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Re: [beekeeping] Imirie shims

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  • Mike
    Wayne wrote concerning captured swarms: How can I use these swarms to my best advantage for honey production this year? I want to correct a post I made
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 15, 2004
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      Wayne wrote concerning captured swarms: "How can I use these swarms to
      my best advantage for honey production
      this year?"

      I want to correct a post I made yesterday, 14 Jun. First the spelling
      is Imirie. Secondly the shim is 3/4" thick, not the 5/8" dimension I
      used yesterday. After going through some of the postings in the BEE-L
      archives I have learned that the two queen hive can post quite a
      challenge. It is almost always a definite honey producer, but can
      require more than average management and quite a bit of high lifting.
      If you use it I wish you the best of luck and please let the list know
      the results of your efforts.

      MIKE
    • Matthew
      -Right now i m in far southern Idaho, just north of the Utah border collecting some data for my research. I kept noticing that the hives around here have what
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 15, 2004
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        -Right now i'm in far southern Idaho, just north of
        the Utah border collecting some data for my research.
        I kept noticing that the hives around here have what
        appears to be 2 wood-bound queen excluder in them.
        Last night at the local pub some guy started talking
        to me about bees (b/c i was wearing a WSBA hat). I
        asked if they are running 2 queens and he said they
        always do because of the poor crops out here. Or
        something like that. I wish i talked more with him
        about it, but had to continue my game of darts.
        mp

        =====
        Matthew Pollard "Racing with the wind and flirting with death
        Dept. Of Chemistry So have a cup of coffee and catch your breath"
        University of Idaho
        www.ftir.chem.uidaho.edu



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      • Wayne Chesley
        Thanks for the sugestion, I had considered that.eing fairly new to beekeeping (in my second season) I d rather wait until I have more experience before I get
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 17, 2004
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          Thanks for the sugestion, I had considered that.eing fairly new to
          beekeeping (in my second season) I'd rather wait until I have more
          experience before I get into 2 Queen setups.

          What I am finding already with these swarms is that they are
          building comb on raw foundation at a fantrastic rate. I may take
          advantage of that and leave them alone, then combine the weakest
          hives in the fall. Being new, with all new equipment, I could use
          the comb.

          Wayne


          > Wayne wrote concerning captured swarms: "How can I use these
          swarms to
          > my best advantage for honey production
          > this year?"
          >
          > You can try working the two queen method for honey production.
          This
        • Scot Mc Pherson
          ... If you think they draw foundation quickly you should see how fast they can draw their own comb. -- Scot Mc Pherson Sarasota,
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 17, 2004
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            On Thursday 17 June 2004 06:40 am, Wayne Chesley wrote:
            > Thanks for the sugestion, I had considered that.eing fairly new to
            > beekeeping (in my second season) I'd rather wait until I have more
            > experience before I get into 2 Queen setups.
            >
            > What I am finding already with these swarms is that they are
            > building comb on raw foundation at a fantrastic rate. I may take
            > advantage of that and leave them alone, then combine the weakest
            > hives in the fall. Being new, with all new equipment, I could use
            > the comb.

            If you think they draw foundation quickly you should see how fast they can
            draw their own comb.

            --
            Scot Mc Pherson <scot@...>
            Sarasota, Florida, USA
            http://linuxfromscratch.org/~scot/
            ICQ: 342949 AIM: ScotLFS MSN: behomet@...
          • Wayne Chesley
            ... Actually I discovered that as well when I left a full hive body I had used in capturing them on top of the main body for a week before removing it. I had
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 17, 2004
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              --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, Scot Mc Pherson <scot@l...> wrote:

              > If you think they draw foundation quickly you should see how
              > fast they can draw their own comb.


              Actually I discovered that as well when I left a full hive body I
              had used in capturing them on top of the main body for a week before
              removing it. I had some truly beautiful natural comb hangng from the
              inner cover and quite a job returning their pollen and nectar to
              them.

              Wayne
            • dickbeekeeper
              ... Those who capture swarms here in Anchorage do just what you have in mind. Bees in a swarm are generally younger bees with well developed wax glands.
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 17, 2004
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                --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "Wayne Chesley" <wantnotfarm@h...>
                wrote:

                > What I am finding already with these swarms is that they are
                > building comb on raw foundation at a fantrastic rate. I may take
                > advantage of that and leave them alone, then combine the weakest
                > hives in the fall. Being new, with all new equipment, I could use
                > the comb.


                Those who capture swarms here in Anchorage do just what you have in
                mind. Bees in a swarm are generally younger bees with well developed
                wax glands. Putting them on empty foundation and feeding syrup to
                them is a great way to build new comb.

                Regards,
                Dick Allen
              • Wayne Chesley
                Thanks Dick, I thought about feeding sugar syrup, so I think I will. I get free sugar so it s an even better bargain. Wayne ... in ... developed
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 19, 2004
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                  Thanks Dick, I thought about feeding sugar syrup, so I think I will.
                  I get free sugar so it's an even better bargain.

                  Wayne

                  --- In beekeeping@yahoogroups.com, "dickbeekeeper"
                  <dickbeekeeper@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Those who capture swarms here in Anchorage do just what you have
                  in
                  > mind. Bees in a swarm are generally younger bees with well
                  developed
                  > wax glands. Putting them on empty foundation and feeding syrup to
                  > them is a great way to build new comb.
                • dickbeekeeper
                  Beekeepers: Speaking of SMALL swarms, Ronald Ribbands begins some of the chapters of his book The Behaviour and Social Life of Honeybees with a few lines of
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 19, 2004
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                    Beekeepers:

                    Speaking of SMALL swarms, Ronald Ribbands begins some of the chapters
                    of his book "The Behaviour and Social Life of Honeybees" with a few
                    lines of verse. This is from his chapter on swarming and supersedure:


                    The hive contained one obstinate bee
                    (His name was Peter), and thus spake he–
                    `Though every bee has shown white feather,
                    To bow to tyranny I'm not prone–
                    Why should a hive swarm all together?
                    Sure a bee can swarm alone?'

                    Upside down and inside out,
                    Backwards, forwards, round about,
                    Twirling here and twisting there,
                    Topsily turvily everwhere–
                    Pitiful sight it was to see
                    Respectable elderly high-class bee,
                    Who kicked the beam at sixteen stone,
                    Trying his best to swarm alone.
                    W.S. Gilbert, "The Bab Ballads"

                    Regards,
                    Dick Allen
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