at such a low level, that it will not
          > harm the bees.
          >
          >
          > --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "dickbeekeeper"
          > <dickbeekeeper@y...> wrote:
          >>
          >> Awhile back, Canadian bee researcher Steve Pernal looked at methods
          > used
          >> to decontaminate woodenware.
          >>
          >> (Some numbers I have bookmarked.)
          >>
          >> 1. Scorching and Virkon S were about 84% effective.
          >> 2. Powered water was 81% effective.
          >> 3. Scrubbing was 77% effective.
          >> 4. Steam and lye were nearly 100% effective, as is irradiation.
          >>
          >> Notice that scorching is not quite as effective as some think.
          > Boiling *in lye* is
          >> effective, but that's nasty work.
          >>
          >> Regards,
          >> Dick Allen
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Shanta McBain
          ... There is more to burning the hives than just killing the spores in the hive. You should burn the bees with them. They are completely contaminated with AFB
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 18, 2005
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            On Monday 17 January 2005 10:41 am, Ron/Eefje van Mierlo wrote:
            > Ehh..
            > Half measures are not worth anything in this regard and will only ensure
            > that you will never really get rid of the AFB from your apiaries!
            > Just one AFB infested cell can contain 2,5 milliard spores, the spores can
            > become up till 80 years old and be found in the larvae, the honey, wax or
            > cracks of hive boxes involved, so this should not be taken lightly!

            There is more to burning the hives than just killing the spores in the hive.
            You should burn the bees with them. They are completely contaminated with AFB
            and worse they are genetically susceptible to the disease. You don't want
            them breeding with yours or your nabours good hives. On the rare occasion
            that we have gotten AFB we place the boxes, bees and all, into a large
            plastic bag. We seal all the bees in. They eather go directly into the burn
            barrel or they are frozen till sent for irradiation.

            This keeps the bad genetics out of the gene pool as well as keeping spores to
            a minimum. Hard medicine for a unforgiving disease.

            > But in for hives in general it is of course better to keep clean and
            > treated than to let them become dirty and thereby giving diseases a
            > possible breeding ground.

            This is a vary good pollicy but dose not make up for bad genetics.
            --
            Thanks
            Shanta McBain
            http://organicfarming.ca Organic Farming in Canada.
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