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Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

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  • Harold and Sue Karber
    Thank you, if, big if, I can salvage these bees then I can buy pollen from the bee supply places right. Is this clean pollen safe to use without infecting my
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 5, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Thank you, if, big if, I can salvage these bees then I can buy pollen from the bee supply places right.  Is this clean pollen safe to use without infecting my bees with anything or is it iffy?  Yes, I am that dumb about these things.
      Harold and Sue Karber
       
      If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, September 05, 2004 6:20 AM
      Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

      Sue,
       
      It has been my experience that at this time of year the poleen is not critical for the adult bees, but is for brood.  At this time of year brood production is down so pollen will be needed late winter early spring to kick off the brood production season.  Perhaps some more experienced beekeepers could comment on this.
       
      Richard of Danbury

      Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
      I am not young, not experienced but hate to kill these bees out.  They are so docile.  I must have walked passed them for years before I realized they were there.  20 years ago when we bought this place there were bees there but were suppose to be killed out.  I just wonder if they have been here all along?  I recently put two hives out and after a cold snap it got humid, hot and that is when I noticed them at the entrance.  My Italian bees were also at their entrance enmass that day.  The wall is full, that I know from listening with a stethoscope.  I am just so new to all this.  I have not even harvested my hives yet so they could get strong.
      If I pull this off myself without help I will feed them and add a brood comb thingy for them to develop a queen and will feed heavily all winter.  Will I need to buy and provide pollen since they aren't spring bees?
      Harold and Sue Karber
       
      If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 5:50 PM
      Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

      Sue,
       
      Just a heads yup on this wall capture.  I started beekeeping 3 years ago by capturing a wild colony in an old colonials era house that was being remodeled the owner was nice enough to lets myself and an experienced beekeeper open his clapboard siding.  The hive after continually expanding our cutting measured 12' x 10' and still no end in site.
       
      Meantime the population of bees was tremendous even he beekeeper stated he had never seen such a colony.  The bees were black and probably descendent's of the original hives brought by the colonists gone wild.
       
      We we capture what appeared by sight and weight to be about 40,000 + bees and never found the queen.  Meantime, it was at this time of year, early September and although the colony seem to settle into the new hive it was too late for them to build up sufficient stores of honey and pollen.  So they starved before the end of November.
       
      Keep in mind, that if you do take these bees you Must feed sugar solution very heavily.
       
      Hope this helps and good luck.
       
      Richard of Danbury
       
       


      Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
      There will be no assistants, that is why they are still there.  I just found them a couple weeks ago and so far everyone says to kill them but I hate to have that waste.  After all the cool weather I noticed a group on the wall and walked right up to them and saw the hole.  Then I got a stethoscope and heard them.  Been trying to figure out what to do since.  All friends, relatives and neighbor say no way. 
      Harold and Sue Karber
       
      If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 4:31 PM
      Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

      The main problem you will encounter is not enough smoke so use burlap in your smoker.
      also the bee brushes will get clogged with honey and not work propperly.  Have an assistent run water over the bristles to disolve the honey off.  Even better have several brushes at hand.
       
      The best to you each

      Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
      Thank you printed this out.  I would not know a queen if she held up a sign.  I am just learning/starting.  My husband is making a vac.  but works so much getting more hives is a problem.  I may try a old refrigerator until I can get some hives built if no one is available with proper equipment.
      Harold and Sue Karber
       
      If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 3:31 PM
      Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

      Remove the sheet rock or whatever to get to the bees, and use smoke.
      Use smoke and a bee brush and butcher knife to  remove the comb and separate the bees from the comb.  Stack the comb and remove it.  Come back after the bees have collected where the hive had been and sweep them into a cardboard apple box that can close compltetely.  Stab breathing holes through the box before putting the bees into it.  Put the into a super just at sundown.  Sprinkle powdered sugar on the bees and when they are fored to clean sugar off of themselves they will eliminate mites.  The sugar will be changed into comb.  Place a queen bee into the hive in a cage.  Wait a few days before releasing the queen bee.  Enjoy the choice honey combs.


      Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
      We have a huge bee hive in a 66' wall on the back of our gym.  The gym is scheduled to be torn down starting the 13th of Sept.  Are there any bee keepers that want to help us remove these bees in Oklahoma.  I have two Italian Hives and these bees are very docile in the wall.  I just don't know enough to remove them by myself and don't know if I can get hives here and ready in time.  Can they be kept in something besides a hive until I get more hives?  Sticky situation. 
       
      We are located in Kingfisher Oklahoma 375-3595 and it is ground level location. 
       
      Sue Karber
       
      If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
       







      Richard of Danbury




      Richard of Danbury

    • Guro Dennis Servaes
      Grass and trees are high in pollen so your bees can gather plenty of pollen. Feediing your bees will cause as many problems as it solves. Just make sure they
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 5, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Grass and trees are high in pollen so your bees can gather plenty of pollen.  Feediing your bees will cause as many problems as it solves.  Just make sure they have what they need and let them do for themselves.  Sucrose is changed to wax if your bees have to build up comb, so you can feed sucrose, but not at hives as it attracts ants.  Ants avoid mints.

        Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
        Thank you, if, big if, I can salvage these bees then I can buy pollen from the bee supply places right.  Is this clean pollen safe to use without infecting my bees with anything or is it iffy?  Yes, I am that dumb about these things.
        Harold and Sue Karber
         
        If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, September 05, 2004 6:20 AM
        Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

        Sue,
         
        It has been my experience that at this time of year the poleen is not critical for the adult bees, but is for brood.  At this time of year brood production is down so pollen will be needed late winter early spring to kick off the brood production season.  Perhaps some more experienced beekeepers could comment on this.
         
        Richard of Danbury

        Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
        I am not young, not experienced but hate to kill these bees out.  They are so docile.  I must have walked passed them for years before I realized they were there.  20 years ago when we bought this place there were bees there but were suppose to be killed out.  I just wonder if they have been here all along?  I recently put two hives out and after a cold snap it got humid, hot and that is when I noticed them at the entrance.  My Italian bees were also at their entrance enmass that day.  The wall is full, that I know from listening with a stethoscope.  I am just so new to all this.  I have not even harvested my hives yet so they could get strong.
        If I pull this off myself without help I will feed them and add a brood comb thingy for them to develop a queen and will feed heavily all winter.  Will I need to buy and provide pollen since they aren't spring bees?
        Harold and Sue Karber
         
        If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 5:50 PM
        Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

        Sue,
         
        Just a heads yup on this wall capture.  I started beekeeping 3 years ago by capturing a wild colony in an old colonials era house that was being remodeled the owner was nice enough to lets myself and an experienced beekeeper open his clapboard siding.  The hive after continually expanding our cutting measured 12' x 10' and still no end in site.
         
        Meantime the population of bees was tremendous even he beekeeper stated he had never seen such a colony.  The bees were black and probably descendent's of the original hives brought by the colonists gone wild.
         
        We we capture what appeared by sight and weight to be about 40,000 + bees and never found the queen.  Meantime, it was at this time of year, early September and although the colony seem to settle into the new hive it was too late for them to build up sufficient stores of honey and pollen.  So they starved before the end of November.
         
        Keep in mind, that if you do take these bees you Must feed sugar solution very heavily.
         
        Hope this helps and good luck.
         
        Richard of Danbury
         
         


        Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
        There will be no assistants, that is why they are still there.  I just found them a couple weeks ago and so far everyone says to kill them but I hate to have that waste.  After all the cool weather I noticed a group on the wall and walked right up to them and saw the hole.  Then I got a stethoscope and heard them.  Been trying to figure out what to do since.  All friends, relatives and neighbor say no way. 
        Harold and Sue Karber
         
        If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 4:31 PM
        Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

        The main problem you will encounter is not enough smoke so use burlap in your smoker.
        also the bee brushes will get clogged with honey and not work propperly.  Have an assistent run water over the bristles to disolve the honey off.  Even better have several brushes at hand.
         
        The best to you each

        Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
        Thank you printed this out.  I would not know a queen if she held up a sign.  I am just learning/starting.  My husband is making a vac.  but works so much getting more hives is a problem.  I may try a old refrigerator until I can get some hives built if no one is available with proper equipment.
        Harold and Sue Karber
         
        If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 3:31 PM
        Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

        Remove the sheet rock or whatever to get to the bees, and use smoke.
        Use smoke and a bee brush and butcher knife to  remove the comb and separate the bees from the comb.  Stack the comb and remove it.  Come back after the bees have collected where the hive had been and sweep them into a cardboard apple box that can close compltetely.  Stab breathing holes through the box before putting the bees into it.  Put the into a super just at sundown.  Sprinkle powdered sugar on the bees and when they are fored to clean sugar off of themselves they will eliminate mites.  The sugar will be changed into comb.  Place a queen bee into the hive in a cage.  Wait a few days before releasing the queen bee.  Enjoy the choice honey combs.


        Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
        We have a huge bee hive in a 66' wall on the back of our gym.  The gym is scheduled to be torn down starting the 13th of Sept.  Are there any bee keepers that want to help us remove these bees in Oklahoma.  I have two Italian Hives and these bees are very docile in the wall.  I just don't know enough to remove them by myself and don't know if I can get hives here and ready in time.  Can they be kept in something besides a hive until I get more hives?  Sticky situation. 
         
        We are located in Kingfisher Oklahoma 375-3595 and it is ground level location. 
         
        Sue Karber
         
        If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
         







        Richard of Danbury




        Richard of Danbury


      • Guro Dennis Servaes
        notify your local county ag commissioner about the bees and they will give you the contact info for three different beekeepers Guro Dennis Servaes
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 5, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          notify your local county ag commissioner about the bees and they will give you the contact info for three different beekeepers

          Guro Dennis Servaes <guro@...> wrote:
          Grass and trees are high in pollen so your bees can gather plenty of pollen.  Feediing your bees will cause as many problems as it solves.  Just make sure they have what they need and let them do for themselves.  Sucrose is changed to wax if your bees have to build up comb, so you can feed sucrose, but not at hives as it attracts ants.  Ants avoid mints.

          Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
          Thank you, if, big if, I can salvage these bees then I can buy pollen from the bee supply places right.  Is this clean pollen safe to use without infecting my bees with anything or is it iffy?  Yes, I am that dumb about these things.
          Harold and Sue Karber
           
          If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, September 05, 2004 6:20 AM
          Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

          Sue,
           
          It has been my experience that at this time of year the poleen is not critical for the adult bees, but is for brood.  At this time of year brood production is down so pollen will be needed late winter early spring to kick off the brood production season.  Perhaps some more experienced beekeepers could comment on this.
           
          Richard of Danbury

          Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
          I am not young, not experienced but hate to kill these bees out.  They are so docile.  I must have walked passed them for years before I realized they were there.  20 years ago when we bought this place there were bees there but were suppose to be killed out.  I just wonder if they have been here all along?  I recently put two hives out and after a cold snap it got humid, hot and that is when I noticed them at the entrance.  My Italian bees were also at their entrance enmass that day.  The wall is full, that I know from listening with a stethoscope.  I am just so new to all this.  I have not even harvested my hives yet so they could get strong.
          If I pull this off myself without help I will feed them and add a brood comb thingy for them to develop a queen and will feed heavily all winter.  Will I need to buy and provide pollen since they aren't spring bees?
          Harold and Sue Karber
           
          If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 5:50 PM
          Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

          Sue,
           
          Just a heads yup on this wall capture.  I started beekeeping 3 years ago by capturing a wild colony in an old colonials era house that was being remodeled the owner was nice enough to lets myself and an experienced beekeeper open his clapboard siding.  The hive after continually expanding our cutting measured 12' x 10' and still no end in site.
           
          Meantime the population of bees was tremendous even he beekeeper stated he had never seen such a colony.  The bees were black and probably descendent's of the original hives brought by the colonists gone wild.
           
          We we capture what appeared by sight and weight to be about 40,000 + bees and never found the queen.  Meantime, it was at this time of year, early September and although the colony seem to settle into the new hive it was too late for them to build up sufficient stores of honey and pollen.  So they starved before the end of November.
           
          Keep in mind, that if you do take these bees you Must feed sugar solution very heavily.
           
          Hope this helps and good luck.
           
          Richard of Danbury
           
           


          Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
          There will be no assistants, that is why they are still there.  I just found them a couple weeks ago and so far everyone says to kill them but I hate to have that waste.  After all the cool weather I noticed a group on the wall and walked right up to them and saw the hole.  Then I got a stethoscope and heard them.  Been trying to figure out what to do since.  All friends, relatives and neighbor say no way. 
          Harold and Sue Karber
           
          If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 4:31 PM
          Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

          The main problem you will encounter is not enough smoke so use burlap in your smoker.
          also the bee brushes will get clogged with honey and not work propperly.  Have an assistent run water over the bristles to disolve the honey off.  Even better have several brushes at hand.
           
          The best to you each

          Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
          Thank you printed this out.  I would not know a queen if she held up a sign.  I am just learning/starting.  My husband is making a vac.  but works so much getting more hives is a problem.  I may try a old refrigerator until I can get some hives built if no one is available with proper equipment.
          Harold and Sue Karber
           
          If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 3:31 PM
          Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

          Remove the sheet rock or whatever to get to the bees, and use smoke.
          Use smoke and a bee brush and butcher knife to  remove the comb and separate the bees from the comb.  Stack the comb and remove it.  Come back after the bees have collected where the hive had been and sweep them into a cardboard apple box that can close compltetely.  Stab breathing holes through the box before putting the bees into it.  Put the into a super just at sundown.  Sprinkle powdered sugar on the bees and when they are fored to clean sugar off of themselves they will eliminate mites.  The sugar will be changed into comb.  Place a queen bee into the hive in a cage.  Wait a few days before releasing the queen bee.  Enjoy the choice honey combs.


          Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
          We have a huge bee hive in a 66' wall on the back of our gym.  The gym is scheduled to be torn down starting the 13th of Sept.  Are there any bee keepers that want to help us remove these bees in Oklahoma.  I have two Italian Hives and these bees are very docile in the wall.  I just don't know enough to remove them by myself and don't know if I can get hives here and ready in time.  Can they be kept in something besides a hive until I get more hives?  Sticky situation. 
           
          We are located in Kingfisher Oklahoma 375-3595 and it is ground level location. 
           
          Sue Karber
           
          If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
           







          Richard of Danbury




          Richard of Danbury



        • Harold and Sue Karber
          Thank you, we have lots of pollen naturally around here. Harold and Sue Karber If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list. ... From: Guro
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 6, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Thank you, we have lots of pollen naturally around here.
            Harold and Sue Karber
             
            If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, September 05, 2004 4:34 PM
            Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

            Grass and trees are high in pollen so your bees can gather plenty of pollen.  Feediing your bees will cause as many problems as it solves.  Just make sure they have what they need and let them do for themselves.  Sucrose is changed to wax if your bees have to build up comb, so you can feed sucrose, but not at hives as it attracts ants.  Ants avoid mints.

            Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
            Thank you, if, big if, I can salvage these bees then I can buy pollen from the bee supply places right.  Is this clean pollen safe to use without infecting my bees with anything or is it iffy?  Yes, I am that dumb about these things.
            Harold and Sue Karber
             
            If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, September 05, 2004 6:20 AM
            Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

            Sue,
             
            It has been my experience that at this time of year the poleen is not critical for the adult bees, but is for brood.  At this time of year brood production is down so pollen will be needed late winter early spring to kick off the brood production season.  Perhaps some more experienced beekeepers could comment on this.
             
            Richard of Danbury

            Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
            I am not young, not experienced but hate to kill these bees out.  They are so docile.  I must have walked passed them for years before I realized they were there.  20 years ago when we bought this place there were bees there but were suppose to be killed out.  I just wonder if they have been here all along?  I recently put two hives out and after a cold snap it got humid, hot and that is when I noticed them at the entrance.  My Italian bees were also at their entrance enmass that day.  The wall is full, that I know from listening with a stethoscope.  I am just so new to all this.  I have not even harvested my hives yet so they could get strong.
            If I pull this off myself without help I will feed them and add a brood comb thingy for them to develop a queen and will feed heavily all winter.  Will I need to buy and provide pollen since they aren't spring bees?
            Harold and Sue Karber
             
            If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 5:50 PM
            Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

            Sue,
             
            Just a heads yup on this wall capture.  I started beekeeping 3 years ago by capturing a wild colony in an old colonials era house that was being remodeled the owner was nice enough to lets myself and an experienced beekeeper open his clapboard siding.  The hive after continually expanding our cutting measured 12' x 10' and still no end in site.
             
            Meantime the population of bees was tremendous even he beekeeper stated he had never seen such a colony.  The bees were black and probably descendent's of the original hives brought by the colonists gone wild.
             
            We we capture what appeared by sight and weight to be about 40,000 + bees and never found the queen.  Meantime, it was at this time of year, early September and although the colony seem to settle into the new hive it was too late for them to build up sufficient stores of honey and pollen.  So they starved before the end of November.
             
            Keep in mind, that if you do take these bees you Must feed sugar solution very heavily.
             
            Hope this helps and good luck.
             
            Richard of Danbury
             
             


            Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
            There will be no assistants, that is why they are still there.  I just found them a couple weeks ago and so far everyone says to kill them but I hate to have that waste.  After all the cool weather I noticed a group on the wall and walked right up to them and saw the hole.  Then I got a stethoscope and heard them.  Been trying to figure out what to do since.  All friends, relatives and neighbor say no way. 
            Harold and Sue Karber
             
            If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 4:31 PM
            Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

            The main problem you will encounter is not enough smoke so use burlap in your smoker.
            also the bee brushes will get clogged with honey and not work propperly.  Have an assistent run water over the bristles to disolve the honey off.  Even better have several brushes at hand.
             
            The best to you each

            Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
            Thank you printed this out.  I would not know a queen if she held up a sign.  I am just learning/starting.  My husband is making a vac.  but works so much getting more hives is a problem.  I may try a old refrigerator until I can get some hives built if no one is available with proper equipment.
            Harold and Sue Karber
             
            If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 3:31 PM
            Subject: Re: [beekeeping] Bees in wall

            Remove the sheet rock or whatever to get to the bees, and use smoke.
            Use smoke and a bee brush and butcher knife to  remove the comb and separate the bees from the comb.  Stack the comb and remove it.  Come back after the bees have collected where the hive had been and sweep them into a cardboard apple box that can close compltetely.  Stab breathing holes through the box before putting the bees into it.  Put the into a super just at sundown.  Sprinkle powdered sugar on the bees and when they are fored to clean sugar off of themselves they will eliminate mites.  The sugar will be changed into comb.  Place a queen bee into the hive in a cage.  Wait a few days before releasing the queen bee.  Enjoy the choice honey combs.


            Harold and Sue Karber <karber@...> wrote:
            We have a huge bee hive in a 66' wall on the back of our gym.  The gym is scheduled to be torn down starting the 13th of Sept.  Are there any bee keepers that want to help us remove these bees in Oklahoma.  I have two Italian Hives and these bees are very docile in the wall.  I just don't know enough to remove them by myself and don't know if I can get hives here and ready in time.  Can they be kept in something besides a hive until I get more hives?  Sticky situation. 
             
            We are located in Kingfisher Oklahoma 375-3595 and it is ground level location. 
             
            Sue Karber
             
            If you must put someone down, put them on your prayer list.
             







            Richard of Danbury




            Richard of Danbury



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